Networks Seminar

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
26 November 2019
12:00
Abstract

Persistent homology has been applied to graph classification problems as a way of generating vectorizable features of graphs that can be fed into machine learning algorithms, such as neural networks. A key ingredient of this approach is a filter constructor that assigns vector features to nodes to generate a filtration. In the case where the filter constructor is smoothly tuned by a set of real parameters, we can train a neural network graph classifier on data to learn an optimal set of parameters via the backpropagation of gradients that factor through persistence diagrams [Leygonie et al., arXiv:1910.00960]. We propose a flexible, spectral-based filter constructor that parses standalone graphs, generalizing methods proposed in [Carrière et al., arXiv: 1904.09378]. Our method has an advantage over optimizable filter constructors based on iterative message passing schemes (`graph neural networks’) [Hofer et al., arXiv: 1905.10996] which rely on heuristic user inputs of vertex features to initialise the scheme for datasets where vertex features are absent. We apply our methods to several benchmark datasets and demonstrate results comparable to current state-of-the-art graph classification methods.

25 February 2020
12:00
Marya Bazzi
Abstract

Multilayer networks are a way to represent dependent connectivity patterns — e.g., time-dependence, multiple types of interactions, or both — that arise in many applications and which are difficult to incorporate into standard network representations. In the study of multilayer networks, it is important to investigate mesoscale (i.e., intermediate-scale) structures, such as communities, to discover features that lie between the microscale and the macroscale. We introduce a framework for the construction of generative models for mesoscale structure in multilayer networks.  We model dependency at the level of partitions rather than with respect to edges, and treat the process of generating a multilayer partition separately from the process of generating edges for a given multilayer partition. Our framework can admit many features of empirical multilayer networks and explicitly incorporates a user-specified interlayer dependency structure. We discuss the parameters and some properties of our framework, and illustrate an example of its use with benchmark models for multilayer community-detection tools. 

 

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