Forthcoming Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
Tomorrow
14:00
Fiona Skerman
Abstract

Modularity is a function on graphs which is used in algorithms for community detection. For a given graph G, each partition of the vertices has a modularity score, with higher values indicating that the partition better captures community structure in $G$. The (max) modularity $q^\ast(G)$ of the graph $G$ is defined to be the maximum over all vertex partitions of the modularity score, and satisfies $0 \leq q^\ast(G) \leq 1$.

We analyse when community structure of an underlying graph can be determined from an observed subset of the graph. In a natural model where we suppose edges in an underlying graph $G$ appear with some probability in our observed graph $G'$ we describe how high a sampling probability we need to infer the community structure of the underlying graph.

Joint work with Colin McDiarmid.

  • Combinatorial Theory Seminar
Tomorrow
14:00
Carolin Penke
Abstract

The QDWH algorithm can compute the polar decomposition of a matrix in a stable and efficient way. We generalize this method in order to compute generalized polar decompositions with respect to signature matrices. Here, the role of the QR decomposition is played by the hyperbolic QR decomposition. However, it doesn't show the same favorable properties concerning stability as its orthogonal counterpart. Remedies are found by exploiting connections to the LDL^T factorization and by employing well-conditioned permuted graph bases. The computed polar decomposition is used to formulate a structure-preserving spectral divide-and-conquer method for pseudosymmetric matrices. Applications of this method are found in computational quantum physics, where eigenvalues and eigenvectors describe optical properties of condensed matter or molecules. Additional properties guarantee fast convergence and a reduction to symmetric definite eigenvalue problems after just one step of spectral divide-and-conquer.

  • Numerical Analysis Group Internal Seminar
Tomorrow
14:15
Prof. Tim Riley

Further Information: 


A group is sofic when every finite subset can be well approximated in a finite symmetric group. The outstanding question, due to Gromov, is whether every group is sofic.
Helfgott and Juschenko argued that a celebrated group constructed by Higman is unlikely to be sofic because its soficity would imply the existence of some seemingly pathological functions.  I will describe joint work with Martin Kassabov and Vivian Kuperberg in which we construct variations on Higman's group and explore their soficity.  
 

Tomorrow
15:30
Nikolaos Zygouras
Abstract

It is known that random matrix distributions such as those that describe the largest eignevalue of the Gaussian Orthogonal and Symplectic ensembles (GOE, GSE) admit two types of representations: one in terms of a Fredholm Pfaffian and one in terms of a Fredholm determinant. The equality of the two sets of expressions has so far been established via involved computations of linear algebraic nature. We provide a structural explanation of this duality via links (old and new) between the model of last passage percolation and the irreducible characters of classical groups, in particular the general linear, symplectic and orthogonal groups, and by studying, combinatorially, how their representations decompose when restricted to certain subgroups. Based on joint work with Elia Bisi.

  • Random Matrix Theory seminars
Tomorrow
15:30
Noah Arbesfeld
Abstract

Tautological bundles on Hilbert schemes of points often enter into enumerative and physical computations. I will explain how to use the Donaldson-Thomas theory of toric threefolds to produce combinatorial identities that are expressed geometrically using tautological bundles on the Hilbert scheme of points on a surface. I'll also explain how these identities can be used to study Euler characteristics of tautological bundles over Hilbert schemes of points on general surfaces.

  • Algebraic Geometry Seminar
30 January 2020
12:00
José Manuel Palacios
Abstract

The Camassa-Holm (CH) equation is a nonlinear nonlocal dispersive equation which arises as a model for the propagation of unidirectional shallow water waves over a flat bottom. One of the most important features of the CH equation is the existence of peaked travelling waves, also called peakons. The aim of this talk is to review some asymptotic stability result for peakon solutions for CH-type equations as well as to present some new result for higher-order generalization of the CH equation.

  • PDE CDT Lunchtime Seminar

Pages

Add to My Calendar