Forthcoming Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
5 November 2019
14:00
Maha Kaouri
Abstract

The variational data assimilation (VarDA) problem is usually solved using a method equivalent to Gauss-Newton (GN) to obtain the initial conditions for a numerical weather forecast. However, GN is not globally convergent and if poorly initialised, may diverge such as when a long time window is used in VarDA; a desirable feature that allows the use of more satellite data. To overcome this, we apply two globally convergent GN variants (line search & regularisation) to the long window VarDA problem and show when they locate a more accurate solution versus GN within the time and cost available.
Joint work with Coralia Cartis, Amos S. Lawless, Nancy K. Nichols.

  • Numerical Analysis Group Internal Seminar
5 November 2019
14:15
to
15:30
Dan Segal
Abstract

A mathematical structure is `axiomatizable' if it is completely determined by some family of sentences in a suitable first-order language. This idea has been explored for various kinds of structure, but I will concentrate on groups. There are some general results (not many) about which groups are or are not axiomatizable; recently there has been some interest in the sharper concept of 'finitely axiomatizable' or FA - that is, when only a finite set of sentences (equivalently, a single sentence) is allowed.

While an infinite group cannot be FA, every finite group is so, obviously. A profinite group is kind of in between: it is infinite (indeed, uncountable), but compact as a topological group; and these groups share many properties of finite groups, though sometimes for rather subtle reasons. I will discuss some recent work with Andre Nies and Katrin Tent where we prove that certain kinds of profinite group are FA among profinite groups. The methods involve a little model theory, and quite a lot of group theory.

 

5 November 2019
14:30
Sophy Oliver
Abstract

Ocean biogeochemical models used in climate change predictions are very computationally expensive and heavily parameterised. With derivatives too costly to compute, we optimise the parameters within one such model using derivative-free algorithms with the aim of finding a good optimum in the fewest possible function evaluations. We compare the performance of the evolutionary algorithm CMA-ES which is a stochastic global optimization method requiring more function evaluations, to the Py-BOBYQA and DFO-LS algorithms which are local derivative-free solvers requiring fewer evaluations. We also use initial Latin Hypercube sampling to then provide DFO-LS with a good starting point, in an attempt to find the global optimum with a local solver. This is joint work with Coralia Cartis and Samar Khatiwala.
 

  • Numerical Analysis Group Internal Seminar

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