It All Adds Up: programme

All events take place in the Oxford Mathematical Institute's Andrew Wiles Building unless otherwise indicated.

Further details will be added here as they become available, so please do check back.  Titles of talks link to abstracts where these are available.

Tuesday 14th April 2015 (School students in Years 9, 10, 11)

Wednesday 15th April 2015 (School students in Years 12, 13)

Thursday 16th April 2015 (University mathematicians and mathematical scientists)

Friday 17th April 2015 (University mathematicians and mathematical scientists)

Tuesday 14th April 2015

Talks and workshops for school students in Years 9, 10 and 11.

1000-1030 Arrival, squash and biscuits

1030-1115 Vicky Neale (Oxford) 7 things you need to know about prime numbers

1130-1215 Statistics for the Millions/Hands-on Maths Activities/Workshop/Treasure Hunt

1215-1300 Lunch/Hands-on Maths Activities/Workshop/Treasure Hunt (participants to bring own lunch)

1300-1345 Hands-on Maths Activities/Workshop/Treasure Hunt/Lunch (participants to bring own lunch)

1345-1430 Statistics for the Millions/Hands-on Maths Activities/Workshop/Treasure Hunt

1445-1530 Hannah Fry (UCL) The hidden connections

1530 Close

Wednesday 15th April 2015

Talks and workshops for school students in Years 12 and 13.

1000-1030 Arrival, squash and biscuits

1030-1115 Julia Gog (Cambridge) Infectious maths!

1130-1215 Statistics for the Millions/Hands-on Maths Activities/Workshop/Treasure Hunt

1215-1300 Lunch/Hands-on Maths Activities/Workshop/Treasure Hunt (participants to bring own lunch)

1300-1345 Hands-on Maths Activities/Workshop/Treasure Hunt/Lunch (participants to bring own lunch)

1345-1430 Statistics for the Millions/Hands-on Maths Activities/Workshop/Treasure Hunt

1445-1530 Nina Snaith (Bristol) Hollywood's hippest mathematics: random matrices and Riemann zeros

1530 Close

Thursday 16th April 2015

1000-1100 Arrival, registration, and tea/coffee

1100-1105 Welcome

1105-1205 Senior Anne Bennett Prizewinner lecture: Caroline Series (Warwick) Mirzakhani's starting point

1210-1255 Plenary talk: Miranda Mowbray (HP Labs) Big Data: drinking from the firehose

1300-1430 Lunch (and posters)

1430-1530 Parallel sessions

1530-1630 Panel discussions

1630-1700 Tea/coffee (and posters)

1700-1800 Florence Nightingale lecture: Christl Donnelly (Imperial College London) An epidemiologist's life on the edge (of the science-policy interface)

1800-1930 Drinks reception

1930          Dinner (Balliol College)

Friday 17th April 2015

0900-0930 Registration for Friday-only participants

0930-1100 Parallel sessions

1100-1130 Tea/coffee (and posters)

1130-1215 Plenary talk: Nathalie Vriend (Cambridge) Research in deserts and mountains ... with mathematics on my mind!

1215-1330 Lunch (and posters)

1330-1430 Panel discussions

1430-1530 Tea/coffee, posters and poster prizes

1530-1630 Plenary talk: Kristin Lauter (Microsoft Research) How to keep your secrets in a post-quantum world

1630          Close

 

Abstracts

Christl Donnelly (MRC Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London) 

An epidemiologist's life on the edge (of the science-policy interface)

Ebola, MERS, pandemic influenza and SARS have all posed serious threats to our health and economic wellbeing in recent years.  In each of these cases, statistical (and more broadly mathematical) epidemiologists contributed to top-level policy discussions of diseases control policy development, implementation and contingency planning.  The methods build upon foundations of epidemiological modelling and analysis of both human and animal diseases (HIV/AIDS, BSE, vCJD and foot-and-mouth disease, among others).  The potential impact of such analyses is enormous, but it can be challenging to provide robust answers to key scientific and policy questions.  In the midst of an epidemic response effort, it really does feel like living on the edge.

Hannah Fry (Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, UCL) 

The hidden connections

We all like to think of ourselves as strong, independent and single-minded individuals.  But despite our illusion of free will, most of the time we find ourselves swept along by the actions of those around us.  These hidden connections affect everything from the movement of crowds to fashions and memes, and can be used to understand the mathematics of friendships and even catch the odd burglar or two.  Hannah takes you on a whistle stop tour of how the patterns in how we are connected make us surprisingly predictable - as long as you know a little bit of mathematics, that is.

Julia Gog (Cambridge) Infectious maths!

Epidemics of infectious disease remain one of the biggest threats to humankind.  Here we will look at some of the mathematics used to help us understand disease, from learning how an individual virus particle works through to designing vaccination strategies.  We will see that many problems can be tackled using school mathematics ... with a bit of creativity.

Kristin Lauter (Microsoft Research)

How to keep your secrets in a post-quantum world

This talk will give an overview of the history of various hard problems in number theory which are used as the basis for cryptosystems.  I will survey the evolution of attacks on them and improvements to the algorithms which enabled these attacks.  Then I will present some current proposals for post-quantum systems using lattice-based cryptosystems in cyclotomic number fields and give the ideas behind some recent attacks.

Miranda Mowbray (HP Labs)

Big Data: drinking from the firehose

The data scientists who use maths to find useful patterns in large data sets have been described as the new rock stars of the technology world.  One particularly promising application area for big data analysis is computer network security.  Miranda will talk about some general issues with analyzing big data to discover security problems in enterprise computer networks, and some specific techniques that have been successful.

Vicky Neale (Oxford)

7 things you need to know about prime numbers

Prime numbers are fundamentally important in mathematics.  Join Vicky to discover some of the beautiful properties of prime numbers, and learn about some of the unsolved problems that mathematicians are working on today.

