Past Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar

27 February 2015
14:00
Dr Steven Niederer
Abstract

Computational models of the heart have been primarily developed to simulate, analyse and understand experimental measurements. Increasingly biophysical models are being used to understand cardiac disease and pathologies in patients. This shift from laboratory to clinical contexts requires the development of new modelling frameworks to simulate pathological states that invalidate assumptions in existing modelling frameworks, work flows to integrate multiple data sets to constrain model parameters and an understanding of the clinical questions that models can answer. We report on the development and application of biophysical modelling frameworks representing the cardiac electrical and mechanical systems, which are currently being customised for modelling cardiac pathologies.

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
13 February 2015
14:00
Dr Chris Sander & Prof Debra Marks
Abstract

Genomic sequences contain rich evolutionary information about functional constraints on macromolecules such as proteins. This information can be efficiently mined to detect evolutionary couplings between residues in proteins and address the long-standing challenge to compute protein three-dimensional structures from amino acid sequences. Substantial progress on this problem has become possible because of the explosive growth in available sequences and the application of global statistical methods. In addition to three-dimensional structure, the improved analysis of covariation helps identify functional residues involved in ligand binding, protein-complex formation and conformational changes. We expect computation of covariation patterns to complement experimental structural biology in elucidating the full spectrum of protein structures, their functional interactions and evolutionary dynamics. Use the http://evfold.org  server to compute EVcouplings and to predict 3D structure for large sequence families. References:  http://bit.ly/tob48p - Protein 3D Structure from high-throughput sequencing;  http://bit.ly/1DSqANO - 3D structure of transmembrane proteins from evolutionary constraints; http://bit.ly/1zyYpE7 - Sequence co-evolution gives 3D contacts and structures of protein complexes.

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
28 November 2014
14:00
Dr Anotida Madzvamuse
Abstract
Cell migration is of vital importance in many biological studies, hence robust cell tracking algorithms are needed for inference of dynamic features from (static) in vivo and in vitro experimental imaging data of cells migrating. In recent years much attention has been focused on the modelling of cell motility from physical principles and the development of state-of-the art numerical methods for the simulation of the model equations. Despite this, the vast majority of cell tracking algorithms proposed to date focus solely on the imaging data itself and do not attempt to incorporate any physical knowledge on cell migration into the tracking procedure. In this study, we present a mathematical approach for cell tracking, in which we formulate the cell tracking problem as an inverse problem for fitting a mathematical model for cell motility to experimental imaging data. The novelty of this approach is that the physics underlying the model for cell migration is encoded in the tracking algorithm. To illustrate this we focus on an example of Zebrafish (Danio rerio's larvae} Neutrophil migration and contrast an ad-hoc approach to cell tracking based on interpolation with the model fitting approach we propose in this talk.
  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar

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