Forthcoming Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
Today
12:00
Oliver Schlotterer
Abstract

In this talk, I will describe new mathematical structures in the low-energy  expansion of one-loop string amplitudes. The insertion of external states on the open- and closed-string worldsheets requires integration over punctures on a cylinder boundary and a torus, respectively. Suitable bases of such integrals will be shown to obey simple first-order differential equations in the modular parameter of the surface. These differential equations will be exploited  to perform the integrals order by order in the inverse string tension, similar to modern strategies for dimensionally regulated Feynman integrals. Our method manifests the appearance of iterated integrals over holomorphic  Eisenstein series in the low-energy expansion. Moreover, infinite families of Laplace equations can be generated for the modular forms in closed-string  low-energy expansions.
 

Today
12:00
Micheal Schaub
Abstract

In many applications we are confronted with the following scenario: we observe snapshots of data describing the state of a system at particular times, and based on these observations we want to infer the (dynamical) interactions between the entities we observe. However, often the number of samples we can obtain from such a process are far too few to identify the network exactly. Can we still reliable infer some aspects of the underlying system?
Motivated by this question we consider the following alternative system identification problem: instead of trying to infer the exact network, we aim to recover a (low-dimensional) statistical model of the network based on the observed signals on the nodes.  More concretely, here we focus on observations that consist of snapshots of a diffusive process that evolves over the unknown network. We model the (unobserved) network as generated from an independent draw from a latent stochastic block model (SBM), and our goal is to infer both the partition of the nodes into blocks, as well as the parameters of this SBM. We present simple spectral algorithms that provably solve the partition and parameter inference problems with high-accuracy.

Today
12:45
to
14:00
Oliver Sheridan-Methven
Abstract

Introducing cheap function proxies for quickly producing approximate random numbers, we show convergence of modified numerical schemes, and coupling between approximation and discretisation errors. We bound the cumulative roundoff error introduced by floating-point calculations, valid for 16-bit half-precision (FP16). We combine approximate distributions and reduced-precisions into a nested simulation framework (via multilevel Monte Carlo), demonstrating performance improvements achieved without losing accuracy. These simulations predominantly perform most of their calculations in very low precisions. We will highlight the motivations and design choices appropriate for SVE and FP16 capable hardware, and present numerical results on Arm, Intel, and NVIDIA based hardware.

 

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar
Today
14:00
Matthew Jenssen

Further Information: 

We present a detailed probabilistic and structural analysis of the set of weighted homomorphisms from the discrete torus Z_m^n, where m is even, to any fixed graph. Our main result establishes the "phase coexistence" phenomenon in a strong form: it shows that the corresponding probability distribution on such homomorphisms is close to a distribution defined constructively as a certain random perturbation of some "dominant phase". This has several consequences, including solutions (in a strong form) to conjectures of Engbers and Galvin and a conjecture of Kahn and Park. Special cases include sharp asymptotics for the number of independent sets and the number of proper q-colourings of Z_m^n (so in particular, the discrete hypercube). For the proof we develop a `Cluster Expansion Method', which we expect to have further applications, by combining machinery from statistical physics, entropy and graph containers. This is joint work with Peter Keevash.
 

 
  • Combinatorial Theory Seminar
Today
14:00
Yufei Zhang
Abstract

In this work, we propose a class of numerical schemes for solving semilinear Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman-Isaacs (HJBI) boundary value problems which arise naturally from exit time problems of diffusion processes with controlled drift. We exploit policy iteration to reduce the semilinear problem into a sequence of linear Dirichlet problems, which are subsequently approximated by a multilayer feedforward neural network ansatz. We establish that the numerical solutions converge globally in the H^2 -norm, and further demonstrate that this convergence is superlinear, by interpreting the algorithm as an inexact Newton iteration for the HJBI equation. Moreover, we construct the optimal feedback controls from the numerical value functions and deduce convergence. The numerical schemes and convergence results are then extended to oblique derivative boundary conditions. Numerical experiments on the stochastic Zermelo navigation problem and the perpetual American option pricing problems are presented to illustrate the theoretical results and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.
 

  • Numerical Analysis Group Internal Seminar
Today
14:15
Philippe Meyer
Abstract

The notion of colour Lie algebra, introduced by Ree (1960), generalises notions of Lie algebra and Lie superalgebra. From an orthogonal representation V of a quadratic colour Lie algebra g, we give various ways of constructing a colour Lie algebra g’ whose bracket extends the bracket of g and the action of g on V. A first possibility is to consider g’=g⊕V and requires the cancellation of an invariant studied by Kostant (1999). Another construction is possible when the representation is ``special’’ and in this case the extension is of the form g’=g⊕sl(2,k)⊕V⊗k^2. Covariants are associated to special representations and satisfy to particular identities generalising properties studied by Mathews (1911) on binary cubics. The 7-dimensional fundamental representation of a Lie algebra of type G_2 and the 8-dimensional spinor representation of a Lie algebra of type so(7) are examples of special representations.

Today
14:30
James Foster
Abstract

In this talk, I will present a strong (or pathwise) approximation of standard Brownian motion by a class of orthogonal polynomials. Most notably, the coefficients obtained from this expansion are independent Gaussian random variables. This will enable us to generate approximate Brownian paths by matching certain polynomial moments. To conclude the talk, I will discuss related works and applications to numerical methods for SDEs.
 

  • Numerical Analysis Group Internal Seminar
Today
15:30
Fabian Haiden
Abstract

Stability conditions on triangulated categories were introduced by Bridgeland, based on ideas from string theory. Conjecturally, they control existence of solutions to the deformed Hermitian Yang-Mills equation and the special Lagrangian equation (on the A-side and B-side of mirror symmetry, respectively). I will focus on the symplectic side and sketch a program which replaces special Lagrangians by "spectral networks", certain graphs enhanced with algebraic data. Based on joint work in progress with Katzarkov, Konstevich, Pandit, and Simpson.

  • Algebraic Geometry Seminar
Today
15:30
Benjamin Fahs
Abstract

We discuss asymptotics of Toeplitz determinants with Fisher--Hartwig singularities, and give an overview of past and more recent results.
Applications include the study of asymptotics of certain statistics of the characteristic polynomial of the Circular Unitary Ensemble (CUE) of random matrices. In particular recent results in the study of Toeplitz determinants allow for a proof of a conjecture by Fyodorov and Keating on moments of averages of the characteristic polynomial of the CUE.
 

  • Random Matrix Theory seminars
Today
17:00
Abraham Ng
Abstract

The well known Katznelson-Tzafriri theorem states that a power-bounded operator $T$ on a Banach space $X$ satisfies $\|T^n(I-T)\| \to 0$ as $n \to \infty$ if and only if the spectrum of $T$ touches the complex unit circle nowhere except possibly at the point $\{1\}$. As it turns out, the rate at which $\|T^n(I-T)\|$ goes to zero is largely determined by estimates on the resolvent of $T$ on the unit circle minus $\{1\}$ and not only is this interesting from a purely spectral and operator theoretic perspective, the applications of such quantified decay rates are myriad, ranging from the mean ergodic theorem to so-called alternating projections, from probability theory to continuous-in-time evolution equations. In this talk, we will trace the story of these so-called quantified Katznelson-Tzafriri theorems through previously known results up to the present, ending with a new result proved just a few weeks ago that largely completes the adventure.

  • Functional Analysis Seminar

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