Past Special Lecture

4 March 2014
16:00
Professor James D Murray
Abstract
<p>&nbsp;“Understanding the generation and control of pattern and form is still a challenging and major problem in the biomedical sciences. I shall describe three very different problems. First I shall briefly describe the development and application of the mechanical theory of morphogenesis and the discovery of morphogenetic laws in limb development and how it was used to move evolution backwards. I shall then describe a surprisingly informative model, now used clinically, for quantifying the growth of brain tumours, enhancing imaging techniques and quantifying individual patient treatment protocols prior to their use.&nbsp; Among other things, it is used to estimate patient life expectancy and explain why some patients live longer than others with the same treatment protocols. Finally I shall describe an example from the social sciences which quantifies marital interaction that is used to predict marital stability and divorce.&nbsp; From a large study of newly married couples it had a 94% accuracy. I shall show how it has helped design a new scientific marital therapy which is currently used in clinical practice.”</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
31 May 2013
14:00
Eric Weinstein
Abstract

A program for Geometric Unity is presented to argue that the seemingly baroque features of the standard model of particle physics are in fact inexorable and geometrically natural when generalizations of the Yang-Mills and Dirac theories are unified with one of general relativity.

23 May 2013
16:00
Eric Weinstein
Abstract

A program for Geometric Unity is presented to argue that the seemingly baroque features of the standard model of particle physics are in fact inexorable and geometrically natural when generalizations of the Yang-Mills and Dirac theories are unified with one of general relativity.

20 June 2011
15:45
Professor Sir Vaughan Jones
Abstract

Abstract: In the 1990's Haagerup discovered a new subfactor, and hence a new topological quantum field theory, that has so far proved inaccessible by the methods of quantum groups and conformal field theory. It was the subfactor of smallest index beyond 4. This led to a classification project-classify all subfactors to as large an index as possible. So far we have gone as far as index 5. It is known that at index 6 wildness phenomena occur which preclude a simple listing of all subfactors of that index. It is possible that wildness occurs at a smaller index value, the main candidate being approximately 5.236.

 

 

23 November 2010
10:00
Zhiwei Yun
Abstract
<!-- p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 24.0px 'Times New Roman'} --> <p class="p1">Introduce the parabolic Hitchin fibration, construct the affine Weyl group action on its fiberwise cohomology, and study one example.</p>

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