Past Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops

9 November 2012
09:45
to
11:00
Abstract

PLEASE NOTE EARLY START TIME TO AVOID CLASH WITH OCCAM GROUP MEETING

The human influenza A virus causes three to five million cases of severe illness and about 250 000 to 500 000 deaths each year. The 1918 Spanish Flu may have killed more than 40 million people. Yet, the underlying cause of the seasonality of the human influenza virus, its preferential transmission in winter in temperate climates, remains controversial. One of the major forms of the human influenza virus is a sphere made up of lipids selectively derived from the host cell along with specialized viral proteins. I have employed molecular dynamics simulations to study the biophysical properties of a single transmissible unit--an approximately spherical influenza A virion in water (i.e., to mimic the water droplets present in normal transmission of the virus). The surface area per lipid can't be calculated as a ratio of the surface area of the sphere to the number of lipids present as there are many different species of lipid for which different surface area values should be calculated. The 'mosaic' of lipid surface areas may be regarded quantitatively as a Voronoi diagram, but construction of a true spherical Voronoi tessellation is more challenging than the well-established methods for planar Voronoi diagrams. I describe my attempt to implement an approach to the spherical Voronoi problem (based on: Hyeon-Suk Na, Chung-Nim Lee, Otfried Cheong. Computational Geometry 23 (2002) 183–194) and the challenges that remain in the implementation of this algorithm.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
2 November 2012
10:00
to
12:33
various
Abstract

This is the session for our industrial sponsors to propose project ideas. Academic staff are requested to attend to help shape the problem statements and to suggest suitable internal supervisors for the projects. 

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
19 October 2012
10:00
to
11:31
Visitor
Abstract

Links between:

• storm tracks, sediment movement and an icy environment

• fluvial flash flooding to coastal erosion in the UK

Did you know that the recent Japanese, Chilean and Samoan tsunami all led to strong currents from resonance at the opposite end of the ocean?

Journey around the world, from the north Atlantic to the south Pacific, on a quest to explore and explain the maths of nature.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
1 June 2012
10:00
to
12:30
Andy Stove
Abstract

The issue of resource management arises with any sensor which is capable either of sensing only a part of its total field of view at any one time, or which is capable of having a number of operating modes, or both.

A very simple example is a camera with a telephoto lens.  The photographer has to decide what he is going to photograph, and whether to zoom in to get high resolution on a part of the scene, or zoom out to see more of the scene.  Very similar issues apply, of course, to electro-optical sensors (visible light or infra-red 'TV' cameras) and to radars.

The subject has, perhaps, been most extensively studied in relation to multi mode/multi function radars, where approaches such as neural networks, genetic algorithms and auction mechanisms have been proposed as well as more deterministic mangement schemes, but the methods which have actually been implemented have been much more primitive.

The use of multiple, disparate, sensors on multiple mobile, especially airborne, platforms adds further degrees of freedom to the problem - an extension is of growing interest.

The presentation will briefly review the problem for both the single-sensor and the multi-platform cases, and some of the approaches which have been proposed, and will highlight the remaining current problems.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
25 May 2012
11:00
to
12:30
Abstract

Please note the unusual start-time.

In order to run accurate electrochemical models of batteries (and other devices) it is necessary to know a priori the values of many geometric, electrical and electrochemical parameters (10-100 parameters) e.g. diffusion coefficients, electrode thicknesses etc. However a basic difficulty is that the only external measurements that can be made on cells without deconstructing and destroying them are surface temperature plus electrical measurements (voltage, current, impedance) at the terminals. An interesting research challenge therefore is the accurate, robust estimation of physically realistic model parameters based only on external measurements of complete cells. System identification techniques (from control engineering) including ‘electrochemical impedance spectroscopy’ (EIS) may be applied here – i.e. small signal frequency response measurement. However It is not clear exactly why and how impedance correlates to SOC/ SOH and temperature for each battery chemistry due to the complex interaction between impedance, degradation and temperature.

I will give a brief overview of some of the recent work in this area and try to explain some of the challenges in the hope that this will lead to a fruitful discussion about whether this problem can be solved or not and how best to tackle it.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops
4 May 2012
10:00
to
11:30
Gary Barnes
Abstract

ARKeX is a geophysical exploration company that conducts airborne gravity gradiometer surveys for the oil industry. By measuring the variations in the gravity field it is possible to infer valuable information about the sub-surface geology and help find prospective areas.

A new type of gravity gradiometer instrument is being developed to have higher resolution than the current technology. The basic operating principles are fairly simple - essentially measuring the relative displacement of two proof masses in response to a change in the gravity field. The challenge is to be able to see typical signals from geological features in the presence of large amounts of motional noise due to the aircraft. Fortunately, by making a gradient measurement, a lot of this noise is cancelled by the instrument itself. However, due to engineering tolerances, the instrument is not perfect and residual interference remains in the measurement.

Accelerometers and gyroscopes record the motional disturbances and can be used to mathematically model how the noise appears in the instrument and remove it during a software processing stage. To achieve this, we have employed methods taken from the field of system identification to produce models having typically 12 inputs and a single output. Generally, the models contain linear transfer functions that are optimised during a training stage where controlled accelerations are applied to the instrument in the absence of any anomalous gravity signal. After training, the models can be used to predict and remove the noise from data sets that contain signals of interest.

High levels of accuracy are required in the noise correction schemes to achieve the levels of data quality required for airborne exploration. We are therefore investigating ways to improve on our existing methods, or find alternative techniques. In particular, we believe non-linear and non-stationary models show benefits for this situation.

  • Industrial and Interdisciplinary Workshops

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