Past Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops

19 June 2015
11:30
Alasdair Craighead
Abstract

G’s Growers supply salad and vegetable crops throughout the UK and Europe; primarily as a direct supplier to supermarkets. We are currently working on a project to improve the availability of Iceberg Lettuce throughout the year as this has historically been a very volatile crop. It is also by far the highest volume crop that we produce with typical weekly sales in the summer season being about 3m heads per week.

In order to continue to grow our business we must maintain continuous supply to the supermarkets. Our current method for achieving this is to grow more crop than we will actually harvest. We then aim to use the wholesale markets to sell the extra crop that is grown rather than ploughing it back in and then we reduce availability to these markets when the availability is tight.

We currently use a relatively simple computer Heat Unit model to help predict availability however we know that this is not the full picture. In order to try to help improve our position we have started the IceCAM project (Iceberg Crop Adaptive Model) which has 3 aims.

  1. Forecast crop availability spikes and troughs and use this to have better planting programmes from the start of the season.
  2. Identify the growth stages of Iceberg to measure more accurately whether crop is ahead or behind expectation when it is physically examined in the field.
  3. The final utopian aim would be to match the market so that in times of general shortage when price are high we have sufficient crop to meet all of our supermarket customer requirements and still have spare to sell onto the markets to benefit from the higher prices. Equally when there is a general surplus we would only look to have sufficient to supply the primary customer base.

We believe that statistical mathematics can help us to solve these problems!!

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
19 June 2015
10:00
Chris Kees
Abstract

Accurate simulation of coastal and hydraulic structures is challenging due to a range of complex processes such as turbulent air-water flow and breaking waves. Many engineering studies are based on scale models in laboratory flumes, which are often expensive and insufficient for fully exploring these complex processes. To extend the physical laboratory facility, the US Army Engineer Research and Development Center has developed a computational flume capability for this class of problems. I will discuss the turbulent air-water flow model equations, which govern the computational flume, and the order-independent, unstructured finite element discretization on which our implementation is based. Results from our air-water verification and validation test set, which is being developed along with the computational flume, demonstrate the ability of the computational flume to predict the target phenomena, but the test results and our experience developing the computational flume suggest that significant improvements in accuracy, efficiency, and robustness may be obtained by incorporating recent improvements in numerical methods.

Key Words:

Multiphase flow, Navier-Stokes, level set methods, finite element methods, water waves

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
12 June 2015
10:00
Darren Price
Abstract

A recommendation system for multi-modal journey planning could be useful to travellers in making their journeys more efficient and pleasant, and to transport operators in encouraging travellers to make more effective use of infrastructure capacity.

Journeys will have multiple quantifiable attributes (e.g. time, cost, likelihood of getting a seat) and other attributes that we might infer indirectly (e.g. a pleasant view).  Individual travellers will have different preferences that will affect the most appropriate recommendations.  The recommendation system might build profiles for travellers, quantifying their preferences.  These could be inferred indirectly, based on the information they provide, choices they make and feedback they give.  These profiles might then be used to compare and rank different travel options.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
29 May 2015
10:00
Abstract

Classically, basin modelling is undertaken with very little a priori knowledge. Alongside the challenge of improving the general fidelity and utility of the modelling systems, is the challenge of constraining these systems with unknowns and uncertainties in such a way that models (and derived simulation results) can be readily regenerated/reevaluated in the light of new empirical data obtained during the course of exploration, development and production activities.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
20 March 2015
10:00
Paul Leplay
Abstract

For this workshop, we have identified two subject of interest for us in the field of particle technology, one the wet granulation is a size enlargement process of converting small-diameter solid particles (typically powders) into larger-diameter agglomerates to generate a specific size, the other one the mechanical centrifugal air classifier is employed when the particle size that you need to separate is too fine to screen.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
6 March 2015
10:00
Mike Newman
Abstract

The behaviour of complex processing systems is often controlled by large numbers of parameters.  For example, one Thales radar processor has over 2000 adjustable parameters.  Evaluating the performance for each set of parameters is typically time-consuming, involving either simulation or processing of large recorded data sets (or both).  In processing recorded data, the optimum parameters for one data set are unlikely to be optimal for another.

We would be interested in discussing mathematical techniques that could make the process of optimisation more efficient and effective, and what we might learn from a more mathematical approach.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops

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