Forthcoming Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
24 October 2019
16:00
Javier Fresán
Abstract

Guided by the analogy with certain moments of the Bessel function that appear as Feynman integrals, Broadhurst and Roberts recently studied a family of L-functions built up by assembling symmetric power moments of Kloosterman sums over finite fields. I will prove that these L-functions arise from potentially automorphic motives over the field of rational numbers, and hence admit a meromorphic continuation to the complex plane that satisfies the expected functional equation. If time permits, I will identify the periods of the corresponding motives with the Bessel moments and make a few comments about the special values of the L-functions. This is a joint work with Claude Sabbah and Jeng-Daw Yu.

  • Number Theory Seminar
24 October 2019
16:00
to
17:30
Abstract

Thin film flows of nematic liquid crystal will be considered, using the Leslie-Ericksen formulation for nematics. Our model can account for variations in substrate anchoring, which may exert a strong influence on patterns that arise in the flow. A number of simulations will be presented using an "in house" code, developed to run on a GPU. Current modeling directions involving flow over interlaced electrodes, so-called "dielectrowetting", will be discussed.

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
25 October 2019
10:00
Wayne Arter
Abstract

The challenge is to produce a reduced order model which predicts the maximum temperature rise of a thermally conducting object subjected to a power deposition profile supplied by an external code. The target conducting object is basically cuboidal but with one or more shaped faces and may have complex internal cooling structures, the deposition profile may be time dependent and exhibit hot spots and sharp edged shadows among other features. An additional feature is the importance of radiation which makes the problem nonlinear, and investigation of control strategies is also of interest. Overall there appears to be a sequence of problems of degree of difficulty sufficient to tax the most gifted student, starting with a line profile on a cuboid (quasi-2D) with linearised radiation term, and moving towards increased difficulty.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
25 October 2019
14:00
Abstract

We aim to establish and experimentally test mathematical models of embryogenesis. While the foundation of this research is based on models of isolated developmental events, the ultimate challenge is to formulate and understand dynamical systems encompassing multiple stages of development and multiple levels of regulation. These range from specific chemical reactions in single cells to coordinated dynamics of multiple cells during morphogenesis. Examples of our dynamical systems models of embryogenesis – from the events in the Drosophila egg to the early stages of gastrulation – will be presented. Each of these will demonstrate what had been learned from model analysis and model-driven experiments, and what further research directions are guided by these models.

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
25 October 2019
14:00
Dr Vicky Neale
Abstract

In this interactive workshop, we'll discuss what mathematicians are looking for in written solutions.  How can you set out your ideas clearly, and what are the standard mathematical conventions?  Please bring a pen or pencil! 

This session is likely to be most relevant for first-year undergraduates, but all are welcome.

25 October 2019
14:00
Abstract

Of the canonical stratified shear flow instabilities (Kelvin–Helmholtz, Holmboe-wave and Taylor–Caulfield), the Taylor–Caulfield instability (TCI) has received relatively little attention, and forms the focus of the presentation. A diagnostic of the linear instability dynamics is developed that exploits the net pseudomomentum to distinguish TCI from the other two instabilities for any given flow profile. Next, the nonlinear dynamics of TCI is shown across its range of unstable horizontal wavenumbers and bulk Richardson numbers. At small bulk Richardson numbers, a cascade of billow structures of sequentially smaller size may form. For large bulk Richardson numbers, the primary nonlinear travelling waves formed by the linear instability break down via a small-scale, Kelvin– Helmholtz-like roll-up mechanism with an associated large amount of mixing. In all cases, secondary parasitic nonlinear Holmboe waves appear at late times for high Prandtl number. Finally, a nonlinear diagnostic is proposed to distinguish between the saturated states of the three canonical instabilities based on their distinctive density–streamfunction and generalised vorticity–streamfunction relations.

  • Mathematical Geoscience Seminar
25 October 2019
16:00
David Gabai

Further Information: 

The Oxford Mathematics Colloquia are generously sponsored by Oxford University Press.

 

Abstract

We discuss a recent generalization of the classical 3-dimensional light bulb theorem to 4-dimensions. We connect this with fundamental questions about knotting of surfaces in 4-dimensional manifolds as well as new directions regarding knotting of 3-balls in 4-manifolds.

 

 

25 October 2019
17:30
Jon Chapman

Further Information: 

Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures 

Jon Chapman - Waves and resonance: from musical instruments to vacuum cleaners, via metamaterials and invisibility cloaks.

Friday 25 October 2019

5.30pm-6.30pm, Mathematical Institute, Oxford

Please email external-relations@maths.ox.ac.uk to register.

Watch live:
https://facebook.com/OxfordMathematics
https://livestream.com/oxuni/chapman

Jon Chapman is Professor of Mathematics and its Applications in Oxford.

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

28 October 2019
12:45
Noppadol Mekareeya
Abstract

A local SL(2,Z) transformation on the Type IIB brane configuration gives rise to an interesting class of 3d superconformal field theories, known as the S-fold SCFTs.  One of the interesting features of such a theory is that, in general, it does not admit a conventional Lagrangian description. Nevertheless, it can be described by a quiver diagram with a link being a superconformal field theory, known as the T(U(N)) theory. In this talk, we discuss various properties of the S-fold theories, including their supersymmetric indices, supersymmetry enhancement in the infrared, as well as several interesting dualities.
 

  • String Theory Seminar

Pages

Add to My Calendar