Past Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops

17 November 2017
10:00
Jonathan Welton
Abstract

The costs to Vodafone of calls terminating on other networks – especially fixed networks – are largely determined by the termination charges levied by other telecoms operators.  We interconnect to several other telecoms operators, who charge differently; within one interconnect operator, costs vary depending on which of their switching centres we deliver calls to, and what the terminating phone number is.  So, while these termination costs depend partly on factors that we cannot control (such as the number called, the call duration and the time of day), they are also influenced by some factors that we can control.  In particular, we can route calls within our network before handing them over from our network to the other telecoms operator; where this “handover” occurs has an impact on termination cost.  
Vodafone would like to develop a repeatable capability to determine call delivery cost efficiency and identify where network routing changes can be made to improve matters, and determine traffic growth forecasts.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
3 November 2017
10:00
Graham Scott
Abstract

Railway traffic management is the combination of monitoring the progress of trains, forecasting of the likely future progression of trains, and evaluating the impact of intervention options in near real time in order to make traffic adjustments that minimise the combined delay of trains when measured against the planned timetable.

In a time of increasing demand for rail travel, the desire to maximise the usage of the available infrastructure capacity competes with the need for contingency space to allow traffic management when disruption occurs. Optimisation algorithms and decision support tools therefore need to be increasingly sophisticated and traffic management has become a crucial function in meeting the growing expectations of rail travellers for punctuality and quality of service.

Resonate is a technology company specialising in rail and connected transport solutions. We have embarked on a drive to maximise capacity and performance through the use of mathematical, statistical, data-driven and machine learning based methods driving decision support and automated traffic management solutions.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
27 October 2017
10:00
Padraig Regan
Abstract

In certain business environments, it is essential to the success of the business that workers stick closely to their plans and are not distracted, diverted or stopped. A warehouse is a great example of this for businesses where customers order goods online and the merchants commit to delivery dates.  In a warehouse, somewhere, a team of workers are scheduled to pick the items which will make up those orders and get them shipped on time.  If the workers do not deliver to plan, then orders will not be shipped on time, reputations will be damaged, customer will be lost and companies will go out of business.

StayLinked builds software which measures what these warehouse workers do and measures the factors which cause them to be distracted, diverted or stopped.  We measure whenever they start or end a task or process (e.g. start an order, pick an item in an order, complete an order). Some of the influencing factors we measure include the way the worker interacts with the device (using keyboard, scanner, gesture), navigates through the application (screens 1-3-4-2 instead of 1-2-3-4), the performance of the battery (dead battery stops work), the performance of the network (connected to access point or not, high or low latency), the device types being used, device form factor, physical location (warehouse 1, warehouse 2), profile of worker, etc.

We are seeking to build a configurable real-time mathematical model which will allow us to take all these factors into account and confidently demonstrate a measure of their impact (positive or negative) on the business process and therefore on the worker’s productivity. We also want to alert operational staff as soon as we can identify that important events have happened.  These alerts can then be quickly acted upon and problems resolved at the earliest possible opportunity.

In this project, we would like to collaborate with the maths faculty to understand the appropriate mathematical techniques and tools to use to build this functionality.  This product is being used right now by our customers so it would also be a great opportunity for a student to quickly see the results of their work in action in a real-world environment.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
9 June 2017
10:00
Stephane Chretien
Abstract

The National Physical Laboratory is the national measurement institute. Researchers in the Data Science Division analyse various types of data using mathematical, statistical and machine learning based methods. The goal of the workshop is to describe a set of exciting mathematical problems that are of interest to NPL and more generally to the Data Science community. In particular, I will describe the problem of clustering using minimum spanning trees (MST-Clustering), Non-Negative Matrix Factorisation (NMF), adaptive Compressed Sensing (CS) for tomography, and sparse polynomial chaos expansion (PCE) for parametrised PDE’s.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
19 May 2017
10:00
Abstract

Conventional neutron reflection is a very powerful tool to characterise surfactants, polymers and other materials at the solid/liquid and air/liquid interfaces. Usually the analysis considers molecular layers with coherent addition of reflected waves that give the resultant reflected intensity. In this short workshop talk I will illustrate recent developments in this approach to address a wide variety of challenges of academic and commercial interest. Specifically I will introduce the challenges of using substrates that are thick on the coherence lengthscale of the radiation and the issues that brings in the structural analysis. I also invite the audience to consider if there may be some mathematical analysis that might lead us to exploit this incoherence to optimise our analysis. In particular, facilitating the removal of the 'background substrate contribution' to help us focus on the adsorbed layers of most interest.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
5 May 2017
10:00
Apala Majumdar
Abstract

Liquid crystals are classical examples of mesophases or materials that are intermediate in character between conventional solids and liquids. There are different classes of liquid crystals and we focus on the simplest and most widely used nematic liquid crystals. Nematic liquid crystals are simply put, anisotropic liquids with distinguished directions and are the working material of choice for the multi-billion dollar liquid crystal display industry. In this workshop, we briefly review the mathematical theories for nematic liquid crystals, the modelling framework and some recent work on modelling experiments on confined liquid crystalline systems conducted by the Aarts Group (Chemistry Oxford) and experiments on nematic microfluidics by Anupam Sengupta (ETH Zurich). This is joint work with Alexander Lewis, Peter Howell, Dirk Aarts, Ian Griffiths, Maria Crespo Moya and Angel Ramos.
We conclude with a brief overview of new experiments on smectic liquid crystals in the Aarts laboratory and questions related to the recycling of liquid crystal displays originating from informal discussions with Votechnik ( a company dealing with automated recycling technologies , http://votechnik.com/).
 

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops

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