Past Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops

5 February 2010
10:00
to
11:15
Trevor Wishart
Abstract
Trevor Wishart writes "I realise 'irrational' means something very specific to a mathematician, and I'm not using the word in that sense." Abstract: Trevor Wishart will discuss the use of Digital Signal Processing as a tool in musical composition, ranging from the application of standard analysis procedures (e.g. windowed Fourier Transforms), and common time-domain methods (Brassage), to more unconventional approaches (e.g. waveset distortion, spectral tracing, iterative-extension). He will discuss the algorithms involved and illustrate his talk with musical examples taken from his own work. This workshop is linked to a musical performance of "Two Women" and "Globalalia" by Trevor Wishart in the Jacqueline du Pre concert hall that evening (5th Feb) at 8pm as part of the Music Department's "New Music Forum". Tickets are £12 (or £8 concession) but if you are interested please let me know (Rebecca Gower, gower@maths.ox.ac.uk or 152312) as we may be able to negotiate a much lower price for members of the Mathematical Institute in a group associated with his workshop. Trevor will also be giving two lectures in the Denis Arnold Hall, Faculty of Music on the 3rd and 4th Feb which are open to the public and admission is free.
  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
29 January 2010
10:00
to
11:15
Abstract
When the human eye looks at a distant object, the lens is held in a state of tension by a set of fibres (known as zonules) that connect the lens to the ciliary body. To view a nearby object, the ciliary muscle (which is part of the ciliary body) contracts. This reduces the tension in the zonules, the lens assumes a thicker and more rounded shape and the optical power of the eye increases. This process is known as accommodation. With increased age, however, the accommodation mechanism becomes increasingly ineffective so that, from an age of about 50 years onwards, it effectively ceases to function. This condition is known as presbyopia. There is considerable interest in the ophthalmic community on developing a better understanding of the ageing processes that cause presbyopia. As well as being an interesting scientific question in its own right, it is hoped that this improved understanding will lead to improved surgical procedures (e.g. to re-start the accommodation process in elderly cataract patients).
  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
11 December 2009
11:30
to
13:00
Ellis, Reis and Zygalakis
Abstract
• “Two Problems Relating to Sand Dune Formation” by Andrew Ellis • “Interface Sharpening with a Lattice Boltzmann Equation” by Tim Reis • “A Dual Porosity Model for the Uptake of Nutrients by Root Hairs” by Kostas Zygalakis
  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
11 December 2009
10:00
to
11:15
Abstract
Atomistic computer simulation models are constructed to study a range of materials in which the atoms appear in novel environments. Two key research areas are considered: • The Growth and Structure Inorganic Nanotubes. A range of materials have been observed to form nanotubular structures (inorganic nanotubes - INTs) analogous to those well known for carbon. These INTs, which may have unique low-dimensional morphologies not simply related to known bulk polymorphs, potentially offer unique mechanical and electronic properties. A useful synthetic pathway is to use carbon nanotubes as templates using molten salts. Atomistic simulation models, in which the atom interactions are treated utilizing relatively simple potential energy functions, are developed and applied to understand the INT formation and stability. INT morphologies are classified by reference to folding two dimensional sheets. The respective roles of thermodynamics and kinetics in determining INT morphology are outlined and the atomistic results used to develop an analytic model to predict INT diameters. • Ordering on Multiple Length-Scales in Network-forming Liquids. Intermediate-range order (IRO), in which systems exhibit structural ordering on length-scales beyond the nearest-neighbour (short-range), has been identified in a wide range of materials and is characterised by the appearance of the so-called first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) at low scattering angles. The precise structural origin of such ordering remains contentious and a full understanding of the factors underlying this order is vital if such materials (many of which are technologically significant) are to be produced in a controlled manner. Simulation models, in which the ion-ion interactions are represented by relatively simple potential functions which incorporate (many-body) polarisation and which are parameterised by reference to well-directed electronic structure calculations, have been shown to reproduce such IRO and allow the precise structural origin of the IRO to be identified. Furthermore, the use of relatively simple (and hence computationally tractable) models allows for the study of the relatively long length- and time-scales required. The underlying structures are analysed with reference to both recent (neutron scattering) experimental results and high level electronic structure calculations. The role of key structural units (corner and edge sharing polyhedra) in determining the network topology is investigated in terms of the underlying dynamics and the relationship to the glass transition considered.
  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
4 December 2009
11:45
to
13:00
Stacy Williams
Abstract
HSBC Currency Trading has collaborated with the Oxford Maths Institute for over six years and is now working with its third DPhil student. In this workshop, we will look at the some of the academic research which has directly benefited the trading operation.
  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops

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