Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
1 February 2018
14:00
Ruth Misener
Abstract


Decision trees usefully represent the sparse, high dimensional and noisy nature of chemical data from experiments. Having learned a function from this data, we may want to thereafter optimise the function, e.g. for picking the best catalyst for a chemical process. This work studies a mixed-integer non-linear optimisation problem involving: (i) gradient boosted trees modelling catalyst behaviour, (ii) penalty functions mitigating risk, and (iii) penalties enforcing chemical composition constraints. We develop several heuristic methods to find feasible solutions, and an exact, branch and bound algorithm that leverages structural properties of the gradient boost trees and penalty functions. We computationally test our methods on an industrial instance from BASF.
This work was completed in collaboration with Mr Miten Mistry and Dr Dimitris Letsios at Imperial College London and Dr Robert Lee and Dr Gerhard Krennrich from BASF.
 

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
22 February 2018
14:00
Daniel Ruprecht
Abstract

The rapidly increasing number of cores in high-performance computing systems causes a multitude of challenges for developers of numerical methods. New parallel algorithms are required to unlock future growth in computing power for applications and energy efficiency and algorithm-based fault tolerance are becoming increasingly important. So far, most approaches to parallelise the numerical solution of partial differential equations focussed on spatial solvers, leaving time as a bottleneck. Recently, however, time stepping methods that offer some degree of concurrency, so-called parallel-in-time integration methods, have started to receive more attention.

I will introduce two different numerical algorithms, Parareal (by Lions et al., 2001) and PFASST (by Emmett and Minion, 2012), that allow to exploit concurrency along the time dimension in parallel computer simulations solving partial differential equations. Performance results for both methods on different architectures and for different equations will be presented. The PFASST algorithm is based on merging ideas from Parareal, spectral deferred corrections (SDC, an iterative approach to derive high-order time stepping methods by Dutt et al. 2000) and nonlinear multi-grid. Performance results for PFASST on close to half a million cores will illustrate the potential of the approach. Algorithmic modifications like IPFASST will be introduced that can further reduce solution times. Also, recent results showing how parallel-in-time integration can provide algorithm-based tolerance against hardware faults will be shown.

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
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