Past Special Lecture

26 May 2010
17:00
Peter Neumann
Abstract
What do historians of mathematics do? What sort of questions do they ask? What kinds of sources do they use? This series of four informal lectures will demonstrate some of the research on history of mathematics currently being done in Oxford. The subjects range from the late Renaissance mathematician Thomas Harriot (who studied at Oriel in 1577) to the varied and rapidly developing mathematics of the seventeenth century (as seen through the eyes of Savilian Professor John Wallis, and others) to the emergence of a new kind of algebra in Paris around 1830 in the work of the twenty-year old Évariste Galois. Each lecture will last about 40 minutes, leaving time for questions and discussion. No previous knowledge is required: the lectures are open to anyone from the department or elsewhere, from undergraduates upwards.
12 May 2010
17:00
Philip Beeley
Abstract
What do historians of mathematics do? What sort of questions do they ask? What kinds of sources do they use? This series of four informal lectures will demonstrate some of the research on history of mathematics currently being done in Oxford. The subjects range from the late Renaissance mathematician Thomas Harriot (who studied at Oriel in 1577) to the varied and rapidly developing mathematics of the seventeenth century (as seen through the eyes of Savilian Professor John Wallis, and others) to the emergence of a new kind of algebra in Paris around 1830 in the work of the twenty-year old Évariste Galois. Each lecture will last about 40 minutes, leaving time for questions and discussion. No previous knowledge is required: the lectures are open to anyone from the department or elsewhere, from undergraduates upwards.
5 May 2010
17:00
Jackie Stedall
Abstract
What do historians of mathematics do? What sort of questions do they ask? What kinds of sources do they use? This series of four informal lectures will demonstrate some of the research on history of mathematics currently being done in Oxford. The subjects range from the late Renaissance mathematician Thomas Harriot (who studied at Oriel in 1577) to the varied and rapidly developing mathematics of the seventeenth century (as seen through the eyes of Savilian Professor John Wallis, and others) to the emergence of a new kind of algebra in Paris around 1830 in the work of the twenty-year old Évariste Galois. Each lecture will last about 40 minutes, leaving time for questions and discussion. No previous knowledge is required: the lectures are open to anyone from the department or elsewhere, from undergraduates upwards.

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