Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
25 January 2018
16:00
to
17:30
Abstract

How do organisms cope with cellular variability to achieve well-defined morphologies and architectures? We are addressing this question by combining experiments with live plants and analyses of (stochastic) models that integrate cell-cell communication and tissue mechanics. During the talk, I will survey our results concerning plant architecture (phyllotaxis) and organ morphogenesis.

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
1 February 2018
16:00
to
17:30
Renaud Lambiotte
Abstract

In this talk, I will present some recent results exploring the connections between dynamical systems and network science. I will particularly focus on large-scale structures and their dynamical interpretation. Those may correspond to communities/clusters or classes of dynamically equivalent nodes. If time allows, I will also present results where the underlying network structure is unknown and where communities are directly inferred from time series observed on the nodes.

 

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
8 February 2018
16:00
to
17:30
Nicolas Vandewalle
Abstract

When soft ferromagnetic particles are suspended at air-water interfaces in the presence of a vertical magnetic field, dipole-dipole repulsion competes with capillary attraction such that 2d structures self-assemble. The complex arrangements of such floating bodies are emphasized. The equilibrium distance between particles exhibits hysteresis when the applied magnetic field is modified. Irreversible processes are evidenced. By adding a horizontal and oscillating magnetic field, periodic deformations of the assembly are induced. We show herein that collective particle motions induce locomotion at low Reynolds number. The physical mechanisms and geometrical ingredients behind this cooperative locomotion are identified. These physical mechanisms can be exploited to much smaller scales, offering the possibility to create artificial and versatile microscopic swimmers.

Moreover, we show that it is possible to generate complex structures that are able to capture particles, perform cargo transport, fluid mixing, etc.

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar

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