Past Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar

27 November 2018
12:45
Hamza Alawiye
Abstract

Wrinkling is a universal instability occurring in a wide variety of engineering and biological materials. It has been studied extensively for many different systems but a full description is still lacking. Here, we provide a systematic analysis of the wrinkling of a thin hyperelastic film over a substrate in plane strain using stream functions. For comparison, we assume that wrinkling is generated either by the isotropic growth of the film or by the lateral compression of the entire system. We perform an exhaustive linear analysis of the wrinkling problem for all stiffness ratios and under a variety of additional boundary and material effects.

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar
13 November 2018
12:45
Abstract

In gas-liquid two-phase pipe flows, flow regime transition is associated with changes in the micro-scale geometry of the flow. In particular, the bubbly-slug transition is associated with the coalescence and break-up of bubbles in a turbulent pipe flow. We consider a sequence of models designed to facilitate an understanding of this process. The simplest such model is a classical coalescence model in one spatial dimension. This is formulated as a stochastic process involving nucleation and subsequent growth of ‘seeds’, which coalesce as they grow. We study the evolution of the bubble size distribution both analytically and numerically. We also present some ideas concerning ways in which the model can be extended to more realistic two- and three-dimensional geometries.

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar
30 October 2018
12:45
Abstract

As a rule of thumb, the dominant resistive force on a cyclist riding along a flat road at a speed above 10mph is aerodynamic drag; at higher speeds, this drag becomes even more influential because of its non-linear dependence on speed. Reducing drag, therefore, is of critical importance in bicycle racing, where winning margins are frequently less than a tyre's width (over a 200+km race!). I shall discuss a mathematical model of aerodynamic drag in cycling, present mathematical reasoning behind some of the decisions made by racing cyclists when attempting to minimise it, and touch upon some of the many methods of aerodynamic drag assessment.

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar
12 June 2018
12:45
Lindon Roberts
Abstract

Structure from Motion (SfM) is a problem which asks: given photos of an object from different angles, can we reconstruct the object in 3D? This problem is important in computer vision, with applications including urban planning and autonomous navigation. A key part of SfM is bundle adjustment, where initial estimates of 3D points and camera locations are refined to match the images. This results in a high-dimensional nonlinear least-squares problem. In this talk, I will discuss how dimensionality reduction methods such as block coordinates and sketching can be used to improve solver scalability for bundle adjustment problems.

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar
29 May 2018
12:45
Caoimhe Rooney
Abstract

Calcination describes the heat treatment of anthracite particles in a furnace to produce a partially-graphitised material which is suitable for use in electrodes and for other met- allurgical applications. Electric current is passed through a bed of anthracite particles, here referred to as a coke bed, causing Ohmic heating and high temperatures which result in the chemical and structural transformation of the material.

Understanding the behaviour of such mechanisms on the scale of a single particle is often dealt with through the use of computational models such as DEM (Discrete Element Methods). However, because of the great discrepancy between the length scale of the particles and the length scale of the furnace, we can exploit asymptotic homogenisation theory to simplify the problem.  

In this talk, we will present some results relating to the electrical and thermal conduction through granular material which define effective quantities for the conductivities by considering a microscopic representative volume within the material. The effective quantities are then used as parameters in the homogenised macroscopic model to describe calcination of anthracite. 

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar
15 May 2018
12:45
Thomas Chandler
Abstract

It is known that in steady-state potential flows, the separation of a gravity-driven free-surface from a solid exhibits a number of peculiar characteristics. For example, it can be shown that the fluid must separate from the body so as to form one of three possible in-fluid angles: (i) 180°, (ii) 120°, or (iii) an angle such that the surface is locally perpendicular to the direction of gravity. These necessary separation conditions were notably remarked by Dagan & Tulin (1972) in the context of ship hydrodynamics [J. Fluid Mech., 51(3) pp. 520-543], but they are of crucial importance in many potential flow applications. It is not particularly well understood why there is such a drastic change in the local separation behaviours when the global flow is altered. The question that motivates this work is the following: outside a formal balance-of-terms arguments, why must (i) through (iii) occur and furthermore, what is the connections between them?

