Past Forthcoming Seminars

16 June 2017
16:00
Lisa Lamberti + Jaroslav Fowkes
Abstract

Lisa Lamberti

Geometric models in algebra and beyond

Many phenomena in mathematics and related sciences are described by geometrical models.

In this talk, we will see how triangulations in polytopes can be used to uncover combinatorial structures in algebras. We will also glimpse at possible generalizations and open questions, as well as some applications of geometric models in other disciplines.

Jaroslav Fowkes

Jaroslav Fowkes

Optimization Challenges in the Commercial Aviation Sector

The commercial aviation sector is a low-margin business with high fixed costs, namely operating the aircraft themselves. It is therefore of great importance for an airline to maximize passenger capacity on its route network. The majority of existing full-service airlines use largely outdated capacity allocation models based on customer segmentation and fixed, pre-determined price levels. Low-cost airlines, on the other hand, mostly fly single-leg routes and have been using dynamic pricing models to control demand by setting prices in real-time. In this talk, I will review our recent research on dynamic pricing models for the Emirates route network which, unlike that of most low-cost airlines, has multiple routes traversing (and therefore competing for) the same leg.

16 June 2017
14:00
Abstract

In 1933, lattice theory was a new subject, put forth by Garrett Birkhoff. In contrast, in 1940, it was already a mature subject, worth publishing a book on. Indeed, the first monograph, written by the same G. Birkhoff, was the result of these 7 years of working on a lattice theory. In my talk, I would like to focus on this fast development. I will present the notion of a theory not only as an actors' category but as an historical category. Relying on that definition, I would like to focus on some collaborations around the notion of lattices. In particular, we will study lattice theory as a meeting point between the works of G. Birkhoff and two other mathematicians: John von Neumann and Marshall Stone.

  • History of Mathematics
16 June 2017
11:00
Abstract

Let X be a smooth, complete geometrically connected curve defined over a one variable function field K over a finite field. Let G be a subgroup of the points of the Jacobian variety J of X defined over a separable closure of K with the property that G/p is finite, where p is the characteristic of K. Buium and Voloch, under the hypothesis that X is not defined over K^p, give an explicit bound for the number of points of X which lie in G (related to a conjecture of Lang, in the case of curves). In this joint work with Pazuki, we extend their result by requiring just that X is non isotrivial.

  • Arithmetic Geometry Seminar
15 June 2017
17:30
Ozlem Beyerslan
Abstract

Groups which are "attached" to theories of fields, appearing in models of the theory  
as the automorphism groups of intermediate fields fixing an elementary submodel are called geometrically represented. 
We will discuss the concept ``geometric representation" in the case of pseudo finite fields.  Then will show that any group which is geometrically represented in a complete theory of a pseudo-finite field must be abelian. 
This result also generalizes to bounded PAC fields. This is joint work with Zoe Chatzidakis.
 

15 June 2017
16:00
Abstract

Despite its fame there appears to be little literature outlining Lurie's proof sketched in his expository article "On the classification of topological field theories." I shall embark on the quixotic quest to explain how the cobordism hypothesis is formalised and give an overview of Lurie's proof in one hour. I will not be able to go into any of the motivation, but I promise to try to make the talk as accessible as possible. 

  • Junior Geometry and Topology Seminar
15 June 2017
16:00
Jon Pridham
Abstract

Kim's iterative non-abelian reciprocity laws carve out a sequence of subsets of the adelic points of a suitable algebraic variety, containing the global points. Like Ellenberg's obstructions to the existence of global points, they are based on nilpotent approximations to the variety. Systematically exploiting this idea gives a sequence starting with the Brauer-Manin obstruction, based on the theory of obstruction towers in algebraic topology. For Shimura varieties, nilpotent approximations are inadequate as the fundamental group is nearly perfect, but relative completions produce an interesting obstruction tower. For modular curves, these maps take values in Galois cohomology of modular forms, and give obstructions to an adelic elliptic curve with global Tate module underlying a global elliptic curve.

  • Number Theory Seminar

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