Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
Today
14:00
Abstract

I will discuss recent advances in sampling methods for positive semidefinite (PSD) matrix approximation. In particular, I will show how new techniques based on recursive leverage score sampling yield a surprising algorithmic result: we give a method for computing a near optimal k-rank approximation to any n x n PSD matrix in O(n * k^2) time. When k is not too large, our algorithm runs in sublinear time -- i.e. it does not need to read all entries of the matrix. This result illustrates the ability of randomized methods to exploit the structure of PSD matrices and go well beyond what is possible with traditional algorithmic techniques. I will discuss a number of current research directions and open questions, focused on applications of randomized methods to sublinear time algorithms for structured matrix problems.

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A link for this talk will be sent to our mailing list a day or two in advance.  If you are not on the list and wish to be sent a link, please contact trefethen@maths.ox.ac.uk.

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
28 October 2021
14:00
Agnieszka Międlar

Further Information: 

This talk is hosted by the Computational Mathematics Group of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory.

Abstract

Randomized NLA methods have recently gained popularity because of their easy implementation, computational efficiency, and numerical robustness. We propose a randomized version of a well-established FEAST eigenvalue algorithm that enables computing the eigenvalues of the Hermitian matrix pencil $(\textbf{A},\textbf{B})$ located in the given real interval $\mathcal{I} \subset [\lambda_{min}, \lambda_{max}]$. In this talk, we will present deterministic as well as probabilistic error analysis of the accuracy of approximate eigenpair and subspaces obtained using the randomized FEAST algorithm. First, we derive bounds for the canonical angles between the exact and the approximate eigenspaces corresponding to the eigenvalues contained in the interval $\mathcal{I}$. Then, we present bounds for the accuracy of the eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenvectors. This part of the analysis is independent of the particular distribution of an initial subspace, therefore we denote it as deterministic. In the case of the starting guess being a Gaussian random matrix, we provide more informative, probabilistic error bounds. Finally, we will illustrate numerically the effectiveness of all the proposed error bounds.

 

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A link for this talk will be sent to our mailing list a day or two in advance.  If you are not on the list and wish to be sent a link, please contact trefethen@maths.ox.ac.uk.

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
4 November 2021
14:00
Abstract

The past few years have been an exciting time for my work related to rational approximation.  This talk will present four developments:

1. AAA approximation (2016, with Nakatsukasa & Sète)
2. Root-exponential convergence and tapered exponential clustering (2020, with Nakatsukasa & Weideman)
3. Lightning (2017-2020, with Gopal & Brubeck)
4. Log-lightning (2020-21, with Nakatsukasa & Baddoo)

Two other topics will not be discussed:

X. AAA-Lawson approximation (2018, with Nakatsukasa)
Y. AAA-LS approximation (2021, with Costa)

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
20 January 2022
14:00
Abstract

We use energy estimates to derive new bounds on the eigenvalues of a generic form of double saddle-point matrices, with and without regularization terms. Results related to inertia and algebraic multiplicity of eigenvalues are also presented. The analysis includes eigenvalue bounds for preconditioned matrices based on block-diagonal Schur complement-based preconditioners, and it is shown that in this case the eigenvalues are clustered within a few intervals bounded away from zero. The analytical observations are linked to a few multiphysics problems of interest. This is joint work with Susanne Bradley.

 

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A link for this talk will be sent to our mailing list a day or two in advance.  If you are not on the list and wish to be sent a link, please contact trefethen@maths.ox.ac.uk.

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
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