Past Partial Differential Equations Seminar

3 March 2008
16:00
Sorin Mardare
Abstract
One of the intrinsic methods in elasticity is to consider the Cauchy-Green tensor as the primary unknown, instead of the deformation realizing this tensor, as in the classical approach. Then one can ask whether it is possible to recover the deformation from its Cauchy-Green tensor. From a differential geometry viewpoint, this amounts to finding an isometric immersion of a Riemannian manifold into the Euclidian space of the same dimension, say d. It is well known that this is possible, at least locally, if and only if the Riemann curvature tensor vanishes. However, the classical results assume at least a C2 regularity for the Cauchy-Green tensor (a.k.a. the metric tensor). From an elasticity theory viewpoint, weaker regularity assumptions on the data would be suitable. We generalize this classical result under the hypothesis that the Cauchy-Green tensor is only of class W^{1,p} for some p>d. The proof is based on a general result of PDE concerning the solvability and stability of a system of first order partial differential equations with L^p coefficients.
  • Partial Differential Equations Seminar
25 February 2008
16:00
Abstract
We discuss a model of finite strain gradient plasticity including phenomenological Prager type linear kinematical hardening and nonlocal kinematical hardening due to dislocation interaction. Based on the multiplicative decomposition a thermodynamically admissible flow rule for <i>F<sub>p</sub></i> is described involving as plastic gradient Curl <i>F<sub>p</sub></i>. The formulation is covariant w.r.t. superposed rigid rotations of the reference, intermediate and spatial configuration but the model is not spin-free due to the nonlocal dislocation interaction and cannot be reduced to a dependenceon the plastic metric <i>C<sub>p</sub>=F<sub>p</sub><sup>T</sup> F<sub>p</sub></i>. <br> The linearization leads to a thermodynamically admissible model of infinitesimal plasticity involving only the Curl of the non-symmetric plastic distortion <i>p</i>. Linearized spatial and material covariance under constant infinitesimal rotations is satisfied. <br> Uniqueness of strong solutions of the infinitesimal model is obtained if two non-classical boundary conditions on the plastic distortion <i>p</i> are introduced: d<sub><i>t</i></sub><i>p</i>.&tau;=0 on the microscopically hard boundary &Gamma;<sub><i>D</i></sub>&sub;&part;&Omega; and [Curl<i>p</i>].&tau;=<i>0</i> on the microscopically free boundary &part;&Omega;\&Gamma;<sub><i>D</i></sub>, where &tau; are the tangential vectors at the boundary &part;&Omega;. Moreover, I show that a weak reformulation of the infinitesimal model allows for a global in-time solution of the corresponding rate-independent initial boundary value problem. The method of choice are a formulation as a quasivariational inequality with symmetric and coercive bilinear form, following the abstract framework proposed by Reddy. Use is made of new Hilbert-space suitable for dislocation density dependent plasticity.
  • Partial Differential Equations Seminar
11 February 2008
16:00
Marino Arroyo
Abstract
The talk will discuss the modeling of multi-phase fluid membranes surrounded by a viscous fluid with a particular emphasis on the inner flow--the motion of the lipids within the membrane surface. For this purpose, we obtain the equations of motion of a two-dimensional viscous fluid flowing on a curved surface that evolves in time. These equations are derived from the balance laws of continuum mechanics, and a geometric form of these equations is obtained. We apply these equations to the formation of a protruding bud in a fluid membrane, as a model problem for physiological processes on the cell wall. We discuss the time and length scales that set different regimes in which the outer or inner flow are the predominant dissipative mechanism, and curvature elasticity or line tension dominate as driving forces. We compare the resulting evolution equations for the shape of the vesicle when curvature energy and internal viscous drag are operative with other flows of the curvature energy considered in the literature, e.g. the $L_2$ flow of the Willmore energy. We show through a simple example (an area constrained spherical cap vesicle) that the time evolutions predicted by these two models are radically different. Joint work with Antonio DeSimone, SISSA, Italy.
  • Partial Differential Equations Seminar
21 January 2008
16:00
Valeriy Slastikov
Abstract
We study Onsager’s model of isotropic–nematic phase transition with orientation parameter on a circle and sphere. We show the axial symmetry and derive explicit formulae for all critical points. Using the information about critical points we investigate a theory of orientational order in nematic liquid crystals which interpolates between several distinct approaches based on the director field (Oseen and Frank), order parameter tensor (Landau and de Gennes), and orientation probability density function (Onsager). As in density-functional theories, the free energy is a functional of spatially-dependent orientation distribution, however, the spatial variation effects are taken into account via phenomenological elastic terms rather than by means of a direct pair-correlation function. As a particular example we consider a simplified model with orientation parameter on a circle and illustrate its relation to complex Ginzburg-Landau theory.
  • Partial Differential Equations Seminar

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