Past Special Workshop

9 August 2017
13:30
to
17:15
Prof. Peter Grindrod CBE
Abstract

This half-day research workshop will address issues at the intersection between network science, matrix theory and mathematical physics.

Network science is producing a wide range of challenging research problems that have diverse applications across science and engineering. It is natural to cast these research challenges in terms of matrix function theory. However, in many cases, closely related problems have been tackled by researchers working in statistical physics, notably quantum mechanics on graphs and quantum chaos. This workshop will discuss recent progress that has been made in both fields and highlight opportunities for cross-fertilization. While focusing on mathematical, physical and computational issues, some results will also be presented for real data sets of relevance to practitioners in network science.

2 June 2017
14:30
to
16:00
Minhyong Kim
Abstract

Over the last few decades, a number of authors have discussed the analogy between linking numbers in three manifold topology and symbols in arithmetic. This talk will outline some results that make this precise in terms of natural complexes associated to arithmetic duality theorems. In particular, we will describe a ‘finite path integral’ formula for power residue symbols.

20 April 2015
09:00
to
21 April 2015
17:00
Various
Abstract

The Network and Criminality Workshop will explore the capacity of mathematics and computation to extract insight on network structures relevant to crime, riots, terrorism, etc. It will include presentations on current work (both application-oriented and on methods that can be applied in the future) and active discussion on how to address existing challenges.

Invited speakers (in alphabetical order) are as follows:

Prof. Alex Arenas, Professor of Computer Science & Mathematics, URV, http://deim.urv.cat/~alexandre.arenas/

Prof. Henri Berestycki, Professor of Mathematics, EHESS, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_Berestycki

Prof. Andrea Bertozzi, Professor of Mathematics, UCLA, http://www.math.ucla.edu/~bertozzi/

Dr. Paolo Campana, Research Fellow, Oxford, http://www.sociology.ox.ac.uk/academic-staff/paolo-campana.html

Toby Davies, Graduate Student,  UCL, http://www.bartlett.ucl.ac.uk/casa/people/mphil-phd-students/Toby_Davies

Dr. Hannah Fry, Lecturer in the mathematics of cities, UCL, https://iris.ucl.ac.uk/iris/browse/profile?upi=HMFRY30

Dr. Yves van Gennip, Lecturer in Mathematics, Nottingham, http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/mathematics/people/y.vangennip

Prof. Sandra González-Bailón, Assistant Professor at UPenn, http://dimenet.asc.upenn.edu/people/sgonzalezbailon/

Prof. Federico Varese, Professor of Criminology, Oxford, http://www.law.ox.ac.uk/profile/federico.vareserecep

 

If you are interested in attending this workshop, please register by following this link: https://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/node/13764/.

19 January 2015
09:00
to
20 January 2015
13:00
Alain Goriely, Antoine Jerusalem
Abstract

The 2015 Oxford Brain Mechanics Workshop 19 and 20 January, 2015 in St Hugh’s College, Oxford

Everybody is welcome to attend but (free) registration is required.

The event will include speakers from both CMU and Oxford working on Brain Mechanics and Trauma, as well as some chosen international members from the IBMTL* (www.brainmech.ox.ac.uk).

As well as focusing on various aspects of brain mechanics research, the 2015 Oxford Brain Mechanics Workshop will include the UK launch of the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) – University of Oxford ‘Brain Alliance’. We are delighted that Dr Subra Suresh, President of CMU will launch the workshop, introduced by Oxford Vice-Chancellor Prof. Andrew Hamilton.

The aim of the workshop is to foster new collaborative partnerships and facilitate the dissemination of ideas from researchers in different fields related to the study of brain mechanics, including pathology, injury and healing. The IBMTL is delighted to be a global partner in CMU’s ‘BrainHub’ initiative and further extend the truly interdisciplinary, collaborative network of IBMTL and its associated researchers in Medical Sciences, Neuroscience, Biology, Engineering, Physics and Mathematics.

