Past Number Theory Seminar

28 January 2016
16:00
David Loeffler
Abstract

Iwasawa theory is a powerful technique for relating the behaviour of arithmetic objects to the special values of L-functions. Iwasawa originally developed this theory in order to study the class groups of number fields, but it has since been generalised to many other settings. In this talk, I will discuss some new results in the Iwasawa theory of the symmetric square of a modular form. This is a joint project with Sarah Zerbes, and the main tool in this work is the Euler system of Beilinson-Flach elements, constructed in our earlier works with Kings and Lei.

  • Number Theory Seminar
21 January 2016
16:00
Abstract

Given a family $F$ of elliptic curves defined over $Q$, we are interested in the set $H(Y)$ of curves $E$ in $F$, of positive rank, and for which the minimum of the canonical heights of non-torsion rational points on $E$ is bounded by some parameter $Y$. When one can show that this set is finite, it is natural to investigate statistical properties of arithmetic objects attached to elliptic curves in the set $H(Y)$. We will describe some problems related to this, and will state some results in the case of families of quadratic twists of a fixed elliptic curve.

  • Number Theory Seminar
3 December 2015
16:00
Francis Brown
Abstract

A period is a certain type of number obtained by integrating algebraic differential forms over algebraic domains. Examples include pi, algebraic numbers, values of the Riemann zeta function at integers, and other classical constants.
Difficult transcendence conjectures due to Grothendieck suggest that there should be a Galois theory of periods.
I will explain these notions in very introductory terms and show how to set up such a Galois theory in certain situations.
I will then discuss some applications, in particular to Kim's method for bounding $S$-integral solutions to the equation $u+v=1$, and possibly to high-energy physics.

  • Number Theory Seminar
26 November 2015
16:00
Abstract

The number of steps required by the Euclidean algorithm to find the greatest common divisor of a pair of integers $u,v$ with $1<u<v<n$ has been investigated since at least the 16th century, with an asymptotic for the mean number of steps being found independently by H. Heilbronn and J.D. Dixon in around 1970. It was subsequently shown by D. Hensley in 1994 that the number of steps asymptotically follows a normal distribution about this mean. Existing proofs of this fact rely on extensive effective estimates on the Gauss-Kuzman-Wirsing operator which run to many dozens of pages. I will describe how this central limit theorem can be obtained instead by a much shorter Tauberian argument. If time permits, I will discuss some related work on the number of steps for the binary Euclidean algorithm.

  • Number Theory Seminar
19 November 2015
16:00
Abstract

The prime number race is the competition between different coprime residue classes mod $q$ to contain the most primes, up to a point $x$ . Rubinstein and Sarnak showed, assuming two $L$-function conjectures, that as $x$ varies the problem is equivalent to a problem about orderings of certain random variables, having weak correlations coming from number theory. In particular, as $q \rightarrow \infty$ the number of primes in any fixed set of $r$ coprime classes will achieve any given ordering for $\sim 1/r!$ values of $x$. In this talk I will try to explain what happens when $r$ is allowed to grow as a function of $q$. It turns out that one still sees uniformity of orderings in many situations, but not always. The proofs involve various probabilistic ideas, and also some harmonic analysis related to the circle method. This is joint work with Youness Lamzouri.

  • Number Theory Seminar
5 November 2015
16:00
Kaisa Matomäki
Abstract

The Möbius function plays a central role in number theory; both the prime number theorem and the Riemann Hypothesis are naturally formulated in terms of the amount of cancellations one gets when summing the Möbius function. In a recent joint work with Maksym Radziwill we have shown that the sum of the Möbius function exhibits cancellation in "almost all intervals" of arbitrarily slowly increasing length. This goes beyond what was previously known conditionally on the Riemann Hypothesis. Our result holds in fact in much greater generality, and has several further applications, some of which I will discuss in the talk. For instance the general result implies that between a fixed number of consecutive squares there is always an integer composed of only "small" prime factors. This settles a conjecture on "smooth" or "friable" numbers and is related to the running time of Lenstra's factoring algorithm.

  • Number Theory Seminar
29 October 2015
17:30
Abstract

In contrast to the Artin-Schreier Theorem, its $p$-adic analog(s) involve infinite Galois theory, e.g., the absolute Galois group of $p$-adic fields.  We plan to give a characterization of $p$-adic $p$-Henselian valuations in an essentially finite way. This relates to the $Z/p$ metabelian form of the birational $p$-adic Grothendieck section conjecture.

  • Number Theory Seminar
29 October 2015
16:00
Olivier Taibi
Abstract

I will explain the formulation and proof of Arthur's multiplicity formula for automorphic representations of special orthogonal groups and certain inner forms of symplectic groups $G$ over a number field $F$. I work under an assumption that substantially simplifies the use of the stabilisation of the trace formula, namely that there exists a non-empty set $S$ of real places of $F$ such that $G$ has discrete series at places in $S$ and is quasi-split at places outside $S$, and restricting to automorphic representations of $G(A_{F})$ which have algebraic regular infinitesimal character at the places in $S$. In particular, this proves the general multiplicity formula for groups $G$ such that $F$ is totally real, $G$ is compact at all real places of $F$ and quasi-split at all finite places of $F$. Crucially, the formulation of Arthur's multiplicity formula is made possible by Kaletha's recent work on local and global Galois
gerbes and their application to the normalisation of Kottwitz-Langlands-Shelstad transfer factors.

  • Number Theory Seminar

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