Past Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops

5 November 2010
09:00
to
11:00
Steve Roberts and his group
Abstract
PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS WORKSHOP IS TO BE HELD IN 21 BANBURY ROAD BEGINNING AT 9AM! \\ We will give three short presentations of current work here on small scale mechanics : 1) micron-scale cantilever testing and nanoindentation - Dave Armstrong 2) micron-scale pillar compression – Ele Grieveson 3) Dislocation loop shapes – Steve Fitzgerald These should all provide fuel for discussion, and I hope ideas for future collaborative work.\\ The meeting will be in the committee room in 21 Banbury Rd (1st floor, West end).
  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
29 October 2010
11:45
John Allen and Angela Mihai
Abstract

John Allen: The Bennett Pinch revisited

Abstract: The original derivation of the well-known Bennett relation is presented. Willard H. Bennett developed a theory, considering both electric and magnetic fields within a pinched column, which is completely different from that found in the textbooks. The latter theory is based on simple magnetohydrodynamics which ignores the electric field.

The discussion leads to the interesting question as to whether the possibility of purely electrostatic confinement should be seriously considered.

Angela Mihai: A mathematical model of coupled chemical and electrochemical processes arising in stress corrosion cracking

Abstract: A general mathematical model for the electrochemistry of corrosion in a long and narrow metal crack is constructed by extending classical kinetic models to also incorporate physically realistic kinematic conditions of metal erosion and surface film growth. In this model, the electrochemical processes are described by a system of transport equations coupled through an electric field, and the movement of the metal surface is caused, on the one hand, by the corrosion process, and on the other hand, by the undermining action of a hydroxide film, which forms by consuming the metal substrate. For the model problem, approximate solutions obtained via a combination of analytical and numerical methods indicate that, if the diffusivity of the metal ions across the film increases, a thick unprotective film forms, while if the rate at which the hydroxide produces is increased, a thin passivating film develops.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
29 October 2010
10:00
to
11:15
Abstract
We will try to cover the following problems in the workshop: (1) Modelling of aortic aneurisms showing the changes in blood flow / wall loads before and after placements of aortic stents; (2) Modelling of blood flows / wall loads in interracial aneurisms when flow diverters are used; (3) Metal artefact reduction in computer tomography (CT). If we run out of time the third topic may be postponed.
  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
2 July 2010
11:45
to
13:00
Eurico COVAS
Abstract
This workshop is half-seminar, half-workshop. \\ \\ HSBC have an on-going problem and they submitted a proposal for an MSc in Applied Stats project on this topic. Unfortunately, the project was submitted too late for this cohort of students. Eurico will talk about "the first approach at the problem" but please be aware that it is an open problem which requires further work. Eurico's abstract is as follows. \\ \\ This article examines modelling yield curves through chaotic dynamical systems whose dynamics can be unfolded using non-linear embeddings in higher dimensions. We then refine recent techniques used in the state space reconstruction of spatially extended time series in order to forecast the dynamics of yield curves. We use daily LIBOR GBP data (January 2007-June 2008) in order to perform forecasts over a 1-month horizon. Our method seems to outperform random walk and other benchmark models on the basis of mean square forecast error criteria.
  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
4 June 2010
10:00
to
13:00
Andy Stove
Abstract
'Compressive sampling' is a topic of current interest. It relies on data being sparse in some domain, which allows what is apparently 'sub Nyquist' sampling so that the quantities of data which must be handled become more closely related to the information rate. This principal would appear to have (at least) three applications for radar and electronic warfare: \\ The most modest application is to reduce the amount of data which we must handle: radar and electronic warfare receivers generate vast amounts of data (up to 1Gbit/second or even 10Gbit.sec). It is desirable to be able to store this data for future analysis and it is also becoming increasingly important to be able to share it between different sensors, which, prima facie, requires vast communication bandwidths and it would be valuable to be able to find ways to handle this more efficiently. \\ The second advantage is that if suitable data domains can be identified, it may also be possible to pre-process the data before the analogue to digital converters in the receivers, to reduce the demands on these critical components. \\ The most ambitious use of compressive sensing would be to find ways of modifying the radar waveforms, and the electronic warfare receiver sampling strategies, to change the domain in which the information is represented to reduce the data rates at the receiver 'front ends', i.e. make the data at the front end better match the information we really want to acquire.\\ The aim of the presentation will be to describe the issues with which we are faced, and to discuss how compressive sampling might be able to help. A particular issue which will be raised is how we might find domains in which the data is sparse.
  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops

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