Nina Snaith (Bristol)

Hollywood's hippest mathematics: random matrices and Riemann zeros

This is the story of how physicists helped answer a hundred year old question about prime numbers and how this features in a major Hollywood movie.

Caroline Series (Warwick)

Mirzakhani's starting point

In 2014, Maryam Mirzakhani of Stanford University became the first woman to be awarded the Fields medal.  The starting point of her work was a remarkable relationship called McShane's identity, about the lengths of simple closed curves on certain hyperbolic surfaces.  The proof of this identity, including the Birman-Series theorem about simple curves on surfaces, uses only quite basic ideas in hyperbolic geometry which I will try to explain.  We will then look briefly at Mirzakhani's ingenious way of exploiting the identity and where it led.

Nathalie Vriend (Cambridge)

Research in deserts and mountains ... with mathematics on my mind!

In this presentation, I will show you how applied mathematics plays an important role in the understanding of our natural environment.  My research expertise covers granular materials and I have traveled to various places on this earth to investigate the behavior of snow avalanches in mountains and sand dunes in deserts.  Our research group combines field experiments with laboratory experiments (in the GK Batchelor laboratory underneath the courtyard of the Centre for Mathematical Sciences in Cambridge) and uses mathematical tools to model these observations.  Our goal is to understand the dynamic behavior of granular flows and potentially even predict some outcomes of avalanches.

Panel discussions

Thursday

Session 1: The gender gap in first class degrees

A panel discussion with Janet Dyson (Oxford)Emma McCoy (Imperial), Elizabeth Morland (Oxford), Ellen Powell (Cambridge). Chair: Jessica Spencer (Oxford). Organised by the Mirzakhani Society.

Session 2: Careers: what can I do with a maths PhD?

A panel discussion with Heather Harrington (Oxford), Miranda Mowbray (HP Labs), Jennifer Scott (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory), Heather Tewkesbury (Smith Institute). Chair: Elizabeth Mansfield (Kent).

Session 3: Obtaining funding for research in maths

Organised by Laura Watkin (EPSRC) and Hannah Maytum (EPSRC), with assistance from the Oxford Mathematical Institute's Research Facilitation Team.  Chair: Peter Clarkson (Kent).

Session 4: To me success means ...

A panel discussion with Eugenie Hunsicker (Loughborough), Kristin Lauter (Microsoft Research), Ulrike Tillmann (Oxford), Ruth Williams (Cambridge).  Chair: Marta Mazzocco (Loughborough).

Friday

Session 1: Diversity in maths

A panel discussion with Jennifer Balakrishnan (Oxford), Peter Clarkson (Kent), Cathy Hobbs (UWE), Kristin Lauter (Microsoft Research).  Chair: Alison Etheridge (Oxford).

Session 2: Combining career and family

A panel discussion with Janet Dyson (Oxford), Rosie Robison (Anglia Ruskin), Gwyneth Stallard (Open), Nathalie Vriend (Cambridge).  Chair: Frances Kirwan (Oxford).

Session 3: Careers: what can I do with a maths degree?

A panel discussion with Rebecca Cotton-Barratt (Oxford), Ceri Fiddes (Millfield School), Nancy Nichols (Reading), Rachel Thomas (PLUS).  Chair: Ursula Martin (Oxford).

Session 4: PhDs from the perspectives of students and supervisors

A panel discussion with Rachael Bonnebaigt (Cambridge), Helen Byrne (Oxford), Renee Hoekzema (Oxford), Diane Maclagan (Warwick).  Chair: Julia Gog (Cambridge).

Parallel sessions

Thursday

Talks run 1430-1500 and 1500-1530.  Abstracts are available in the pdf file. 
PDF icon Parallel_sessions.pdf
 

Session 1

Natasha Morrison (Oxford) Saturation in the Hypercube

Anne Hillebrand (Oxford) Colour degree matrices of graphs with at most one cycle

Session 2

Victoria Allan (UCL) Making the most out of the mismatched, messy, and missing Electronic Health Records (EHR)

Alina Peluso (Brunel) Pay for Performance incentives lead to better patient health outcomes

Session 3

Rachael Bonnebaigt (Cambridge) The effect of phase change material on reducing fluctuations in building temperatures

Tania Khaleque (Oxford) Mantle convection with strongly temperature and pressure dependent viscosity

Session 4

Mathematical craft activities

Friday

Talks run 0930-1000, 1000-1030 and 1030-1100.  Sessions with one or two talks will start at 1000, sessions with three talks start at 0930.  Abstracts are available in the pdf file. 
PDF icon Parallel_sessions.pdf
 

Session 1

Anja Komatar (Leeds) An Introduction to Structural Ramsey Theory

Session 2

Magdalini Flari (Sheffield) Lie algebroids and Poisson geometry, together again

Jolanta Marzec (Bristol) A dance on the edge of number theory

Lubna Shaheen (Oxford) A geometric model of representations of Z

Session 3

Katie Gittins (Bristol) The Heat Content of a Polygon

Ma Elena Hernández-Hernández (Warwick) Probabilistic approach to solve fractional differential equations

Meena Kotecha (LSE) Addressing Mathematics and statistics anxiety in undergraduates

Session 4

Alexis Kaminski (Cambridge) Evolution of Linear Optimal Perturbations in Stratified Shear Layers

Srisivane Sivanesan (Oxford Brookes) Non-iterative three-dimensional image reconstruction algorithm for Electrical Impedance Mammography

Session 5

Katy Gaythorpe (Bath) Minimising infectious disease outbreaks after natural disasters

Chloe Spalding (Birmingham) Mathematical Modelling of the population dynamics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with a view to developing novel antimicrobials

Session 6

Mathematical craft activities

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