Forthcoming Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
21 January 2019
12:45
Magdalena Larfors
Abstract

In this talk, we show that a range of non-trivial SU(3) structures can be constructed on large classes of Calabi-Yau three-folds. Among the possible SU(3) structures we find Strominger-Hull systems, suitable for heterotic or type II string compactifications. These SU(3) structures of Strominger-Hull type have a non-vanishing and non-closed three-form flux which needs to be supported by source terms in the associated Bianchi identity. We discuss the possibility of finding such source terms and present first steps towards their explicit construction. Provided suitable sources exist, our methods lead to Calabi-Yau compactifications of string theory with a non Ricci-flat, physical metric which can be written down explicitly and in analytic form. The talk is based on the paper 1805.08499.

  • String Theory Seminar
21 January 2019
14:15
Yuuji Tanaka
Abstract

This talk is based on joint work with Dominic Joyce and Markus Upmeier. Issues we'd like to talk about are a) the orientability of moduli spaces that
appear in various gauge-theoretic problems; and b) how to orient those moduli spaces if they are orientable. We begin with briefly mentioning backgrounds and motivation, and recall basics in gauge theory such as the Atiyah-Hitchin-Singer complex and the Kuranishi model by taking the anti-self-dual instanton moduli space as an example. We then describe the orientability and canonical orientations of the anti-self-dual instanton moduli space, and other
gauge-theoretic moduli spaces which turn up in current research interests.

 

  • Geometry and Analysis Seminar
21 January 2019
15:45
Neil Strickland
Abstract


I will describe an extremely easy construction with formal group laws, and a 
slightly more subtle argument to show that it can be done in a coordinate-free
way with formal groups.  I will then describe connections with a range of other
phenomena in stable homotopy theory, although I still have many more 
questions than answers about these.  In particular, this should illuminate the
relationship between the Lambda algebra and the Dyer-Lashof algebra at the
prime 2, and possibly suggest better ways to think about related things at 
odd primes.  The Morava K-theory of symmetric groups is well-understood
if we quotient out by transfers, but somewhat mysterious if we do not pass
to that quotient; there are some suggestions that dilation will again be a key
ingredient in resolving this.  The ring $MU_*(\Omega^2S^3)$ is another
object for which we have quite a lot of information but it seems likely that 
important ideas are missing; dilation may also be relevant here.
 

21 January 2019
17:00
to
18:15
Alexander A. Kiselev
Abstract

The Euler equation describing motion of ideal fluids goes back to 1755. 
The analysis of the equation is challenging since it is nonlinear and nonlocal. Its solutions are often unstable and spontaneously generate small scales. The fundamental question of global regularity vs finite time singularity formation 
remains open for the Euler equation in three spatial dimensions. In this lecture, I will review the history of this question and its connection with the arguably greatest unsolved problem of classical physics, turbulence. Recent results on small scale and singularity formation in two dimensions and for a number of related models will also be presented.

  • Brooke Benjamin Lecture
22 January 2019
12:00
Abstract

We examine the relationship between social structure and sentiment through the analysis of a large collection of tweets about the Irish Marriage Referendum of 2015. We obtain the sentiment of every tweet with the hashtags #marref and #marriageref that was posted in the days leading to the referendum, and construct networks to aggregate sentiment and use it to study the interactions among users. Our analysis shows that the sentiment of outgoing mention tweets is correlated with the sentiment of incoming mentions, and there are significantly more connections between users with similar sentiment scores than among users with opposite scores in the mention and follower networks. We combine the community structure of the follower and mention networks with the activity level of the users and sentiment scores to find groups that support voting ‘yes’ or ‘no’ in the referendum. There were numerous conversations between users on opposing sides of the debate in the absence of follower connections, which suggests that there were efforts by some users to establish dialogue and debate across ideological divisions. Our analysis shows that social structure can be integrated successfully with sentiment to analyse and understand the disposition of social media users around controversial or polarizing issues. These results have potential applications in the integration of data and metadata to study opinion dynamics, public opinion modelling and polling.

22 January 2019
12:00
Dr Omer Gurdogan
Abstract

I will review the fishnet model, which is an integrable scalar QFT, obtained by an extreme gamma deformation of N=4 super Yang-Mills. The theory has a peculiar perturbative expansion in which many quantities at a fixed loop order are given by a single Feynman diagram. This feature allows the reinterpretation of Feynman loop integrals as integrable systems.

22 January 2019
12:45
Clint Wong
Abstract

Coastal vegetation has a well-known effect of attenuating waves; however, quantifiable measures of attenuation for general wave and vegetation scenarios are not well known. On the plant scale, there are extensive studies in predicting the dynamics of a single plant in an oscillatory flow. On the coastal scale however, there are yet to be compact models which capture the dynamics of both the flow and vegetation, when the latter exists in the form of a dense canopy along the bed. In this talk, we will discuss the open questions in the field and the modelling approaches involved. In particular, we investigate how micro-scale effects can be homogenised in space and how periodic motions can be averaged in time.

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar
22 January 2019
14:00
Trond Steihaug
Abstract

In this talk, we consider solving nonlinear systems of equations and the unconstrained minimization problem using Newton’s method methods from the Halley class. The methods in this class have in general local and third order rate of convergence while Newton’s method has quadratic convergence. In the unconstrained optimization case, the Halley methods will require the second and third derivative. Third-order methods will, in most cases, use fewer iterations than a second-order method to reach the same accuracy. However, the number of arithmetic operations per iteration is higher for third-order methods than for a second-order method. We will demonstrate that for a large class of problems, the ratio of the number of arithmetic operations of Halley’s method and Newton’s method is constant per iteration (independent of the number of unknowns).

We say that the sparsity pattern of the third derivative (or tensor) is induced by the sparsity pattern of the Hessian matrix. We will discuss some datastructures for matrices where the indices of nonzero elements of the tensor can be computed. Historical notes will be merged into the talk.

  • Numerical Analysis Group Internal Seminar
22 January 2019
14:15
Abstract

The classical Dirac operator is part of an osp(1|2) realisation inside the Weyl-Clifford algebra which is Pin-invariant. This leads to a multiplicity-free decomposition of the space of spinor-valued polynomials in irreducible modules for this Howe dual pair. In this talk we review an abstract generalisation A of the Weyl algebra that retains a realisation of osp(1|2) and we determine its centraliser algebra explicitly. For the special case where A is a rational Cherednik algebra, the centralizer algebra provides a refinement of the previous decomposition whose analogue was no longer irreducible in general. As an example, for the  group S3 in specific, we will examine the finite-dimensional irreducible modules of the centraliser algebra.

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