Past Applied Algebra and Topology

11 June 2018
14:00
Renaud Lamboitte
Abstract

In the last years complex networks tools contributed to provide insights on the structure of research, through the study of collaboration, citation and co-occurrence networks. The network approach focuses on pairwise relationships, often compressing multidimensional data structures and inevitably losing information. In this paper we propose for the first time a simplicial complex approach to word co-occurrences, providing a natural framework for the study of higher-order relations in the space of scientific knowledge. Using topological methods we explore the conceptual landscape of mathematical research, focusing on homological holes, regions with low connectivity in the simplicial structure. We find that homological holes are ubiquitous, which suggests that they capture some essential feature of research practice in mathematics. Holes die when a subset of their concepts appear in the same article, hence their death may be a sign of the creation of new knowledge, as we show with some examples. We find a positive relation between the dimension of a hole and the time it takes to be closed: larger holes may represent potential for important advances in the field because they separate conceptually distant areas. We also show that authors' conceptual entropy is positively related with their contribution to homological holes, suggesting that polymaths tend to be on the frontier of research.

  • Applied Algebra and Topology
1 June 2018
12:00
Maddie Weinstein
Abstract

We will discuss the algebraicity of two quantities central to the computation of persistent homology. We will also connect persistent homology and algebraic optimization. Namely, we will express the degree corresponding to the distance variable of the offset hypersurface in terms of the Euclidean distance degree of the starting variety, obtaining a new way to compute these degrees. Finally, we will describe the non-properness locus of the offset construction and use this to describe the set of points that are topologically interesting (the medial axis and center points of the bounded components of the complement of the variety) and relevant to the computation of persistent homology.

  • Applied Algebra and Topology
25 May 2018
12:00
Florian Pausinger
Abstract

Persistent homology is an algebraic tool for quantifying topological features of shapes and functions, which has recently found wide applications in data and shape analysis. In the first and introductory part of this talk I recall the underlying ideas and basic concepts of this very active field of research. In the second part, I plan to sketch a concrete application of this concept to digital image processing. 

  • Applied Algebra and Topology
18 May 2018
12:00
Abstract

This talk focuses on algebraic and combinatorial-topological problems motivated by neuroscience. Neural codes allow the brain to represent, process, and store information about the world. Combinatorial codes, comprised of binary patterns of neural activity, encode information via the collective behavior of populations of neurons. A code is called convex if its codewords correspond to regions defined by an arrangement of convex open sets in Euclidean space. Convex codes have been observed experimentally in many brain areas, including sensory cortices and the hippocampus,where neurons exhibit convex receptive fields. What makes a neural code convex? That is, how can we tell from the intrinsic structure of a code if there exists a corresponding arrangement of convex open sets?

This talk describes how to use tools from combinatorics and commutative algebra to uncover a variety of signatures of convex and non-convex codes.

This talk is based on joint works with Aaron Chen and Florian Frick, and with Carina Curto, Elizabeth Gross, Jack Jeffries, Katie Morrison, Mohamed Omar, Zvi Rosen, and Nora Youngs.

  • Applied Algebra and Topology
11 May 2018
12:00
Steve Oudot
Abstract

How can we adapt the Topological Data Analysis (TDA) pipeline to use several filter functions at the same time? Two orthogonal approaches can be considered: (1) running the standard 1-parameter pipeline and doing statistics on the resulting barcodes; (2) running a multi-parameter version of the pipeline, still to be defined. In this talk I will present two recent contributions, one for each approach. The first contribution considers intrinsic compact metric spaces and shows that the so-called Persistent Homology Transform (PHT) is injective over a dense subset of those. When specialized to metric graphs, our analysis yields a stronger result, namely that the PHT is injective over a subset of full measurem which allows for sufficient statistics. The second contribution investigates the bi-parameter version of the TDA pipeline and shows a decomposition result "à la Crawley-Boevey" for a subcategory of the 2-parameter persistence modules called "exact modules". This result has an impact on the study of interlevel-sets persistence and on that of sheaves of vector spaces on the real line. 

This is joint work with Elchanan Solomon on the one hand, with Jérémy Cochoy on the other hand.

  • Applied Algebra and Topology
4 May 2018
12:00
Michael Adamer
Abstract

Steady state chemical reaction models can be thought of as algebraic varieties whose properties are determined by the network structure. In experimental set-ups we often encounter the problem of noisy data points for which we want to find the corresponding steady state predicted by the model. Depending on the network there may be many such points and the number of which is given by the euclidean distance degree (ED degree). In this talk I show how certain properties of networks relate to the ED degree and how the runtime of numerical algebraic geometry computations scales with the ED degree.

  • Applied Algebra and Topology
27 April 2018
12:00
Oliver Vipond
Abstract

Single parameter persistent homology has proven to be a useful data analytic tool and single parameter persistence modules enjoy a concise description as a barcode, a complete invariant. [Bubenik, 2012] derived a topological summary closely related to the barcode called the persistence landscape which is amenable to statistical analysis and machine learning techniques.

The theory of multidimensional persistence modules is presented in [Carlsson and Zomorodian, 2009] and unlike the single parameter case where one may associate a barcode to a module, there is not an analogous complete discrete invariant in the multiparameter setting. We propose an incomplete invariant derived from the rank invariant associated to a multiparameter persistence module, which generalises the single parameter persistence landscape in [Bubenik, 2012] and satisfies similar stability properties with respect to the interleaving distance. Our invariant naturally lies in a Banach Space and so is naturally endowed with a distance function, it is also well suited to statistical analysis since there is a uniquely defined mean associated to multiple landscapes. We shall present computational examples in the 2-parameter case using the RIVET software presented in [Lesnick and Wright, 2015].

  • Applied Algebra and Topology
9 March 2018
12:00
Greg Henselman
Abstract

Topological data analysis (TDA) is a robust field of mathematical data science specializing in complex, noisy, and high-dimensional data.  While the elements of modern TDA have existed since the mid-1980’s, applications over the past decade have seen a dramatic increase in systems analysis, engineering, medicine, and the sciences.  Two of the primary challenges in this field regard modeling and computation: what do topological features mean, and are they computable?  While these questions remain open for some of the simplest structures considered in TDA — homological persistence modules and their indecomposable submodules — in the past two decades researchers have made great progress in algorithms, modeling, and mathematical foundations through diverse connections with other fields of mathematics.  This talk will give a first perspective on the idea of matroid theory as a framework for unifying and relating some of these seemingly disparate connections (e.g. with quiver theory, classification, and algebraic stability), and some questions that the fields of matroid theory and TDA may mutually pose to one another.  No expertise in homological persistence or general matroid theory will be assumed, though prior exposure to the definition of a matroid and/or persistence module may be helpful.

  • Applied Algebra and Topology
2 March 2018
12:00
Sara Kalisnik
Abstract

The aim of applied topology is to use and develop topological methods for applied mathematics, science and engineering. One of the main tools is persistent homology, an adaptation of classical homology, which assigns a barcode, i.e., a collection of intervals, to a finite metric space. Because of the nature of the invariant, barcodes are not well adapted for use by practitioners in machine learning tasks. We can circumvent this problem by assigning numerical quantities to barcodes, and these outputs can then be used as input to standard algorithms. I will explain how we can use tropical-like functions to coordinatize the space of persistence barcodes. These coordinates are stable with respect to the bottleneck and Wasserstein distances. I will also show how they can be used in practice.

  • Applied Algebra and Topology