Forthcoming Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
Today
14:00
Abstract

Manipulation of the genome function is important for understanding the underlying genetics for sophisticated phenotypes and developing gene therapy. Beyond gene editing, there is a major need for high-precision and quantitative technologies that allow controlling and studying gene expression and epigenetics in the genome. Towards this goal, we develop the concept and technologies for the use of the nuclease-deactivated CRISPR-Cas (dCas) system, repurposed from the Cas nuclease, for programmable transcription regulation, epigenetic modifications, and the 3D genome organization. We combine genome engineering and mathematical modeling to understand the noncoding DNA function including ultralong-distance enhancers and repetitive elements. We actively explore new tools that allow precise manipulation of the large-scale chromatin as a novel gene therapy. In this talk, I will highlight our works at the interface between genome engineering and chromatin biology for studying the noncoding genome and related applications.

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
Today
14:00
Dr Richard Earl, Dr Neil Laws, and Dr Vicky Neale
Abstract

What should you expect in intercollegiate classes?  What can you do to get the most out of them?  In this session, experienced class tutors will share their thoughts, including advice about online classes. 

All undergraduate and masters students welcome, especially Part B and MSc students attending intercollegiate classes. 

Today
14:00
James Timmins
Abstract

The Krull dimension is an ideal-theoretic invariant of an algebra. It has an important meaning in algebraic geometry: the Krull dimension of a commutative algebra is equal to the dimension of the corresponding affine variety/scheme. In my talk I'll explain how this idea can be transformed into a tool for measuring non-commutative rings. I'll illustrate this with important examples and techniques, and describe what is known for Iwasawa algebras of compact $p$-adic Lie groups.

  • Junior Algebra and Representation Theory Seminar
Today
15:00
Pablo Camara

Further Information: 

Pablo G. Cámara is an Assistant Professor of Genetics at the University of Pennsylvania and a faculty member of the Penn Institute for Biomedical Informatics. He received a Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics in 2006 from Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. He performed research in string theory for several years, with postdoctoral appointments at Ecole Polytechnique, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), and University of Barcelona. Fascinated by the extremely interesting and fundamental open questions in biology, in 2014 he shifted his research focus into problems in quantitative biology, and joined the groups of Dr. Rabadan, at Columbia University, and Dr. Levine, at the Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton). Building upon techniques from applied topology and statistics, he has devised novel approaches to the inference of ancestral recombination, human recombination mapping, the study of cancer heterogeneity, and the analysis of single-cell RNA-sequencing data from dynamic and heterogeneous cellular populations.

Abstract

One of the prevailing paradigms in data analysis involves comparing groups of samples to statistically infer features that discriminate them. However, many modern applications do not fit well into this paradigm because samples cannot be naturally arranged into discrete groups. In such instances, graph techniques can be used to rank features according to their degree of consistency with an underlying metric structure without the need to cluster the samples. Here, we extend graph methods for feature selection to abstract simplicial complexes and present a general framework for clustering-independent analysis. Combinatorial Laplacian scores take into account the topology spanned by the data and reduce to the ordinary Laplacian score when restricted to graphs. We show the utility of this framework with several applications to the analysis of gene expression and multi-modal cancer data. Our results provide a unifying perspective on topological data analysis and manifold learning approaches to the analysis of point clouds.

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

  • Applied Topology Seminar
25 October 2021
12:45
Mark Mezei

Further Information: 

NOTE UNUSUAL DAY AND TIME: Monday/12:45pm

Abstract

In recent years a fruitful interplay has been unfolding between quantum chaos and black holes. In the first part of the talk, I provide a sampler of these developments. Next, we study the fate of the black hole interior at late times in simple models of quantum gravity that have dual descriptions in terms of Random Matrix Theory. We find that the volume of the interior grows linearly at early times and then, due to non-perturbative effects, saturates at a time and towards a value that are exponentially large in the entropy of the black hole. This provides a confirmation of the complexity equals volume proposal of Susskind, since in chaotic systems complexity is also expected to exhibit the same behavior.

  • Random Matrix Theory Seminars
25 October 2021
14:15
Ilyas Khan
Abstract

In the mean curvature flow, translating solutions are an important model for singularity formation. In this talk, I will describe the asymptotic structure of 2D mean curvature flow translators embedded in R^3 which have finite total curvature, which turns out to be highly rigid. I will outline the proof of this asymptotic description, in particular focusing on some novel and unexpected features of this proof.

  • Geometry and Analysis Seminar
25 October 2021
15:45
Abstract

Since the mid 1980s, there have been hints of a connection between 2-dimensional field theories and elliptic cohomology. This lead to Stolz and Teichner's conjectured geometric model for the universal elliptic cohomology theory of topological modular forms (TMF) for which cocycles are 2-dimensional (supersymmetric) field theories. Properties of these field theories lead to the expected integrality and modularity properties of classes in TMF. However, the abundant torsion in TMF has always been mysterious from the field theory point of view. In this talk, we will describe a map from 2-dimensional field theories to a cohomology theory that approximates TMF. This map affords a cocycle description of certain torsion classes. In particular, we will explain how a choice of anomaly cancelation for the supersymmetric sigma model with target $S^3$ determines a cocycle representative of the generator of $\pi_3(TMF)=\mathbb{Z}/24$.

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

25 October 2021
16:00
TBA
Francesco Ballini

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

  • Junior Number Theory Seminar

Pages

Add to My Calendar