Past Kinderseminar

29 May 2013
11:30
Levon Haykazyan
Abstract
Concepts such as infinitesimal numbers and fluxions have been used by Leibnitz and Newton for the initial development of calculus. However, their non-rigorous nature has caused a lot of controversy and they have eventually been phased out by epsilon-delta definitions. In early 60s Abraham Robinson realised that methods of mathematical logic can be used to provide rigorous meaning to such concepts. This talk is a gentle introduction to some of Robinson's ideas.
8 May 2013
11:30
Thomas Wasserman
Abstract
Categorification is a fancy word for a process that is pretty ubiquitous in mathematics, though it is usually not referred to as "a thing". With the advent of higher category theory it has, however, become "a thing". I will explain what people mean by this "thing" (sneak preview: it involves replacing sets by categories) and hopefully convince you it is not quite as alien as it may seem and maybe even tempt you to let it infect some of your maths. I'll then explain how this fits into the context of higher categories.
1 May 2013
11:30
Elizaveta Frenkel
Abstract
<p>I shall talk about Subgroup Membership Problem for amalgamated products of finite rank free groups. I'm going to show how one can solve different versions of this problem in amalgams of free groups and give an estimate of the complexity of some algorithms involved. &nbsp;This talk is based on a joint paper with A. J. Duncan. </p>
6 March 2013
10:30
Emily Cliff -- Queen's Lecture C
Abstract
<p>We'll provide some motivation for the appearance of factorization algebras in physics, before discussing the definition of a factorization monoid. We'll then review the definition of a principal G-bundle and show how a factorization monoid can help us understand the moduli stack Bun_G of principal G-bundles.</p>
20 February 2013
10:30
Nicholas Cooney -- Queen's Lecture C
Abstract
I will give an introduction to The McKay Correspondence, relating the irreducible representations of a finite subgroup Γ ≤ SL2 (C), minimal resolutions of the orbit space C2 /Γ, and affine Dynkin diagrams.
13 February 2013
10:30
Ben Green (Oxford) -- Queen's Lecture C
Abstract
<p>A number is called transcendental if it is not algebraic, that is it does not satisfy a polynomial equation with rational coefficients. It is easy to see that the algebraic numbers are countable, hence the transcendental numbers are uncountable. Despite this fact, it turns out to be very difficult to determine whether a given number is transcendental. In this talk I will discuss some famous examples and the theorems which allow one to construct many different transcendental numbers. I will also give an outline of some of the many open problems in the field.</p>

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