Past Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar

21 May 2015
14:00
Abstract

The Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) of matrices and the related Principal Components Analysis (PCA) express a matrix in terms of singular vectors, which are linear combinations of all the input data and lack an intuitive physical interpretation. Motivated by the application of PCA and SVD in the analysis of populations genetics data, we will discuss the notion of leverage scores: a simple statistic that reveals columns/rows of a matrix that lie in the subspace spanned by the top principal components (left/right singular vectors). We will then use the leverage scores to present matrix decompositions that express the structure in a matrix in terms of actual columns (and/or rows) of the matrix. Such decompositions are easier to interpret in applications, since the selected columns and rows are subsets of the data. We will also discuss extensions of the leverage scores to reveal influential entries of a matrix.

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
14 May 2015
14:00
Frank Curtis
Abstract

We present a trust region algorithm for solving nonconvex optimization problems that, in the worst-case, is able to drive the norm of the gradient of the objective below a prescribed threshold $\epsilon > 0$ after at most ${\cal O}(\epsilon^{-3/2})$ function evaluations, gradient evaluations, or iterations.  Our work has been inspired by the recently proposed Adaptive Regularisation framework using Cubics (i.e., the ARC algorithm), which attains the same worst-case complexity bound.  Our algorithm is modeled after a traditional trust region algorithm, but employs modified step acceptance criteria and a novel trust region updating mechanism that allows it to achieve this desirable property.  Importantly, our method also maintains standard global and fast local convergence guarantees.

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
Dr. Jennifer Pestana
Abstract

Although Toeplitz matrices are often dense, matrix-vector products with Toeplitz matrices can be quickly performed via circulant embedding and the fast Fourier transform. This makes their solution by preconditioned Krylov subspace methods attractive. 

For a wide class of symmetric Toeplitz matrices, symmetric positive definite circulant preconditioners that cluster eigenvalues have been proposed. MINRES or the conjugate gradient method can be applied to these problems and descriptive convergence theory based on eigenvalues guarantees fast convergence. 

In contrast, although circulant preconditioners have been proposed for nonsymmetric Toeplitz systems, guarantees of fast convergence are generally only available for CG for the normal equations (CGNE). This is somewhat unsatisfactory because CGNE has certain drawbacks, including slow convergence and a larger condition number. In this talk we discuss a simple alternative symmetrization of nonsymmetric Toeplitz matrices, that allows us to use MINRES to solve the resulting linear system. We show how existing circulant preconditioners for nonsymmetric Toeplitz matrices can be straightforwardly adapted to this situation and give convergence estimates similar to those in the symmetric case.

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
30 April 2015
14:00
Abstract

Numerical simulation tools for fluid and solid mechanics are often based on the discretisation of coupled systems of partial differential equations, which can easily be identified in terms of physical
conservation laws.  In contrast, much physical insight is often gained from the equivalent formulation of the relevant energy or free-energy functional, possibly subject to constraints.  Motivated by the
nonlinear static and dynamic behaviour of nematic liquid crystals and of magnetosensitive elastomers, we propose a finite-element framework for minimising these free-energy functionals, using Lagrange multipliers to enforce additional constraints.  This talk will highlight challenges, limitations, and successes, both in the formulation of these models and their use in numerical simulation.
This is joint work with PhD students Thomas Benson, David Emerson, and Dong Han, and with James Adler, Timothy Atherton, and Luis Dorfmann.

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
12 March 2015
14:00
Professor Andrew Wathen
Abstract

Preconditioning is of significant importance in the solution of large dimensional systems of linear equations such as those that arise from the numerical solution of partial differential equation problems. In this talk we will attempt a broad ranging review of preconditioning.

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
John Pearson
Abstract

In this talk, we discuss the development of fast iterative solvers for matrix systems arising from various constrained optimization problems. In particular, we seek to exploit the saddle point structure of these problems to construct powerful preconditioners for the resulting systems, using appropriate approximations of the (1,1)-block and Schur complement.

The problems we consider arise from two well-studied subject areas within computational optimization. Specifically, we investigate the
numerical solution of PDE-constrained optimization problems, and the interior point method (IPM) solution of linear/quadratic programming
problems. Indeed a particular focus in this talk is the interior point method solution of PDE-constrained optimization problems with
additional inequality constraints on the state and control variables.

We present a range of optimization problems which we seek to solve using our methodology, and examine the theoretical and practical
convergence properties of our iterative methods for these problems.
 

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
26 February 2015
14:00
Dr Alexey Chernov
Abstract

Stability of the hp-Raviart-Thomas projection operator as a mapping H^1(K) -> H^1(K) on the unit cube K in R^3 has been addressed e.g. in [2], see also [1]. These results are suboptimal with respect to the polynomial degree. In this talk we present quasi-optimal stability estimates for the hp-Raviart-Thomas projection operator on the cube. The analysis involves elements of the polynomial approximation theory on an interval and the real method of Banach space interpolation.

(Joint work with Herbert Egger, TU Darmstadt)

[1] Mark Ainsworth and Katia Pinchedez. hp-approximation theory for BDFM and RT finite elements on quadrilaterals. SIAM J. Numer. Anal., 40(6):2047–2068 (electronic) (2003), 2002.

[2] Dominik Schötzau, Christoph Schwab, and Andrea Toselli. Mixed hp-DGFEM for incompressible flows. SIAM J. Numer. Anal., 40(6):2171–2194 (electronic) (2003), 2002.

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
19 February 2015
14:00
Dr Patrick Farrell
Abstract

Nonlinear systems of partial differential equations (PDEs) may permit several distinct solutions. The typical current approach to finding distinct solutions is to start Newton's method with many different initial guesses, hoping to find starting points that lie in different basins of attraction. In this talk, we present an infinite-dimensional deflation algorithm for systematically modifying the residual of a nonlinear PDE problem to eliminate known solutions from consideration. This enables the Newton--Kantorovitch iteration to converge to several different solutions, even starting from the same initial guess. The deflated Jacobian is dense, but an efficient preconditioning strategy is devised, and the number of Krylov iterations is observed not to grow as solutions are deflated. The technique is then applied to computing distinct solutions of nonlinear PDEs, tracing bifurcation diagrams, and to computing multiple local minima of PDE-constrained optimisation problems.

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
12 February 2015
14:00
Professor Christian Klingenberg
Abstract

In this talk we will describe the steps towards self-consistent computer simulations of the evolution of the universe beginning soon after the Big Bang and ending with the formation of realistic stellar systems like the Milky Way. This is a multi-scale problem of vast proportions. The first step has been the Millennium Simulation, one of the largest and most successful numerical simulations of the Universe ever carried out. Now we are in the midst of the next step, where this is carried to a much higher level of physical fidelity on the latest supercomputing platforms. This talk will be illustrate how the role of mathematics is essential in this endeavor. Also computer simulations will be shown. This is joint work among others with Volker Springel.

 

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
Dr Stefan Guettel
Abstract

Some problems in scientific computing, like the forward simulation of electromagnetic waves in geophysical prospecting, can be
solved via approximation of f(A)b, the action of a large matrix function f(A) onto a vector b. Iterative methods based on rational Krylov
spaces are powerful tools for these computations, and the choice of parameters in these methods is an active area of research.
We provide an overview of different approaches for obtaining optimal parameters, with an emphasis on the exponential and resolvent function, and the square root. We will discuss applications of the rational Arnoldi method for iteratively generating near-optimal absorbing boundary layers for indefinite Helmholtz problems, and for rational least squares vector fitting.

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar

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