Forthcoming Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
Tomorrow
15:00
Abstract

Research on robot manipulation has focused, in recent years, on grasping everyday objects, with target objects almost exclusively rigid items. Non–rigid objects, as textile ones, pose many additional challenges with respect to rigid object manipulation. In this seminar we will present how we can employ topology to study the ``state'' of a rectangular textile using the configuration space of $n$ points on the plane. Using a CW-decomposition of such space, we can define for any mesh associated with a rectangular textile a vector in an euclidean space with as many dimensions as the number of regions we have defined. This allows us to study the distribution of such points on the cloth and define meaningful states for detection and manipulation planning of textiles. We will explain how such regions can be defined and computationally how we can assign to any mesh the corresponding region. If time permits, we will also explain how the CW-structure allows us to define more than just euclidean distance between such mesh-distributions.

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

  • Applied Topology Seminar
Tomorrow
17:00
Konstantinos Roumpedakis
Abstract

In this talk, we will review the notion of non-invertible symmetries and we will study adjoint QCD in two dimensions. It turns out that this theory has a plethora of such symmetries which require deconfinement in the massless case. When a mass or certain quartic interactions are tunrned on, these symmetries are broken and the theory confines. In addition, we will use these symmetries to calculate the string tension for small mass and make some comments about naturalness along the RG flow.

  • String Theory Journal Club
7 December 2020
11:00
Dougal Davis
Abstract

Let G be a reductive group, E an elliptic curve, and Bun_G the moduli stack of principal G-bundles on E. In this talk, I will attempt to explain why Bun_G is a very interesting object from the perspectives of both singularity theory on the one hand, and shifted symplectic geometry and representation theory on the other. In the first part of the talk, I will explain how to construct slices of Bun_G through points corresponding to unstable bundles, and how these are linked to certain singular algebraic surfaces and their deformations in the case of a "subregular" bundle. In the second (probably much shorter) part, I will discuss the shifted symplectic geometry of Bun_G and its slices. If time permits, I will sketch how (conjectural) quantisations of these structures should be related to some well known algebras of an "elliptic" flavour, such as Sklyanin and Feigin-Odesskii algebras, and elliptic quantum groups.

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

  • Geometry and Analysis Seminar
7 December 2020
16:00
PATRICK CHERIDITO
Abstract

We develop a framework for showing that neural networks can overcome the curse of dimensionality in different high-dimensional approximation problems. Our approach is based on the notion of a catalog network, which is a generalization of a standard neural network in which the nonlinear activation functions can vary from layer to layer as long as they are chosen from a predefined catalog of functions. As such, catalog networks constitute a rich family of continuous functions. We show that under appropriate conditions on the catalog, catalog networks can efficiently be approximated with ReLU-type networks and provide precise estimates on the number of parameters needed for a given approximation accuracy. As special cases of the general results, we obtain different classes of functions that can be approximated with ReLU networks without the curse of dimensionality. 

 

A preprint is here: https://arxiv.org/abs/1912.04310

  • Stochastic Analysis & Mathematical Finance Seminars

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