Past Forthcoming Seminars

24 September 2018
17:30
Roger Penrose
Abstract

Oxford Mathematics and the Clay Mathematics Institute Public Lectures

Roger Penrose - Eschermatics
24 September 2018 - 5.30pm

Roger Penrose’s work has ranged across many aspects of mathematics and its applications from his influential work on gravitational collapse to his work on quantum gravity. However, Roger has long had an interest in and influence on the visual arts and their connections to mathematics, most notably in his collaboration with Dutch graphic artist M.C. Escher. In this lecture he will use Escher’s work to illustrate and explain important mathematical ideas.

Oxford Mathematics is hosting this special event in its Public Lecture series during the conference to celebrate the 20th Anniversary of the foundation of the Clay Mathematics Institute. After the lecture Roger will be presented with the Clay Award for the Dissemination of Mathematical Knowledge.

5.30-6.30pm, Mathematical Institute, Oxford

Please email external-relations@maths.ox.ac.uk to register.

Watch live:

https://www.facebook.com/OxfordMathematics
https://livestream.com/oxuni/Penrose

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

14 September 2018
10:00
Marco Di Francesco
Abstract

The derivation of first-order nonlinear transport PDEs via interacting particles subject only to deterministic forces is crucial in the socio-biological sciences and in the real world applications (e.g. vehicular traffic, pedestrian movements), as it provides a rigorous justification to a "continuum" description in situations more naturally described by a discrete approach. This talk will collect recent results on the derivation of entropy solutions to scalar conservation laws (arising e.g. in traffic flow) as many particle limits of "follow-the-leader"-type ODEs, including extensions to the case with Dirichlet boundary conditions and to the Hughes model for pedestrian movements (the results involve S. Fagioli, M. D. Rosini, G. Russo). I will then describe a recent extension of this approach to nonlocal transport equations with a "nonlinear mobility" modelling prevention of overcrowding for high densities (in collaboration with S. Fagioli and E. Radici). 

  • OxPDE Special Seminar
5 September 2018
17:00
Persi Diaconis
Abstract

In this lecture Persi Diaconis will take a look at some of our most primitive images of chance - flipping a coin, rolling a roulette wheel and shuffling cards - and via a little bit of mathematics (and a smidgen of physics) show that sometimes things are not very random at all. Indeed chance is sometimes confused with frequency and this confusion caries over to a confusion between chance and evidence. All of which explains our wild misuse of probability and statistical models.

Persi Diaconis is world-renowned for his study of mathematical problems involving randomness and randomisation. He is the co-author of 'Ten Great Ideas about Chance (2017) and is the Mary V. Sunseri Professor of Statistics and Mathematics at Stanford University. 

Please email external-relations@maths.ox.ac.uk to register.

Watch live:

https://www.facebook.com/OxfordMathematics
https://livestream.com/oxuni/PersiDiaconis

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

10 August 2018
11:00
Abstract

We consider the behaviors of global solutions to the initial value problems for the multi-dimensional Navier-Stokes(Euler)-Fokker-Planck equations. It is shown that due to the micro-macro coupling effects of relaxation damping type, the sound wave type propagation of this NSFP or EFP system for two-phase fluids is observed with the wave speed determined by the two-phase fluids. This phenomena can not be observed for the pure Fokker-Planck equation and the Navier-Stokes(Euler) equation with frictional damping.

  • OxPDE Special Seminar
6 August 2018
16:15
Joshua Jackson
Abstract

Geometric Invariant Theory is a central tool in the construction of moduli spaces, and shares the property ubiquitous among such tools that certain so-called 'unstable' objects must be excluded if the moduli space is to be well behaved. However, instability in GIT is a structured phenomenon: after making a choice of a certain invariant inner product, one has the HKKN stratification of the parameter space which, morally, sorts the objects according to how unstable they are. I will explain how one can use recent results of Berczi-Doran-Hawes-Kirwan in Non-Reductive GIT to perform quotients of these unstable strata as well, extending the classifications given by classical moduli spaces. This can be carried out, at least in principle, for any moduli problem that can be posed using GIT, and I will discuss two examples in particular: unstable (i.e. singular) curves, and coherent sheaves of fixed Harder-Narasimhan type. The latter of these is joint work with Gergely Berczi, Victoria Hoskins and Frances Kirwan.
 

