Stochastic Analysis Seminar

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
25 February 2019
15:45
Abstract

Abstract: The edge reinforced random walk is a self-interacting process, in which the random walker prefer visited edges with a bias proportional to the number of times the edges were visited. We will gently introduce this model and talk about some of its histories and recent progresses.

 

  • Stochastic Analysis Seminar
4 March 2019
14:15
ALEXANDER KALININ
Abstract

By viewing a stochastic process as a random variable taking values in a path space, the support of its law describes the set of all attainable paths. In this talk, we show that the support of the law of a solution to a path-dependent stochastic differential equation is given by the image of the Cameron-Martin space under the flow of mild solutions to path-dependent ordinary differential equations, constructed by means of the vertical derivative of the diffusion coefficient. This result is based on joint work with Rama Cont and extends the Stroock-Varadhan support theorem for diffusion processes to the path-dependent case.

  • Stochastic Analysis Seminar
4 March 2019
15:45
ARNAUD LIONNET
Abstract

Backward Stochastic Differential Equations (BSDEs) provide a systematic way to obtain Feynman-Kac formulas for linear as well as nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) of parabolic and elliptic type, and the numerical approximation of their solutions thus provide Monte-Carlo methods for PDEs. BSDEs are also used to describe the solution of path-dependent stochastic control problems, and they further arise in many areas of mathematical finance. 

In this talk, I will discuss the numerical approximation of BSDEs when the nonlinear driver is not Lipschitz, but instead has polynomial growth and satisfies a monotonicity condition. The time-discretization is a crucial step, as it determines whether the full numerical scheme is stable or not. Unlike for Lipschitz driver, while the implicit Bouchard-Touzi-Zhang scheme is stable, the explicit one is not and explodes in general. I will then present a number of remedies that allow to recover a stable scheme, while benefiting from the reduced computational cost of an explicit scheme. I will also discuss the issue of numerical stability and the qualitative correctness which is enjoyed by both the implicit scheme and the modified explicit schemes. Finally, I will discuss the approximation of the expectations involved in the full numerical scheme, and their analysis when using a quasi-Monte Carlo method.

  • Stochastic Analysis Seminar
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