Mathematical and Computational Finance internal seminar

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
27 February 2020
16:00
Abstract


We adopt Deep Reinforcement Learning algorithms to design trading strategies for continuous futures contracts. Both discrete and continuous action spaces are considered and volatility scaling is incorporated to create reward functions which scale trade positions based on market volatility. We test our algorithms on the 50 most liquid futures contracts from 2011 to 2019, and investigate how performance varies across different asset classes including commodities, equity indices, fixed income and FX markets. We compare our algorithms against classical time series momentum strategies, and show that our method outperforms such baseline models, delivering positive profits despite heavy transaction costs. The experiments show that the proposed algorithms can follow large market trends without changing positions and can also scale down, or hold, through consolidation periods.
The full-length text is available at https://arxiv.org/abs/1911.10107.
 

  • Mathematical and Computational Finance internal seminar
5 March 2020
16:00
Anastasia Borovykh
Abstract

In this talk we will discuss a data-driven approach based on neural networks (NN) for calibrating financial asset price models. Determining optimal values of the model parameters is formulated as training hidden neurons within a machine learning framework, based on available financial option prices. The framework consists of two parts: a forward pass in which we train the weights of the NN off-line, valuing options under many different asset model parameter settings; and a backward pass, in which we evaluate the trained NN-solver on-line, aiming to find the weights of the neurons in the input layer. We will show how the same data-driven approach can be used to estimate the Black-Scholes implied volatility and dividend yield for American options in a fast and robust way. We then discuss the complexity of the optimization problem through an analysis of the loss surface of the neural network. We finally will present some numerical examples which show that neural networks can be an efficient and reliable technique for the calibration of financial assets and the extraction of implied information.

  • Mathematical and Computational Finance internal seminar
12 March 2020
16:00
Yufei Zhang
Abstract

In this talk, we shall propose a relaxed control regularization with general exploration rewards to design robust feedback controls for multi-dimensional continuous-time stochastic exit time problems. We establish that the regularized control problem admits a H\”{o}lder continuous feedback control, and demonstrate that both the value function and the feedback control of the regularized control problem are Lipschitz stable with respect to parameter perturbations. Moreover, we show that a pre-computed feedback relaxed control has a robust performance in a perturbed system, and derive a first-order sensitivity equation for both the value function and optimal feedback relaxed control. These stability results provide a theoretical justification for recent reinforcement learning heuristics that including an exploration reward in the optimization objective leads to more robust decision making. We finally prove first-order monotone convergence of the value functions for relaxed control problems with vanishing exploration parameters, which subsequently enables us to construct the pure exploitation strategy of the original control problem based on the feedback relaxed controls. This is joint work with Christoph Reisinger (available at https://arxiv.org/abs/2001.03148).
 

  • Mathematical and Computational Finance internal seminar
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