Stochastic Analysis Seminar

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
Tomorrow
14:15
DMITRY BELYAEV
Abstract

Smooth Gaussian functions appear naturally in many areas of mathematics. Most of the talk will be about two special cases: the random plane model and the Bargmann-Fock ensemble. Random plane wave are conjectured to be a universal model for high-energy eigenfunctions of the Laplace operator in a generic domain. The Bargmann-Fock ensemble appears in quantum mechanics and is the scaling limit of the Kostlan ensemble, which is a good model for a `typical' projective variety. It is believed that these models, despite very different origins have something in common: they have scaling limits that are described be the critical percolation model. This ties together ideas and methods from many different areas of mathematics: probability, analysis on manifolds, partial differential equation, projective geometry, number theory and mathematical physics. In the talk I will introduce all these models, explain the conjectures relating them, and will talk about recent progress in understanding these conjectures.

  • Stochastic Analysis Seminar
5 February 2018
14:15
DAVID PROEMEL
Abstract

Based on the notion of paracontrolled distributions, existence and uniqueness results are presented for rough convolution equations. In particular, this wide class of equations includes rough differential equations with possible delay, stochastic Volterra equations, and moving average equations driven by Lévy processes. The talk is based on a joint work with Mathias Trabs.

 

  • Stochastic Analysis Seminar
12 February 2018
14:15
JURGEN ANGST
Abstract

The study of the Geometry of random nodal domains has attracted a lot of attention in the recent past, in particular due to their connection with famous conjectures such as Yau's conjecture on the nodal volume of eigenfunctions of the Laplacian on compact manifolds, and Berry's conjecture on the relation between the geometry of the nodal sets associated to these eigenfunctions and the geometry of the nodal sets associated to toric random waves.

At first, the randomness involved in the definition of random nodal domains is often chosen of Gaussian nature. This allows in particular the use of explicit techniques, such as Kac--Rice formula, to derive the asymptotics of many observables of interest (nodal volume, number of connected components, Leray's measure etc.). In this talk, we will raise the question of the universality of these asymptotics, which consists in deciding if the asymptotic properties of random nodal domains do or do not depend on the particular nature of the randomness involved. Among other results, we will establish the local and global universality of the asymptotic volume associated to the set of real zeros of random trigonometric polynomials with high degree.

 

  • Stochastic Analysis Seminar
19 February 2018
14:15
MOHAMMUD FOONDUN
Abstract

In this talk, we will show how sharp bounds on the moments of the solutions to some stochastic heat equations can lead to various qualitative properties of the solutions. A major part of the method consists of approximating the solution by “independent quantities”. These quantities together with the moments bounds give us sharp almost sure properties of the solution.

  • Stochastic Analysis Seminar
26 February 2018
14:15
Abstract

We present a numerical investigation of stochastic transport for the damped and driven incompressible 2D Euler fluid flows. According to Holm (Proc Roy Soc, 2015) and Cotter et al. (2017), the principles of transformation theory and multi-time homogenisation, respectively, imply a physically meaningful, data-driven approach for decomposing the fluid transport velocity into its drift and stochastic parts, for a certain class of fluid flows. We develop a new methodology to implement this velocity decomposition and then numerically integrate the resulting stochastic partial differential equation using a finite element discretisation. We show our numerical method is consistent.
Numerically, we perform the following analyses on this velocity decomposition. We first perform uncertainty quantification tests on the Lagrangian trajectories by comparing an ensemble of realisations of Lagrangian trajectories driven by the stochastic differential equation, and the Lagrangian trajectory driven by the ordinary differential equation. We then perform uncertainty quantification tests on the resulting stochastic partial differential equation by comparing the coarse-grid realisations of solutions of the stochastic partial differential equation with the ``true solutions'' of the deterministic fluid partial differential equation, computed on a refined grid. In these experiments, we also investigate the effect of varying the ensemble size and the number of prescribed stochastic terms. Further experiments are done to show the uncertainty quantification results "converge" to the truth, as the spatial resolution of the coarse grid is refined, implying our methodology is consistent. The uncertainty quantification tests are supplemented by analysing the L2 distance between the SPDE solution ensemble and the PDE solution. Statistical tests are also done on the distribution of the solutions of the stochastic partial differential equation. The numerical results confirm the suitability of the new methodology for decomposing the fluid transport velocity into its drift and stochastic parts, in the case of damped and driven incompressible 2D Euler fluid flows. This is the first step of a larger data assimilation project which we are embarking on. This is joint work with Colin Cotter, Dan Crisan, Darryl Holm and Igor Shevchenko.

 

  • Stochastic Analysis Seminar

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