Forthcoming Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
6 December 2019
10:00
Steve Walker
Abstract

This challenge relates to problems (of a mathematical nature) in generating optimal solutions for natural flood management.  Natural flood management involves large numbers of small scale interventions in a much larger context through exploiting natural features in place of, for example, large civil engineering construction works. There is an optimisation problem related to the catchment hydrology and present methods use several unsatisfactory simplifications and assumptions that we would like to improve on.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
6 December 2019
14:00
Srikanth Toppaladoddi
Abstract

Arctic sea ice is one of the most sensitive components of the Earth’s climate system. The underlying ocean plays an important role in the evolution of the ice cover through its heat flux at the ice-ocean interface. Despite its importance, the spatio-temporal variations of this heat flux are not well understood. In this talk, I will take the following approach to study the variations in the heat flux. First, I will consider the problem of classical Rayleigh-Bénard convection and systematically explore the effects of fractal boundaries on heat transport using direct numerical simulations. And second, I will analyze time-series data from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) program using Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MFDFA) to understand the nature of fluctuations in the heat flux. I will also discuss developing simple stochastic ODEs using results from these studies.

  • Mathematical Geoscience Seminar
6 December 2019
14:00
Abstract

Would you like to meet some of your fellow students, and some graduate students and postdocs, in an informal and relaxed atmosphere, while building your communication skills?  In this Friday@2 session, you'll be able to play a selection of board games, meet new people, and practise working together.  What better way to spend the final Friday afternoon of term?!  We'll play the games in the south Mezzanine area of the Andrew Wiles Building, outside L3.

6 December 2019
15:00
Abstract

The goal of topological data analysis is to apply tools form algebraic topology to reveal geometric structures hidden within high dimensional data. Mapper is among its most widely and successfully applied tools providing, a framework for the geometric analysis of point cloud data. Given a number of input parameters, the Mapper algorithm constructs a graph, giving rise to a visual representation of the structure of the data.  The Mapper graph is a topological representation, where the placement of individual vertices and edges is not important, while geometric features such as loops and flares are revealed.

 

However, Mappers method is rather ad hoc, and would therefore benefit from a formal approach governing how to make the necessary choices. In this talk I will present joint work with Francisco Belchì, Jacek Brodzki, and Mahesan Niranjan. We study how sensitive to perturbations of the data the graph returned by the Mapper algorithm is given a particular tuning of parameters and how this depend on the choice of those parameters. Treating Mapper as a clustering generalisation, we develop a notion of instability of Mapper and study how it is affected by the choices. In particular, we obtain concrete reasons for high values of Mapper instability and experimentally demonstrate how Mapper instability can be used to determine good Mapper outputs.

 

Our approach tackles directly the inherent instability of the choice of clustering procedure and requires very few assumption on the specifics of the data or chosen Mapper construction, making it applicable to any Mapper-type algorithm.

  • Topological Data Analysis Seminar
6 December 2019
16:00
Abstract

Dr Rachel Philip will discuss her experiences working at the interface between academic mathematics and industry. Oxford University Innovation will discuss how they can help academics when interacting with industry. 

9 December 2019
14:15
to
15:45
ILYA CHEVYREV
Abstract

Yang-Mills theory plays an important role in the Standard Model and is behind many mathematical developments in geometric analysis. In this talk, I will present several recent results on the problem of constructing quantum Yang-Mills measures in 2 and 3 dimensions. I will particularly speak about a representation of the 2D measure as a random distributional connection and as the invariant measure of a Markov process arising from stochastic quantisation. I will also discuss the relationship with previous constructions of Driver, Sengupta, and Lévy based on random holonomies, and the difficulties in passing from 2 to 3 dimensions. Partly based on joint work with Ajay Chandra, Martin Hairer, and Hao Shen.

  • Stochastic Analysis & Mathematical Finance Seminars
9 December 2019
15:45
GONCALO DOS REIS
Abstract


We present several Itô-Wentzell formulae on Wiener spaces for real-valued functionals random field of Itô type depending on measures. We distinguish the full- and marginal-measure flow cases. Derivatives with respect to the measure components are understood in the sense of Lions.
This talk is based on joint work with V. Platonov (U. of Edinburgh), see https://arxiv.org/abs/1910.01892.
 

  • Stochastic Analysis & Mathematical Finance Seminars
10 December 2019
12:00
Samuel Martin-Gutierrez
Abstract

Political polarization generates strong effects on society, driving controversial debates and influencing the institutions. Territorial disputes are one of the most important polarized scenarios and have been consistently related to the use of language. In this work, we analyzed the opinion and language distributions of a particular territorial dispute around the independence of the Spanish region of Catalonia through Twitter data. We infer a continuous opinion distribution by applying a model based on retweet interactions, previously selecting a seed of elite users with fixed and antagonist opinions. The resulting distribution presents a mainly bimodal behavior with an intermediate third pole that appears spontaneously showing a less polarized society with the presence of not only antagonist opinions. We find that the more active, engaged and influential users hold more extreme positions. Also we prove that there is a clear relationship between political positions and the use of language, showing that against independence users speak mainly Spanish while pro-independence users speak Catalan and Spanish almost indistinctly. However, the third pole, closer in political opinion to the pro-independence pole, behaves similarly to the against-independence one concerning the use of language.

Ref: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-53404-x



 

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