Past Forthcoming Seminars

Today
12:00
Abstract

A great deal of effort has gone into trying to model social influence --- including the spread of behavior, norms, and ideas --- on networks. Most models of social influence tend to assume that individuals react to changes in the states of their neighbors without any time delay, but this is often not true in social contexts, where (for various reasons) different agents can have different response times. To examine such situations, we introduce the idea of a timer into threshold models of social influence. The presence of timers on nodes delays the adoption --- i.e., change of state --- of each agent, which in turn delays the adoptions of its neighbors. With a homogeneous-distributed timer, in which all nodes exhibit the same amount of delay, adoption delays are also homogeneous, so the adoption order of nodes remains the same. However, heterogeneously-distributed timers can change the adoption order of nodes and hence the "adoption paths" through which state changes spread in a network. Using a threshold model of social contagions, we illustrate that heterogeneous timers can either accelerate or decelerate the spread of adoptions compared to an analogous situation with homogeneous timers, and we investigate the relationship of such acceleration or deceleration with respect to timer distribution and network structure. We derive an analytical approximation for the temporal evolution of the fraction of adopters by modifying a pair approximation of the Watts threshold model, and we find good agreement with numerical computations. We also examine our new timer model on networks constructed from empirical data.

Link to arxiv paper: https://arxiv.org/abs/1706.04252

Today
12:00
Alexander Strohmaier
Abstract

I will review some classical results on geometric scattering
theory for linear hyperbolic evolution equations
on globally hyperbolic spacetimes and its relation to particle and charge
creation in QFT. I will then show that some index formulae for the
scattering matrix can be interpreted as a special case of the  Lorentzian
analog of the Atyiah-Patodi-Singer index theorem. I will also discuss a
local version of this theorem and its relation to anomalies in QFT.
(Joint work with C. Baer)

  • Quantum Field Theory Seminar
20 November 2017
17:00
Professor Kate Smith-Miles
Abstract

Many industrial optimisation problems involve the challenging task of efficiently searching for optimal decisions from a huge set of possible combinations. The optimal solution is the one that best optimises a set of objectives or goals, such as maximising productivity while minimising costs. If we have a nice mathematical equation for how each objective depends on the decisions we make, then we can usually employ standard mathematical approaches, such as calculus, to find the optimal solution. But what do we do when we have no idea how our decisions affect the objectives, and thus no equations? What if all we have is a small set of experiments, where we have tried to measure the effect of some decisions? How do we make use of this limited information to try to find the best decisions?

This talk will present a common industrial optimisation problem, known as expensive black box optimisation, through a case study from the manufacturing sector. For problems like this, calculus can’t help, and trial and error is not an option! We will introduce some methods and tools for tackling expensive black-box optimisation. Finally, we will discuss new methodologies for assessing the strengths and weaknesses of optimisation methods, to ensure the right method is selected for the right problem.

20 November 2017
15:45
ANDREY KORMILITZIN
Abstract

Recurrent major mood episodes and subsyndromal mood instability cause substantial disability in patients with bipolar disorder. Early identification of mood episodes enabling timely mood stabilisation is an important clinical goal. The signature method is derived from stochastic analysis (rough paths theory) and has the ability to capture important properties of complex ordered time series data. To explore whether the onset of episodes of mania and depression can be identified using self-reported mood data.

  • Stochastic Analysis Seminar
20 November 2017
15:45
Mark Powell
Abstract

I will talk about the diffeomorphism classification of 4-manifolds up to 
connected sums with the complex projective plane, and how the resulting 
equivalence class of a manifold can be detected by algebraic topological 
invariants of the manifold.  I may also discuss related results when one 
takes connected sums with another favourite 4-manifold, S^2 x S^2, instead.

20 November 2017
14:45
Abstract

In this joint work with Amandine Aftalion we study the minimisers of an energy functional in two-dimensions describing a rotating two-component condensate. This involves in particular separating a line-energy term and a vortex term which have different orders of magnitude, and requires new estimates for functionals of the Cahn-Hilliard (or Modica-Mortola) type.

  • Partial Differential Equations Seminar
20 November 2017
14:15
VLAD MARGARINT
Abstract

In this talk, I am going to report on some on-going research at the interface between Rough Paths Theory and Schramm-Loewner evolutions (SLE). In this project, we try to adapt techniques from Rough Differential Equations to the study of the Loewner Differential Equation. The main ideas concern the restart of the backward Loewner differential equation from the singularity in the upper half plane. I am going to describe some general tools that we developed in the last months that lead to a better understanding of the dynamics in the closed upper half plane under the backward Loewner flow.
Joint work with Prof. Dmitry Belyaev and Prof. Terry Lyons

  • Stochastic Analysis Seminar
20 November 2017
14:15
Ben Davison
Abstract

Associated to a finite graph without loops is the Kac-Moody Lie algebra for the Cartan matrix whose off diagonal entries are (minus) the adjacency matrix for the graph.  Two famous conjectures of Kac, proved by Hausel, Letellier and Villegas, hint that there may be some larger cohomologically graded algebra associated to the graph (even if there are loops), providing "higher" Kac moody Lie algebras, or at least their positive halves.  Using work with Sven Meinhardt, I will give a geometric construction of the (full) Kac-Moody algebra for a general finite graph, using cohomological DT theory.  Along the way we'll see a proof of the positivity conjecture for the modified Kac polynomials of Bozec, Schiffmann and Vasserot counting various types of representations of quivers.

 

  • Geometry and Analysis Seminar

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