News

Wednesday, 8 May 2019

Matthew Butler awarded the Lighthill-Thwaites Prize for 2019

Oxford Mathematician Matthew Butler has been awarded the biennial Lighthill-Thwaites Prize for 2019. The prize is awarded by the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications to researchers who have spent no more than five years in full-time study or work since completing their undergraduate degrees.

Matthew's research focuses on fluid dynamics, particulary flows at low Reynolds number involving surface tension and interactions with elastic boundaries. His talk at the British Applied Mathematics Colloquium 2019 where the prize was awarded was entitled 'Sticking with droplets: Insect-inspired modelling of capillary adhesion" and focused on how having a deformable foot can be beneficial when trying to adhere to a substrate using the surface tension of a fluid droplet. In his PhD Matthew is studying insect adhesion, and in particular how insects can utilise physical laws to improve their ability to stick to surfaces.

Oxford Mathematician Doireann O'Kiely won the prize in 2017 and Laura Kimpton, also from Oxford, won it in 2013. Oxford Mathematician Jessica Williams was also a finalist this year.

 

Friday, 26 April 2019

Artur Ekert awarded a Micius Quantum Prize 2019

Oxford Mathematician Artur Ekert has been awarded a Micius Quantum Prize 2019 (Theory category) for his invention of entanglement-based quantum key distribution, entanglement swapping, and entanglement purification. The prizes recognise the scientists who have made outstanding contributions in the field of quantum mechanics and the 2019 prizes focus on the field of quantum communication. 

Artur Ekert is one of the leaders in the Quantum Cryptography field. His research extends over most aspects of information processing in quantum-mechanical systems and brings together theoretical and experimental quantum physics, computer science and information theory. Its scope ranges from deep fundamental issues in physics to prospective commercial exploitation by the computing and communications industries.

Oxford Physicist and close colleague of Artur's, David Deutsch was also awarded a prize in the Quantum Computation Theory Category.

The Micius prizes are awarded by the Micius Quantum Foundation. The Foundation is named after Micius, a Chinese philosopher who lived in the fifth century BC.

 

Saturday, 30 March 2019

Jon Chapman and Mason Porter made SIAM Fellows

Oxford Mathematician Jon Chapman and Visiting Fellow Mason Porter have been made Fellows of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM).

Jon is Professor of Mathematics and its Applications here in Oxford and a Fellow of Mansfield College. His research interests cover a vast range of the Applied Mathematics landscape including industrial mathematics, mathematical modelling, matched asymptotic expansions, partial differential equations, mathematical physiology, tumour growth and nonlinear models of biological tissue.

In the words of his citation Jon is being recognized "for his outstanding contributions to physical and biological modeling as well as for his asymptotic methods development in applied mathematics."

Mason is a former member of the Oxford Mathematics Faculty and remains a Visiting Fellow as well as holding a full-time position as a Professor of Mathematics at UCLA in the United States. Mason's work spans a wide range of interests including nonlinear science, nonlinear dynamics and chaos, nonlinear waves, quantum chaos, network science, social network analysis and mathematical biology. Mason was cited for his "contributions to diverse problems and applications in networks, complex systems, and nonlinear systems."

Thursday, 14 March 2019

Kristian Kiradjiev wins Gold Award at this year’s STEM for Britain

Oxford Mathematician Kristian Kiradjiev has won the Gold Award in the Mathematical Sciences category at this year’s STEM for Britain at the House of Commons on 13th March. This prestigious competition provides an opportunity for researchers to communicate their research to parliamentarians.  

Kristian’s poster covered his research into the mathematical modelling of flue-gas purification and the removal of toxic chemicals from the gas.

As reported last week, Kristian was one of three Oxford Mathematicians presenting in the Commons.

Friday, 8 March 2019

Apala Majumdar wins 2019 FDM Everywoman in Tech award

Oxford Mathematics Visiting Fellow and Reader in Applied Mathematics at the University of Bath, Apala Majumdar has been awarded the 2019 FDM Everywoman in Tech Academic Award. This is awarded to a woman in academia who has made an outstanding contribution to technology and science and whose work has made or has the potential to make a significant long-term impact in STEM.

Apala is an applied mathematician researching fundamental mathematical theories in material science. She specialises in Liquid Crystals and has published over 40 papers to date. Moreover, Apala works to inspire female researchers globally through mentorship and is deeply committed to teaching and training young people.