              In this work, we seek to explain the transitions between the three cases in terms of the singularity structure of the associated solutions once they are extended into the complex plane. A numerical scheme is presented for the analytic continuation of a vertical jet (or alternatively a rising bubble). It will be shown that the transition between the three cases can be predicted by observing the coalescence of singularities as the speed of the jet is modified. A scaling law is derived for the coalescence rate of singularities.

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar
1 May 2018
12:45
Abinand Gopal
Abstract

Over the past decade, the randomized singular value decomposition (RSVD)
algorithm has proven to be an efficient, reliable alternative to classical
algorithms for computing low-rank approximations in a number of applications.
However, in cases where no information is available on the singular value
decay of the data matrix or the data matrix is known to be close to full-rank,
the RSVD is ineffective. In recent years, there has been great interest in
randomized algorithms for computing full factorizations that excel in this
regime.  In this talk, we will give a brief overview of some key ideas in
randomized numerical linear algebra and introduce a new randomized algorithm for
computing a full, rank-revealing URV factorization.

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar
6 March 2018
12:45
Abstract

Collective neural crest (NC) cell migration determines the formation of peripheral tissues during vertebrate development. If NC cells fail to reach a target or populate an incorrect location, improper cell differentiation or uncontrolled cell proliferation can occur. Therefore, knowledge of embryonic cell migration is important for understanding birth defects and tumour formation. However, the response of NC cells to different stimuli, and their ability to migrate to distant targets, are still poorly understood. Recently, experimental and computational studies have provided evidence that there are at least two subpopulations of NC cells, namely “leading” and “trailing” cells, with potential further differentiation between the cells in these subpopulations [1,2]. The main difference between these two cell types is the mechanism driving motility and invasion: the leaders follow the gradient of a chemoattractant, while the trailing cells follow “gradients” of the leaders. The precise mechanisms underlying these leader-follower interactions are still unclear.

We develop and apply innovative multi-scale modelling frameworks to analyse signalling effects on NC cell dynamics. We consider different potential scenarios and investigate them using an individual-based model for the cell motility and reaction-diffusion model to describe chemoattractant dynamics. More specifically, we use a discrete self-propelled particle model [3] to capture the interactions between the cells and incorporate volume exclusion. Streaming migration is represented using an off-lattice model to generate realistic cell arrangements and incorporate nonlinear behaviour of the system, for example the coattraction between cells at various distances. The simulations are performed using Aboria, which is a C++ library for the implementation of particle-based numerical methods [4]. The source of chemoattractant, the characteristics of domain growth, and types of boundary conditions are some other important factors that affect migration. We present results on how robust/sensitive cells invasion is to these key biological processes and suggest further avenues of experimental research.

 

[1] R. McLennan, L. Dyson, K. W. Prather, J. A. Morrison, R.E. Baker, P. K. Maini and P. M. Kulesa. (2012). Multiscale mechanisms of cell migration during development: theory and experiment, Development, 139, 2935-2944.

[2] R. McLennan, L. J. Schumacher, J. A. Morrison, J. M. Teddy, D. A. Ridenour, A. C. Box, C. L. Semerad, H. Li, W. McDowell, D. Kay, P. K. Maini, R. E. Baker and P. M. Kulesa. (2015). Neural crest migration is driven by a few trailblazer cells with a unique molecular signature narrowly confined to the invasive front, Development, 142, 2014-2025.

[3] G. Grégoire, H. Chaté and Y Tu. (2003). Moving and staying together without a leader, Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena, 181, 157-170.

[4] M. Robinson and M. Bruna. (2017). Particle-based and meshless methods with Aboria, SoftwareX, 6, 172-178. Online documentation https://github.com/martinjrobins/Aboria.

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar
20 February 2018
12:45
Abstract

Protein interaction networks (PINs) allow the representation and analysis of biological processes in cells. Because cells are dynamic and adaptive, these processes change over time. Thus far, research has focused either on the static PIN analysis or the temporal nature of gene expression. By analysing temporal PINs using multilayer networks, we want to link these efforts. The analysis of temporal PINs gives insights into how proteins, individually and in their entirety, change their biological functions. We present a general procedure that integrates temporal gene expression information with a monolayer PIN to a temporal PIN and allows the detection of modular structure using multilayer modularity maximisation.

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar

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