Past Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar

1 November 2016
12:45
Doireann O'Kiely
Abstract

Thin glass sheets are used in smartphone, battery and semiconductor technology, and may be manufactured by first producing a relatively thick glass slab (known as a preform) and subsequently redrawing it to a required thickness. Theoretically, if the sheet is redrawn through an infinitely long heater zone, a product with the same aspect ratio as the preform may be manufactured. However, in reality the effect of surface tension and the restriction to factories of finite size prevent this. In this talk I will present a mathematical model for a viscous sheet undergoing redraw, and use asymptotic analysis in the thin-sheet, low-Reynolds-number limit to investigate how the product shape is affected by process parameters. 

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar
18 October 2016
12:45
Niall Bootland
Abstract

My research focuses on numerical techniques that help provide scalable computation within simulations of two-phase fluid flow problems. The efficient solution of the linear systems which arise is key to obtaining practical computation. I will motivate and discuss new methods which seek to generalise effective techniques for a single phase to the more challenging setting of two-phase flow where the governing equations have discontinuous coefficients.

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar
17 May 2016
12:45
Arnold Mathijssen
Abstract

Interactions between micro-swimmers and their complex flow environments are important in many biological systems, such as sperm cells swimming in cervical mucus or bacteria in biofilm initiation areas. We present a theoretical model describing the dynamics of micro-organisms swimming in a plane Poiseuille flow of a viscoelastic fluid, accounting for hydrodynamic interactions and biological noise. General non-Newtonian effects are investigated, including shear-thinning and normal stress differences that lead to migration of the organisms across the streamlines of the background flow. We show that micro-swimmers are driven towards the centre-line of the channel, even if countered by hydrodynamic interactions with the channel walls that typically lead to boundary accumulation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the normal stress differences reorient the swimmers at the centre-line in the direction against the flow so that they swim upstream. This suggests a natural sorting mechanism to select swimmers with a given swimming speed larger than the tunable Poiseuille flow velocity. This framework is then extended to study trapping and colony formation of pathogens near surfaces, in corners and crevices. 

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar
3 May 2016
13:00
Abstract

We consider the motion of a thin liquid drop on a smooth substrate as the drop evaporates into an inert gas. Many experiments suggest that, at times close to the drop’s extinction, the drop radius scales as the square root of the time remaining until extinction. However, other experiments observe slightly different scaling laws. We use the method of matched asymptotic expansions to investigate whether this different behaviour is systematic or an artefact of experiment.

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar

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