Apala was nominated by Oxford Mathematician and Director of the Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (OCIAM), Alain Goriely, who said: “I cannot think of a more deserving candidate for an academic award for young women who are inspiring other female researchers around the world. Apala has single-handedly built an international network spanning four continents, making her one of the world leaders in her field and most internationally recognised of her generation."

The FDM Tech Awards take place in the week of International Women’s Day and celebrate 50 of the most talented individuals shaking up the tech industry.

 

Wednesday, 6 March 2019

Three Oxford Mathematicians to present their research in the House of Commons

Three Oxford Mathematicians, Kristian Kiradjiev, Liam Brown and Tom Crawford are to present their research in Parliament at this year’s STEM for Britain competition at the House of Commons on 13th March. This prestigious competition provides an opportunity for researchers to communicate their research to parliamentarians.  

Kristian’s poster covers his research into the mathematical modelling of flue-gas purification, Liam's poster researches computational models of cancer immunotherapy while Tom is researching the spread of pollution in the ocean.

Judged by leading academics, the gold medalist receives £2,000, while silver and bronze receive £1,250 and £750 respectively. 

Thursday, 28 February 2019

Heather Harrington awarded the Adams Prize

Oxford Mathematics' Heather Harrington is the joint winner of the 2019 Adams Prize. The prize is one of the University of Cambridge's oldest and most prestigious prizes. Named after the mathematician John Couch Adams and endowed by members of St John's College, it commemorates Adams's role in the discovery of the planet Neptune. Previous prize-winners include James Clerk Maxwell, Roger Penrose and Stephen Hawking.

This year's Prize has been awarded for achievements in the field of The Mathematics of Networks. Heather's work uses mathematical and statistical techniques including numerical algebraic geometry, Bayesian statistics, network science and optimisation, in order to solve interdisciplinary problems. She is the Co-Director of the recently established Centre for Topological Data Analysis.

Monday, 29 October 2018

Nick Trefethen awarded honorary degrees by Fribourg and Stellenbosch Universities

Oxford Mathematician Professor Nick Trefethen, Professor of Numerical Analysis and Head of Oxford's Numerical Analysis Group has been awarded honorary degrees by the University of Fribourg in Switzerland and Stellenbosch University in South Africa where Nick was cited for his work in helping to cultivate a new generation of mathematical scientists on the African continent.

Nick's research spans a wide range within numerical analysis and applied mathematics, in particular the numerical solution of differential equations, fluid mechanics and numerical linear algebra. He is also the author of several very successful books which, as the Fribourg award acknowledges, have widened interest and nourished scientific discussion well beyond mathematics. 

Monday, 8 October 2018

Oxford Mathematicians Vicky Neale and Ursula Martin nominated for Suffrage Science awards

Congratulations to Oxford Mathematicians Vicky Neale and Ursula Martin who have been nominated for Suffrage Science awards. The awards celebrate women in science and encourage others to enter science and reach senior leadership roles. The 11 awardees are chosen by the previous award holders and the awards themselves are items of jewellery, inspired by the Suffrage movement, and are passed on as heirlooms from one female scientist to the next. 

Ursula was nominated by Professor Dame Wendy Hall, University of Southampton and Vicky was nominated by Professor Dame Celia Hoyles, University College London.

Wednesday, 26 September 2018

Helen Byrne and Francis Woodhouse win Society for Mathematical Biology awards

The Society for Mathematical Biology has announced its 2018 Awards for established biologists and among the winners are Oxford Mathematicians Helen Byrne and Francis Woodhouse.

Helen will be the recipient of the Leah Edelstein-Keshet Prize for her work focused on the development and analysis of mathematical and computational models that describe biomedical systems, with particular application to the growth and treatment of solid tumors, wound healing and tissue engineering. This award recognizes an established scientist with a demonstrated track record of exceptional scientific contributions to mathematical biology and/or has effectively developed mathematical models impacting biology. "Dr. Byrne has made outstanding scientific achievements coupled with her record of active leadership in mentoring scientific careers." The Edelstein-Keshet Prize consists of a cash prize of $500 and a certificate given to the recipient. The winner is expected to give a talk at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Mathematical Biology in Montreal in 2019.

Francis has won the H. D. Landahl Mathematical Biophysics Award. This award recognizes the scientific contributions made by a postdoctoral fellow who is making exceptional scientific contributions to mathematical biology. The award is acknowledged with a certificate, and a cash prize of USD $500.

 

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