Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar

24 May 2018
14:00
Prof. Michael Ferris
Abstract


In the past few decades, power grids across the world have become dependent on markets that aim to efficiently match supply with demand at all times via a variety of pricing and auction mechanisms. These markets are based on models that capture interactions between producers, transmission and consumers. Energy producers typically maximize profits by optimally allocating and scheduling resources over time. A dynamic equilibrium aims to determine prices and dispatches that can be transmitted over the electricity grid to satisfy evolving consumer requirements for energy at different locations and times. Computation allows large scale practical implementations of socially optimal models to be solved as part of the market operation, and regulations can be imposed that aim to ensure competitive behaviour of market participants.

Questions remain that will be outlined in this presentation.

Firstly, the recent explosion in the use of renewable supply such as wind, solar and hydro has led to increased volatility in this system. We demonstrate how risk can impose significant costs on the system that are not modeled in the context of socially optimal power system markets and highlight the use of contracts to reduce or recover these costs. We also outline how battery storage can be used as an effective hedging instrument.

Secondly, how do we guarantee continued operation in rarely occuring situations and when failures occur and how do we price this robustness?

Thirdly, how do we guarantee appropriate participant behaviour? Specifically, is it possible for participants to develop strategies that move the system to operating points that are not socially optimal?

Fourthly, how do we ensure enough transmission (and generator) capacity in the long term, and how do we recover the costs of this enhanced infrastructure?
 

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
7 June 2018
14:00
Prof. Max Gunzburger
Abstract

We first consider multilevel Monte Carlo and stochastic collocation methods for determining statistical information about an output of interest that depends on the solution of a PDE with inputs that depend on random parameters. In our context, these methods connect a hierarchy of spatial grids to the amount of sampling done for a given grid, resulting in dramatic acceleration in the convergence of approximations. We then consider multifidelity methods for the same purpose which feature a variety of models that have different fidelities. For example, we could have coarser grid discretizations, reduced-order models, simplified physics, surrogates such as interpolants, and, in principle, even experimental data. No assumptions are made about the fidelity of the models relative to the “truth” model of interest so that unlike multilevel methods, there is no a priori model hierarchy available. However, our approach can still greatly accelerate the convergence of approximations.

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
14 June 2018
14:00
Prof. Joel Tropp
Abstract

Random matrices now play a role in many areas of theoretical, applied, and computational mathematics. Therefore, it is desirable to have tools for studying random matrices that are flexible, easy to use, and powerful. Over the last fifteen years, researchers have developed a remarkable family of results, called matrix concentration inequalities, that balance these criteria. This talk offers an invitation to the field of matrix concentration inequalities and their applications.

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar