News

Saturday, 30 March 2019

Jon Chapman and Mason Porter made SIAM Fellows

Oxford Mathematician Jon Chapman and Visiting Fellow Mason Porter have been made Fellows of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM).

Jon is Professor of Mathematics and its Applications here in Oxford and a Fellow of Mansfield College. His research interests cover a vast range of the Applied Mathematics landscape including industrial mathematics, mathematical modelling, matched asymptotic expansions, partial differential equations, mathematical physiology, tumour growth and nonlinear models of biological tissue.

In the words of his citation Jon is being recognized "for his outstanding contributions to physical and biological modeling as well as for his asymptotic methods development in applied mathematics."

Mason is a former member of the Oxford Mathematics Faculty and remains a Visiting Fellow as well as holding a full-time position as a Professor of Mathematics at UCLA in the United States. Mason's work spans a wide range of interests including nonlinear science, nonlinear dynamics and chaos, nonlinear waves, quantum chaos, network science, social network analysis and mathematical biology. Mason was cited for his "contributions to diverse problems and applications in networks, complex systems, and nonlinear systems."

Thursday, 14 March 2019

Kristian Kiradjiev wins Gold Award at this year’s STEM for Britain

Oxford Mathematician Kristian Kiradjiev has won the Gold Award in the Mathematical Sciences category at this year’s STEM for Britain at the House of Commons on 13th March. This prestigious competition provides an opportunity for researchers to communicate their research to parliamentarians.  

Kristian’s poster covered his research into the mathematical modelling of flue-gas purification and the removal of toxic chemicals from the gas.

As reported last week, Kristian was one of three Oxford Mathematicians presenting in the Commons.

Friday, 8 March 2019

Apala Majumdar wins 2019 FDM Everywoman in Tech award

Oxford Mathematics Visiting Fellow and Reader in Applied Mathematics at the University of Bath, Apala Majumdar has been awarded the 2019 FDM Everywoman in Tech Academic Award. This is awarded to a woman in academia who has made an outstanding contribution to technology and science and whose work has made or has the potential to make a significant long-term impact in STEM.

Apala is an applied mathematician researching fundamental mathematical theories in material science. She specialises in Liquid Crystals and has published over 40 papers to date. Moreover, Apala works to inspire female researchers globally through mentorship and is deeply committed to teaching and training young people.

Apala was nominated by Oxford Mathematician and Director of the Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (OCIAM), Alain Goriely, who said: “I cannot think of a more deserving candidate for an academic award for young women who are inspiring other female researchers around the world. Apala has single-handedly built an international network spanning four continents, making her one of the world leaders in her field and most internationally recognised of her generation."

The FDM Tech Awards take place in the week of International Women’s Day and celebrate 50 of the most talented individuals shaking up the tech industry.

 

Wednesday, 6 March 2019

Three Oxford Mathematicians to present their research in the House of Commons

Three Oxford Mathematicians, Kristian Kiradjiev, Liam Brown and Tom Crawford are to present their research in Parliament at this year’s STEM for Britain competition at the House of Commons on 13th March. This prestigious competition provides an opportunity for researchers to communicate their research to parliamentarians.  

Kristian’s poster covers his research into the mathematical modelling of flue-gas purification, Liam's poster researches computational models of cancer immunotherapy while Tom is researching the spread of pollution in the ocean.

Judged by leading academics, the gold medalist receives £2,000, while silver and bronze receive £1,250 and £750 respectively. 

Thursday, 28 February 2019

Heather Harrington awarded the Adams Prize

Oxford Mathematics' Heather Harrington is the joint winner of the 2019 Adams Prize. The prize is one of the University of Cambridge's oldest and most prestigious prizes. Named after the mathematician John Couch Adams and endowed by members of St John's College, it commemorates Adams's role in the discovery of the planet Neptune. Previous prize-winners include James Clerk Maxwell, Roger Penrose and Stephen Hawking.

This year's Prize has been awarded for achievements in the field of The Mathematics of Networks. Heather's work uses mathematical and statistical techniques including numerical algebraic geometry, Bayesian statistics, network science and optimisation, in order to solve interdisciplinary problems. She is the Co-Director of the recently established Centre for Topological Data Analysis.

Monday, 29 October 2018

Nick Trefethen awarded honorary degrees by Fribourg and Stellenbosch Universities

Oxford Mathematician Professor Nick Trefethen, Professor of Numerical Analysis and Head of Oxford's Numerical Analysis Group has been awarded honorary degrees by the University of Fribourg in Switzerland and Stellenbosch University in South Africa where Nick was cited for his work in helping to cultivate a new generation of mathematical scientists on the African continent.

Nick's research spans a wide range within numerical analysis and applied mathematics, in particular the numerical solution of differential equations, fluid mechanics and numerical linear algebra. He is also the author of several very successful books which, as the Fribourg award acknowledges, have widened interest and nourished scientific discussion well beyond mathematics. 

Monday, 8 October 2018

Oxford Mathematicians Vicky Neale and Ursula Martin nominated for Suffrage Science awards

Congratulations to Oxford Mathematicians Vicky Neale and Ursula Martin who have been nominated for Suffrage Science awards. The awards celebrate women in science and encourage others to enter science and reach senior leadership roles. The 11 awardees are chosen by the previous award holders and the awards themselves are items of jewellery, inspired by the Suffrage movement, and are passed on as heirlooms from one female scientist to the next. 

Ursula was nominated by Professor Dame Wendy Hall, University of Southampton and Vicky was nominated by Professor Dame Celia Hoyles, University College London.

Wednesday, 26 September 2018

Helen Byrne and Francis Woodhouse win Society for Mathematical Biology awards

The Society for Mathematical Biology has announced its 2018 Awards for established biologists and among the winners are Oxford Mathematicians Helen Byrne and Francis Woodhouse.

Helen will be the recipient of the Leah Edelstein-Keshet Prize for her work focused on the development and analysis of mathematical and computational models that describe biomedical systems, with particular application to the growth and treatment of solid tumors, wound healing and tissue engineering. This award recognizes an established scientist with a demonstrated track record of exceptional scientific contributions to mathematical biology and/or has effectively developed mathematical models impacting biology. "Dr. Byrne has made outstanding scientific achievements coupled with her record of active leadership in mentoring scientific careers." The Edelstein-Keshet Prize consists of a cash prize of $500 and a certificate given to the recipient. The winner is expected to give a talk at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Mathematical Biology in Montreal in 2019.

Francis has won the H. D. Landahl Mathematical Biophysics Award. This award recognizes the scientific contributions made by a postdoctoral fellow who is making exceptional scientific contributions to mathematical biology. The award is acknowledged with a certificate, and a cash prize of USD $500.

 

Thursday, 31 May 2018

Sir Andrew Wiles appointed as the first Regius Professor of Mathematics at Oxford

Oxford mathematician Sir Andrew Wiles, renowned for his proof of Fermat’s Last Theorem, has been appointed by Her Majesty the Queen to be Oxford’s first Regius Professor of Mathematics.

The Regius Professorship – a rare, sovereign-granted title – was granted to Oxford’s Mathematical Institute as part of the Queen’s 90th birthday celebrations. It is the first Regius Professorship awarded to Oxford since 1842.

Sir Andrew is the world’s most celebrated mathematician. In 2016 he was awarded the highest honour in mathematics, the Abel Prize, for his stunning proof of Fermat’s Last Theorem, a conundrum that had stumped mankind for 350 years. In recognition of this transformative work, he was also awarded the Copley medal, the Royal Society’s oldest and most prestigious award.

Professor Louise Richardson, Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University, said: ‘I know my colleagues join me in offering our warmest congratulations to Sir Andrew on being named Oxford’s newest Regius Professor. It is a fitting recognition of his outstanding contribution to the field of mathematics.’

Professor Martin Bridson, Head of Oxford’s Mathematical Institute, said: ‘The award of the Regius Professorship to Oxford recognised both our pre-eminence in fundamental research and the enormous benefits that flow to society from mathematics.

‘It is entirely fitting that the first holder of this Professorship should be Sir Andrew Wiles. Nobody exemplifies the relentless pursuit of mathematical understanding in the service of mankind better than him. His dedication to solving problems that have defied mankind for centuries, and the stunning beauty of his solutions to these problems, provide a beacon to inspire and sustain everyone who wrestles with the fundamental challenges of mathematics and the world around us. We are immensely proud to have Andrew as a colleague at the Mathematical Institute in Oxford.’

Sir Andrew, who will remain the Royal Society Research Professor of Mathematics at Oxford and a Fellow of Merton College, dedicated much of his early career to solving Fermat’s Last Theorem. First formulated by the French mathematician Pierre de Fermat in 1637, the theorem states:

There are no whole number solutions to the equation $x^n + y^n = z^n$ when n is greater than 2, unless xyz=0

Fermat himself claimed to have found a proof for the theorem but said that the margin of the text he was making notes on was not wide enough to contain it. Sir Andrew first became fascinated with the problem as a boy, and after years of intense private study at Princeton University, he announced he had found a proof in 1993, combining three complex mathematical fields – modular forms, elliptic curves and Galois representations.

The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, which presents the Abel Prize, said in its citation that ‘few results have as rich a mathematical history and as dramatic a proof as Fermat’s Last Theorem’. The proof has subsequently opened up new fields of inquiry and approaches to mathematics, and Sir Andrew himself continues to pursue his fascination with the subject. In his current research he is developing new ideas in the context of the Langlands Program, a set of far-reaching and influential conjectures connecting number theory to algebraic geometry and the theory of automorphic forms.

The new Regius Professorship in mathematics was one of a dozen announced by the government to celebrate the increasingly important role of academic research in driving growth and improving productivity during Queen Elizabeth II’s reign. The creation of Regius Professorships falls under the Royal Prerogative, and each appointment is approved by the monarch on ministerial advice.

Sir Andrew’s father, Maurice Wiles, was Regius Professor of Divinity at Oxford from 1970 to 1991.

You can watch Sir Andrew's Oxford Mathematics London Public Lecture and interview with Hannah Fry here.

Wednesday, 9 May 2018

Andreas Sojmark awarded the Bar-Ilan Young Researcher Prize in Financial Mathematics

Oxford Mathematician Andreas Sojmark, a DPhil student in the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Partial Differential Equations has been awarded the Bar-Ilan Young Researcher Prize in Financial Mathematics. The prize is awarded to a PhD student or early career postdoctoral researcher for an outstanding paper in financial mathematics submitted for the Third Bar-Ilan Conference in Financial Mathematics.

Andreas' paper `An SPDE model for systemic risk with endogenous contagion' will be presented at the conference at the end of May.

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