Past Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar

9 June 2017
14:00
Abstract

Building on advancements in computer vision we now have an array of visual tracking methods that allow the reliable estimation of cellular motion in high-throughput settings as well as more complex biological specimens. In many cases the underlying assumptions of these methods are still not well defined and result in failures when analysing large scale experiments.

Using organotypic co-culture systems we can now mimic more physiologically relevant microenvironments in vitro.  The robust analysis of cellular dynamics in such complex biological systems remains an open challenge. I will attempt to outline some of these challenges and provide some very preliminary results on analysing more complex cellular behaviours.

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
2 June 2017
14:00
Abstract

In the first part of my presentation, I will briefly summarize a dynamic view of the cell cycle created in collaboration with Prof John Tyson over the past 25 years. 
In our view, the decisions a cell must make during DNA synthesis and mitosis are controlled by bistable switches, which provide abrupt and irreversible transition 
between successive cell cycle phases. In addition, bistability provides the foundation for 'checkpoints' that can stop cell proliferation if problems arise 
(e.g., DNA damage by UV irradiation). In the second part of my talk, I will highlight a few representative examples from our ongoing BBSRC Strategic LoLa grant 
(http://cellcycle.org.uk/) in which we are testing the predictions of our theoretical ideas in human cells in collaboration with four experimental groups.

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
26 May 2017
14:45
to
16:30
Dr Roman Fischer QBIOX Colloquium
Abstract

Proteomics is seen as the next logical step after genomics to understand life processes at the molecular level. With increasing capabilities of modern mass spectrometers the deep proteome (>8000 proteins detected) has become widely accessible, only to be replaced recently by the "Ultra-deep proteome" with ~14000 proteins detected in a single cell line. Furthermore, new data search algorithms and sample preparation methods allow not only to achieve comprehensive sequence coverage for the majority of proteins, but also to detect protein variations and single amino acid polymorphisms in proteins, further linking genomic variation to protein phenotypes. The combination of genomic and proteomic information on individual (patient) level could mark the beginning of the "Post-Proteomic Era".

Please register via https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/qbiox-colloquium-trinity-term-2017-ticket...

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
26 May 2017
14:00
Professor Irena Udalova QBIOX Colloquium
Abstract

The ability to study the transcriptome, proteome – and other aspects – of many individual cells represents one of the most important technical breakthroughs and tools in biology and medical science of the past few years. They are revolutionising study of biological systems and human disease, enabling for example: hypothesis-free identification of rare pathogenic (or protective) cell subsets in chronic diseases, routine monitoring of patient immune phenotypes and direct discovery of mole cular targets in rare cell populations. In parallel, new computational and analytical approaches are being intensively developed to analyse the vast data sets generated by these technologies. However, there is still a huge gap between our ability to generate the data, analyse their technical soundness and actually interpret them. The QBIOX network may provide for a unique opportunity to complement recent investments in Oxford technical capabilities in single-cell technologies with the development of revolutionary, visionary ways of interpreting the data that would help Oxford researchers to compete as leaders in this field.

Please register via https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/qbiox-colloquium-trinity-term-2017-ticket...

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
19 May 2017
14:00
Abstract

Biomedical research and clinical practice rely on complex and multimodality

datasets for the characterisation of human organs in health and disease. In

computational biomedicine, we often argue that multiscale computational

models are and will be increasingly required as tools for data integration,

for probing the established knowledge of physiological systems, and for

predictions of the effects of therapies and disease. But what has

computational biomedicine delivered so far? This presentation will describe

successes, failures and future directions of computational models in

cardiac research from basic to translational science.

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
5 May 2017
14:00
Abstract

All data intelligence processes are designed for processing a finite amount of data within a time period. In practice, they all encounter
some difficulties, such as the lack of adequate techniques for extracting meaningful information from raw data; incomplete, incorrect 
or noisy data; biases encoded in computer algorithms or biases of human analysts; lack of computational resources or human resources; urgency in 
making a decision; and so on. While there is a great enthusiasm to develop automated data intelligence processes, it is also known that
many of such processes may suffer from the phenomenon of data processing inequality, which places a fundamental doubt on the credibility of these 
processes. In this talk, the speaker will discuss the recent development of an information-theoretic measure (by Chen and Golan) for optimizing 
the cost-benefit ratio of a data intelligence process, and will illustrate its applicability using examples of data analysis and 
visualization processes including some in bioinformatics.

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
28 April 2017
14:00
Abstract

The management of natural resources, from fisheries and climate change to gut bacteria colonies, all require the development of ecological models that represent the full spectrum of population interactions, from competition, through mixotrophy and mutualism, to predation.

Mixotrophic plankton, that both photosynthesise and eat other plankton, underpin all marine food webs and help regulate climate by facilitating gas exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. We show the recent discovery that their feeding preferences change with increasing temperature implies climate change could dramatically alter the structure of marine food webs.

We describe a theoretical framework that reveals the key role of mixotrophy in facilitating transitions between trophic interactions. Mixotrophy smoothly and stably links competition to predation, and extends this linkage to include mutualism in both facultative and obligate forms. Such smooth stable transitions further allow the development of eco-evolutionary theory at the population level through quantitative trait modelling.

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
3 March 2017
14:45
Abstract

Regenerative medicine offers great hope in curing many currently untreatable diseases. Tissue engineering and stem cell therapy are the two main components of regenerative medicine. In this talk, I will discuss how engineering can make contributions to this highly interdisciplinary field, including biomaterials as 3D scaffolds, bioreactor design, and stem cell bioprocessing.

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar

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