  • Speakers:
  • Professor Andrew Hamilton, University of Oxford, UK
  • Dr Subra Suresh, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
  • Mr Nick de Pennington, University of Oxford, UK
  • Professor Michel Destrade, National University of Ireland, Galway
  • Dr Kristian Franze, University of Cambridge, UK
  • Professor Alain Goriely, University of Oxford, UK
  • Professor Gerhard Holzapfel, Graz University of Technology, Austria
  • Professor Jimmy Hsia, University of Illinois
  • Mr Jayaratnam Jayamohan, University of Oxford, UK
  • Professor Antoine Jerusalem, University of Oxford, UK
  • Professor Ellen Kuhl, Stanford University, USA
  • Professor Philip R LeDuc, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
  • Professor Riyi Shi, Purdue University, USA

The workshop is generously supported by the Oxford Centre for Collaborative Applied Mathematics (OCCAM), which is led by IBMTL Co-Director, Prof Alain Goriely.

2 September 2014
09:00
to
17:00
Radek Erban and Andrew Duncan
Abstract

The aim of this two-day workshop is to bring together mathematicians, biologists and researchers from other disciplines whose work involves stochastic and multiscale phenomenon, to identify common methodologies to studying such systems, both from a numerical and analytical perspective.   Relevant topics include asymptotic methods for PDEs; multiscale analysis of stochastic dynamical systems; mean-field limits of collective dynamics.  Numerical methods, mathematical theory and applications (with a specific focus on biology) will all be discussed.  The workshop will take place on the 1st and 2nd of September, at the Mathematical Institute, Oxford University.   Please visithttps://sites.google.com/site/stochmultiscale2014/ for more information and to register.

1 September 2014
09:00
to
2 September 2014
17:00
Radek Erban and Andrew Duncan
Abstract

The aim of this two-day workshop is to bring together mathematicians, biologists and researchers from other disciplines whose work involves stochastic and multiscale phenomenon, to identify common methodologies to studying such systems, both from a numerical and analytical perspective.   Relevant topics include asymptotic methods for PDEs; multiscale analysis of stochastic dynamical systems; mean-field limits of collective dynamics.  Numerical methods, mathematical theory and applications (with a specific focus on biology) will all be discussed.  The workshop will take place on the 1st and 2nd of September, at the Mathematical Institute, Oxford University.   Please visithttps://sites.google.com/site/stochmultiscale2014/ for more information and to register.

13 June 2012
00:00
to
14 June 2012
00:00
Abstract
<p><span>Organisers: Hilary Priestley, Drew Moshier and Leo Cabrer.</span><br /><br /><span>This will be dedicated principally to extensions of duality theory beyond zero-dimensional structures and to its application in novel settings. Topics that are likely to feature include duality for bilattice-based structures and associated semantics; extensions to compact Hausdorff spaces, bitopological duality, and duality for continuous data; applications to coalgebraic logic. We shall be seeking two-way interaction between those focused on a particular application and those who are seeking to extend the theory. Keynote speakers will be Mike Mislove and Drew Moshier. Samson Abramsky will be away from Oxford from</span><span class="Object">June 12</span><span>, but we are grateful for his offer to give a talk on</span><span>&nbsp;</span><span class="Object">June 11</span><span>. We are also pleased to announce that, through the good offices of Georg Gottlob (Oxford Department of Computer Science), we are able to include within W1 a tutorial lecture on the applications of bilattice semantics to computer science; this will be given by Ofer Arieli.</span></p>
9 December 2010
10:00
to
19:00
Abstract

The idea of this one day meeting is to give participants the opportunity to air the 'problem you never solved'. This might be either a problem you have never had time to work on or one that has defeated you. There will be plenty of time for discussion and maybe a few problems will be solved during the day! (Alternatively, the meeting may provide John with a source of problems to work on during his retirement.)

The programme starts with coffee at 10.00 and finishes with a reception and dinner in St Anne's College. Further details at

http://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/groups/occam/forthcoming-events/open-mathemati...

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