Stochastic Analysis & Mathematical Finance Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
Tomorrow
16:00
BEATRICE ACCIAIO
Abstract

 

In this talk I will consider model-independent pricing problems in a stochastic interest rates framework. In this case the usual tools from Optimal Transport and Skorokhod embedding cannot be applied. I will show how some pricing problems in a fixed-income market can be reformulated as Weak Optimal Transport (WOT) problems as introduced by Gozlan et al. I will present a super-replication theorem that follows from an extension of WOT results to the case of non-convex cost functions.
This talk is based on joint work with M. Beiglboeck and G. Pammer.

  • Stochastic Analysis & Mathematical Finance Seminars
7 December 2020
16:00
PATRICK CHERIDITO
Abstract

We develop a framework for showing that neural networks can overcome the curse of dimensionality in different high-dimensional approximation problems. Our approach is based on the notion of a catalog network, which is a generalization of a standard neural network in which the nonlinear activation functions can vary from layer to layer as long as they are chosen from a predefined catalog of functions. As such, catalog networks constitute a rich family of continuous functions. We show that under appropriate conditions on the catalog, catalog networks can efficiently be approximated with ReLU-type networks and provide precise estimates on the number of parameters needed for a given approximation accuracy. As special cases of the general results, we obtain different classes of functions that can be approximated with ReLU networks without the curse of dimensionality. 

 

A preprint is here: https://arxiv.org/abs/1912.04310

  • Stochastic Analysis & Mathematical Finance Seminars
25 January 2021
16:00
DONGHAN KIM
Abstract

An open market is a subset of a larger equity market, composed of a certain fixed number of top‐capitalization stocks. Though the number of stocks in the open market is fixed, their composition changes over time, as each company's rank by market capitalization fluctuates. When one is allowed to invest also in a money market, an open market resembles the entire “closed” equity market in the sense that the market viability (lack of arbitrage) is equivalent to the existence of a numéraire portfolio (which cannot be outperformed). When access to the money market is prohibited, the class of portfolios shrinks significantly in open markets; in such a setting, we discuss how to construct functionally generated stock portfolios and the concept of the universal portfolio.

This talk is based on joint work with Ioannis Karatzas.

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  • Stochastic Analysis & Mathematical Finance Seminars
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