  • Algebraic Geometry Seminar
6 August 2018
14:45
Abstract

I will explain how the definition of Bridgeland stability condition on a triangulated category C can be generalised to allow for massless objects. This allows one to construct a partial compactification of the stability space Stab(C) in which each `boundary stratum' is related to Stab(C/N) for a thick subcategory N of C, and has a neighbourhood which fibres over (an open subset of) Stab(N). This is joint work with Nathan Broomhead, David Pauksztello, and David Ploog.
 

  • Algebraic Geometry Seminar
6 August 2018
13:30
Young-Hoon Kiem
Abstract

Enumerative  invariants since 1995 are defined as integrals of cohomology classes over a particular homology class, called the virtual fundamental class. When there is a torus action, the virtual fundamental class is localized to the fixed points and this turned out to be the most effective technique for computation of the virtual integrals so far. About 10 years ago, Jun Li and I discovered that when there is a cosection of the obstruction sheaf, the virtual fundamental class is localized to the zero locus of the cosection. This also turned out to be quite useful for computation of Gromov-Witten invariants and more. In this talk, I will discuss a generalization of the cosection localization to real classes which provides us with a purely topological theory of Fan-Jarvis-Ruan-Witten invariants (quantum singularity theory) as well as some GLSM invariants. Based on a joint work with Jun Li at arXiv:1806.00116.
 

  • Algebraic Geometry Seminar
2 August 2018
12:00
Abstract

We solve the construction of the turbulent two point functions in the following manner:

A mathematical theory, based on a few physical laws and principles, determines the construction of the turbulent two point function as the expectation value of a statistically defined random field. The random field is realized via an infinite induction, each step of which is given in closed form.

Some version of such models have been known to physicists for some 25 years. Our improvements are two fold:

  1. Some details in the reasoning appear to be missing and are added here.
  2. The mathematical nature of the algorithm, difficult to discern within the physics presentation, is more clearly isolated.

Because the construction is complex, usable approximations, known as surrogate models, have also been developed.

The importance of these results lies in the use of the two point function to improve on the subgrid models of Lecture I.

We also explain limitations. For the latter, we look at the deflagration to detonation transition within a type Ia supernova and decide that a completely different methodology is recommended. We propose to embed multifractal ideas within a physics simulation package, rather than attempting to embed the complex formalism of turbulent deflagration into the single fluid incompressible model of the two point function. Thus the physics based simulation model becomes its own surrogate turbulence model.

  • OxPDE Special Seminar
2 August 2018
11:00
Abstract

We discuss three methods for the simulation of turbulent fluids. The issue we address is not the important issue of numerical algorithms, but the even more basic question of the equations to be solved, otherwise known as the turbulence model.  These equations are not simply the Navier-Stokes equations, but have extra, turbulence related terms, related to turbulent viscosity, turbulent diffusion and turbulent thermal conductivity. The extra terms are not “standard textbook” physics, but are hypothesized based on physical reasoning. Here we are concerned with these extra terms.

The many models, divided into broad classes, differ greatly in

Dependence on data
Complexity
Purpose and usage

For this reason, each of the classes of models has its own rationale and domain of usage.

We survey the landscape of turbulence models.

Given a turbulence model, we ask: what is the nature of convergence that a numerical algorithm should strive for? The answer to this question lies in an existence theory for the Euler equation based on the Kolmogorov 1941 turbulent scaling law, taken as a hypothesis (joint work with G-Q Chen).

  • OxPDE Special Seminar

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