Past Forthcoming Seminars

4 October 2001
14:00
Abstract
The Kestrel interface for submitting optimization problems to the NEOS Server augments the established e-mail, socket, and web interfaces by enabling easy usage of remote solvers from a local modeling environment. \\ \\ Problem generation, including the run-time detection of syntax errors, occurs on the local machine using any available modeling language facilities. Finding a solution to the problem takes place on a remote machine, with the result returned in the native modeling language format for further processing. A byproduct of the Kestrel interface is the ability to solve multiple problems generated by a modeling language in parallel. \\ \\ This mechanism is used, for example, in the GAMS/AMPL solver available through the NEOS Server, which internally translates a submitted GAMS problem into AMPL. The resulting AMPL problem is then solved through the NEOS Server via the Kestrel interface. An advantage of this design is that the GAMS to AMPL translator does not need to be collocated with the AMPL solver used, removing restrictions on solver choice and reducing administrative costs. \\ \\ This talk is joint work with Elizabeth Dolan.
  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
21 June 2001
14:00
Prof Gilbert Strang
Abstract
Tridiagonal matrices and three term recurrences and second order equations appear amazingly often, throughout all of mathematics. We won't try to review this subject. Instead we look in two less familiar directions. \\ \\ Here is a tridiagonal matrix problem that waited surprisingly long for a solution. Forward elimination factors T into LDU, with the pivots in D as usual. Backward elimination, from row n to row 1, factors T into U_D_L_. Parlett asked for a proof that diag(D + D_) = diag(T) + diag(T^-1).^-1. In an excellent paper (Lin Alg Appl 1997) Dhillon and Parlett extended this four-diagonal identity to block tridiagonal matrices, and also applied it to their "Holy Grail" algorithm for the eigenproblem. I would like to make a different connection, to the Kalman filter. \\ \\ The second topic is a generalization of tridiagonal to "tree-diagonal". Unlike the interval, the tree can branch. In the matrix T, each vertex is connected only to its neighbors (but a branch point has more than two neighbors). The continuous analogue is a second order differential equation on a tree. The "non-jump" conditions at a meeting of N edges are continuity of the potential (N-1 equations) and Kirchhoff's Current Law (1 equation). Several important properties of tridiagonal matrices, including O(N) algorithms, survive on trees.
  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
Prof Mike J D Powell
Abstract
Let the thin plate spline radial basis function method be applied to interpolate values of a smooth function $f(x)$, $x \!\in\! {\cal R}^d$. It is known that, if the data are the values $f(jh)$, $j \in {\cal Z}^d$, where $h$ is the spacing between data points and ${\cal Z}^d$ is the set of points in $d$ dimensions with integer coordinates, then the accuracy of the interpolant is of magnitude $h^{d+2}$. This beautiful result, due to Buhmann, will be explained briefly. We will also survey some recent findings of Bejancu on Lagrange functions in two dimensions when interpolating at the integer points of the half-plane ${\cal Z}^2 \cap \{ x : x_2 \!\geq\! 0 \}$. Most of our attention, however, will be given to the current research of the author on interpolation in one dimension at the points $h {\cal Z} \cap [0,1]$, the purpose of the work being to establish theoretically the apparent deterioration in accuracy at the ends of the range from ${\cal O} ( h^3 )$ to ${\cal O} ( h^{3/2} )$ that has been observed in practice. The analysis includes a study of the Lagrange functions of the semi-infinite grid ${\cal Z} \cap \{ x : x \!\geq\! 0 \}$ in one dimension.
  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
Dr Lawrence Daniels and Dr Iain Strachan
Abstract
In this talk we review experiences of using the Harwell Subroutine Library and other numerical software codes in implementing large scale solvers for commercial industrial process simulation packages. Such packages are required to solve problems in an efficient and robust manner. A core requirement is the solution of sparse systems of linear equations; various HSL routines have been used and are compared. Additionally, the requirement for fast small dense matrix solvers is examined.
  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar

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