News

Monday, 8 May 2017

Mathematical Institute receives Athena Swan Silver Award

The Athena SWAN charter was establised in 2005 to encourage and recognise commitment to advancing the careers of women in science. In 2013 the Mathematical Institute here in Oxford was awarded a bronze medal and now, four years later, we are pleased to announce that we have been upgraded to silver.

Martin Bridson, Head of Department, said of the award: "Our Athena SWAN work supports the Department’s overarching aim of creating a working environment in which students and staff alike can achieve their full potential. This is a constant feature of all that we do, of course, but the process of self-reflection required in preparing our submission for this award provided a focus and stimulus to action that will benefit us all.

It is vital that the country’s leading departments be seen as beacons of commitment to supporting the work/life balance of their members and to redressing the under-representation of women in mathematics. This high-profile award does much to further our efforts in this direction."

Our application can be viewed here.

Thursday, 27 April 2017
Wednesday, 12 April 2017

Oxford Mathematics students win prizes at BAMC

The British Applied Mathematics Colloquium (BAMC), held this year at the University of Surrey, has awarded its two talk prizes to Oxford Mathematicians Jessica Williams and Graham Benham. Their colleague in Oxford Mathematics Ian Roper won the poster prize. All three are part of the Industrially Focused Mathematical Modelling Centre for Doctoral Training (InFoMM) a partnership between EPSRC, the University of Oxford, and a large number of industry partners.

Wednesday, 12 April 2017

Doireann O'Kiely wins the Lighthill-Thwaites Prize

Oxford Mathematician Doireann O'Kiely has been awarded the biennial Lighthill-Thwaites Prize for her work on the production of thin glass sheets. The prize is awarded by the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications to researchers who have spent no more than five years in full-time study or work since completing their undergraduate degrees. Oxford Mathematicians Nabil Fadai and Zachary Wilmott were also among the five finalists. The prize was presented at the British Applied Mathematics Colloquium on Tuesday 11 April.

Doireann's work focuses on mathematical modelling of real-world systems, primarily in fluid mechanics.  She conducted her study of the production of thin glass sheets via the redraw process in collaboration with Schott AG.

Monday, 13 March 2017

James Grogan wins Gold at STEM

Oxford Mathematician James Grogan has won Gold for Mathematics at STEM for Britain, a poster competition and exhibition for early career researchers held at the Houses of Parliament on 13 March 2017. James's poster and work is focused on understanding tumour development and treatment.

Around 150 researchers presented at STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) for Britain this year, including 5 Oxford Mathematicians – James (of course), Lucy Hutchinson, Christoph Siebenbrunner, Edward Rolls and Ben Sloman. 

Thursday, 9 March 2017

Oxford Mathematician and Computer Scientist Andreea Marzoca wins top spot in national student awards

Oxford Mathematics and Computer Science Undergraduate Andreea Marzoca has become joint winner of the The WCIT University IT Awards 2017. The awards recognise outstanding undergraduate and postgraduate IT students within the UK, and were created in 2015 by The Worshipful Company of Information Technologists Charity (WCIT Charity). Criteria for the award included academic excellence, overcoming adversity, entrepreneurial skills and contribution to charity or community. Andreea, and joint winner Joanna Joss (of Brunel University, London) are the first female winners of this award. 

Andreea is a 3rd year undergraduate studying Maths and Computer Science. She is also Vice President of OxWoCS (Oxford Women in Computer Science). Andreea received her award along with the other finalists at the WCIT 95th Business Lunch, held at the Saddlers’ Hall in the City of London, where the students also had the opportunity to network with high-ranking IT professionals from all around the UK. Each finalist was presented with a cheque and certificate by the City of London Alderman Sheriff, Peter Estlin.

Thursday, 23 February 2017

Nick Trefethen wins the George Pólya Prize

Oxford Mathematician Nick Trefethen FRS has been awarded the prestigious George Pólya Prize by the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). The Prize for Mathematical Exposition, established in 2013, is awarded every two years to an outstanding expositor of the mathematical sciences.

Nick Trefethen is Professor of Numerical Analysis, University of Oxford, Fellow of Balliol College & Global Distinguished Professor, New York University. He is Head of Oxford Mathematics' Numerical Analysis Group. He is known for a succession of influential textbooks and monographs related to numerical mathematics, most recently 'Approximation Theory and Approximation Practice' which appeared in 2013. His next book will explore Ordinary Differential Equations.

Wednesday, 22 February 2017

Philip Maini awarded the Arthur T. Winfree Prize by the Society of Mathematical Biology

Oxford Mathematician Philip Maini has been awarded the Arthur T. Winfree Prize by the Society of Mathematical Biology for his work on mathematical modelling of spatiotemporal processes in biology and medicine. In the words of the citation Philip's work "has led to significant scientific advances not only in mathematics, but also in biology and the biomedical sciences. His mathematical oncology research has provided detailed insight into the design of combination cancer therapies."

Philip will receive his award at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Society, to be held at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City from July 17-20, 2017.

Thursday, 16 February 2017

Ursula Martin elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh

Oxford Mathematician and Computer Scientist Ursula Martin has been elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, joining over 1600 current fellows drawn from a wide range of disciplines – science & technology, arts, humanities, social science, business and public service.

Ursula's career has taken in Cambridge and Warwick and included spells across the Atlantic as well as recently at Queen Mary, University of London. From 1992 to 2002, she was Professor of Computer Science at the University of St Andrews in Scotland, the first female professor at the University since its foundation in 1411. Her work around theoretical Computer Science is accompanied by a passionate commitment to advancing the cause of women in science. She has also been a leading light in the recent study and promotion of the life and work of Victorian Mathematician Ada Lovelace and has been instrumental in examining and explaining Ada's mathematics as well as promoting her achievements as a woman.

 

 

Friday, 25 November 2016

Maria Bruna wins the Women of the Future Science award

Oxford Mathematician Maria Bruna has won the Women of the Future Science award. The Women of the Future Awards, founded by Pinky Lilani in 2006, were conceived to provide a platform for the pipeline of female talent in the UK. Now in their 11th year they recognise the inspirational young female stars of today and tomorrow. They are open to women aged 35 or under and celebrate talent across categories including business, culture, media, technology and more.

Maria's work focuses on partial differential equations, stochastic simulation algorithms and the application of these techniques to the modelling of biological and ecological systems. 

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