Breakdown Resilience of Key Exchange Protocols

22 November 2017
15:00
Abstract

Broken cryptographic algorithms and hardness assumptions are a constant
threat to real-world protocols. Prominent examples are
hash functions for which collisions become known, or number-theoretic
assumptions which are threatened by advances in quantum computing.
Especially when it comes to key exchange protocols, the switch to
quantum-resistant primitives has begun and aims to protect today’s
secrets against future developments, moving from common Diffie–Hellman
based solutions to Learning-With-Errors-based approaches. Remarkably,
the authentication step in such protocols is usually still carried out
with quantum-vulnerable signature schemes. The intuition here is that
the adversary would need to break this protocol primitive today, without
having quantum power yet. The question we address here is if this
intuition is justified, and if so, if we can show this rigorously. We
particularly consider the authenticated variant of the recently
introduced post-quantum secure key exchange protocol NewHope (Alkim et
al., USENIX Security 2016), as well as by TLS 1.3, which is currently
being developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force.

  • Cryptography Seminar