Past Number Theory Seminar

3 March 2016
16:00
Neil Dummigan
Abstract

I will describe how the moduli of various congruences between Hecke eigenvalues of automorphic forms ought to show up in ratios of critical values of $\text{GSP}_2 \times \text{GL}_2$ L-functions. To test this experimentally requires the full force of Farmer and Ryan's technique for approximating L-values given few coefficients in the Dirichlet series.

  • Number Theory Seminar
25 February 2016
16:00
Victor Beresnevich
Abstract

I will discuss the notion of badly approximable points and recent progress and problems in this area, including Schmidt's conjecture, badly approximable points on manifolds and real numbers badly approximable by algebraic numbers.

  • Number Theory Seminar
4 February 2016
16:00
Damian Rössler
Abstract

We shall describe a new proof of the Mordell-Lang conjecture in positive characteristic, in the situation where the variety under scrutiny is a smooth subvariety of an abelian variety. 
Our proof is based on the theory of semistable sheaves in positive characteristic, in particular on  Langer's theorem that the Harder-Narasimhan filtration of sheaves becomes strongly semistable after a finite number of iterations of Frobenius pull-backs. Our proof produces a numerical upper-bound for the degree of the finite morphism from an isotrivial variety appearing in the statement of the Mordell-Lang conjecture. This upper-bound is given in terms of the Frobenius-stabilised slopes of the cotangent bundle of the variety.

  • Number Theory Seminar
28 January 2016
16:00
David Loeffler
Abstract

Iwasawa theory is a powerful technique for relating the behaviour of arithmetic objects to the special values of L-functions. Iwasawa originally developed this theory in order to study the class groups of number fields, but it has since been generalised to many other settings. In this talk, I will discuss some new results in the Iwasawa theory of the symmetric square of a modular form. This is a joint project with Sarah Zerbes, and the main tool in this work is the Euler system of Beilinson-Flach elements, constructed in our earlier works with Kings and Lei.

  • Number Theory Seminar
21 January 2016
16:00
Abstract

Given a family $F$ of elliptic curves defined over $Q$, we are interested in the set $H(Y)$ of curves $E$ in $F$, of positive rank, and for which the minimum of the canonical heights of non-torsion rational points on $E$ is bounded by some parameter $Y$. When one can show that this set is finite, it is natural to investigate statistical properties of arithmetic objects attached to elliptic curves in the set $H(Y)$. We will describe some problems related to this, and will state some results in the case of families of quadratic twists of a fixed elliptic curve.

  • Number Theory Seminar
3 December 2015
16:00
Francis Brown
Abstract

A period is a certain type of number obtained by integrating algebraic differential forms over algebraic domains. Examples include pi, algebraic numbers, values of the Riemann zeta function at integers, and other classical constants.
Difficult transcendence conjectures due to Grothendieck suggest that there should be a Galois theory of periods.
I will explain these notions in very introductory terms and show how to set up such a Galois theory in certain situations.
I will then discuss some applications, in particular to Kim's method for bounding $S$-integral solutions to the equation $u+v=1$, and possibly to high-energy physics.

  • Number Theory Seminar
26 November 2015
16:00
Abstract

The number of steps required by the Euclidean algorithm to find the greatest common divisor of a pair of integers $u,v$ with $1<u<v<n$ has been investigated since at least the 16th century, with an asymptotic for the mean number of steps being found independently by H. Heilbronn and J.D. Dixon in around 1970. It was subsequently shown by D. Hensley in 1994 that the number of steps asymptotically follows a normal distribution about this mean. Existing proofs of this fact rely on extensive effective estimates on the Gauss-Kuzman-Wirsing operator which run to many dozens of pages. I will describe how this central limit theorem can be obtained instead by a much shorter Tauberian argument. If time permits, I will discuss some related work on the number of steps for the binary Euclidean algorithm.

  • Number Theory Seminar

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