Forthcoming Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
Today
09:00
John Welliaveetil
Abstract

In 2010, Hrushovski--Loeser studied the homotopy type of the Berkovich analytification of a quasi-projective variety over a valued field. In this talk, we explore the extent to which some of their results might hold in a relative setting. More precisely, given a morphism of quasi-projective varieties over a valued field, we ask if we might construct deformation retractions of the analytifications of the source and target which are compatible with the analytification of the morphism and whose images are finite simplicial complexes. 

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

Today
14:00
Haim Avron
Abstract

Reconstructing continuous signals based on a small number of discrete samples is a fundamental problem across science and engineering. In practice, we are often interested in signals with ``simple'' Fourier structure -- e.g., those involving frequencies within a bounded range, a small number of frequencies, or a few blocks of frequencies. More broadly, any prior knowledge about a signal's Fourier power spectrum can constrain its complexity.  Intuitively, signals with more highly constrained Fourier structure require fewer samples to reconstruct.

We formalize this intuition by showing that, roughly speaking, a continuous signal from a given class can be approximately reconstructed using a number of samples equal to the statistical dimension of the allowed power spectrum of that class. We prove that, in nearly all settings, this natural measure tightly characterizes the sample complexity of signal reconstruction.

Surprisingly, we also show that, up to logarithmic factors, a universal non-uniform sampling strategy can achieve this optimal complexity for any class of signals. We present a simple, efficient, and general algorithm for recovering a signal from the samples taken. For bandlimited and sparse signals, our method matches the state-of-the-art. At the same time, it gives the first computationally and sample efficient solution to a broad range of problems, including multiband signal reconstruction and common kriging and Gaussian process regression tasks.

Our work is based on a novel connection between randomized linear algebra and the problem of reconstructing signals with constrained Fourier structure. We extend tools based on statistical leverage score sampling and column-based matrix reconstruction to the approximation of continuous linear operators that arise in the signal fitting problem. We believe that these extensions are of independent interest and serve as a foundation for tackling a broad range of continuous time problems using randomized methods.

This is joint work with Michael Kapralov, Cameron Musco, Christopher Musco, Ameya Velingker and Amir Zandieh

 

A link for this talk will be sent to our mailing list a day or two in advance.  If you are not on the list and wish to be sent a link, please send email to trefethen@maths.ox.ac.uk.

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
Today
16:00
Tanut Treetanthiploet
Abstract

Abstract: In many situations, one needs to decide between acting to reveal data about a system and acting to generate profit; this is the trade-off between exploration and exploitation. A simple situation where we face this trade-off is a multiarmed bandit problem, where one has M ‘bandits’ which generate reward from an unknown distribution, and one must choose which bandit to play at each time. The key difficulty in the multi-armed bandit problem is that the action often affects the information obtained. Due to the curse of dimensionality, solving the bandit problem directly is often computationally intractable.

In this talk, we will formulate a general class of the multi-armed bandit problem as a relaxed stochastic control problem. By introducing an entropy premium, we obtain a smooth asymptotic approximation to the value function. This yields a novel semi-index approximation of the optimal decision process, obtained numerically by solving a fixed point problem, which can be interpreted as explicitly balancing an exploration–exploitation trade-off.  Performance of the resulting Asymptotic Randomised Control (ARC) algorithm compares favourably with other approaches to correlated multi-armed bandits.

As an application of the multi-armed bandit, we also consider a multi-armed bandit problem where the observation from each bandit arrive from a Generalised Linear Model. We then use such model to consider a dynamic online pricing problem. The numerical simulation shows that the ARC algorithm also performs well compared to others.
============

  • Mathematical and Computational Finance Internal Seminar
Today
16:00
to
17:30
Lakshminarayanan Mahadevan

Further Information: 

We return this term to our usual flagship seminars given by notable scientists on topics that are relevant to Industrial and Applied Mathematics. 

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

Abstract

Kirigami, the relatively unheralded cousin of origami, is the art of cutting paper to articulate and deploy it as a whole. By varying the number, size, orientation and coordination of the cuts, artists have used their imagination and intuition to create remarkable sculptures in 2 and 3 dimensions. I will describe some of our attempts to quantify the inverse problem that artists routinely solve, combining elementary mathematical ideas, with computations and physical models. 

 

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
Today
16:00
Vern Paulsen

Further Information: 

Part of UK virtual operator algebras seminar: https://sites.google.com/view/uk-operator-algebras-seminar/home

Abstract

There are many constructions that yield C*-algebras. For example, we build them from groups, quantum groups, dynamical systems, and graphs. In this talk we look at C*-algebras that arise from a certain type of game. It turns out that the properties of the underlying game gives us very strong information about existence of traces of various types on the game algebra. The recent solution of the Connes Embedding Problem arises from a game whose algebra has a trace but no hyperlinear trace.


Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with tensor products of Hilbert spaces, the algebra of a discrete group, and free products of groups.

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

  • Functional Analysis Seminar
Tomorrow
14:00
Celine Guervilly
Abstract

Convection is the main heat transport process in the liquid cores of planets and the primary energy source for planetary magnetic fields. These convective motions are thought to be turbulent and strongly constrained by rotation. In this talk, I will discuss the large-scale flows (zonal jets and vortices) that form in this rapidly-rotating turbulent regime, which we explore with numerical models.

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

  • Mathematical Geoscience Seminar
Tomorrow
14:00
Abstract

One of the key objects in studying the Hilbert Scheme of points in the plane is a torus action of $(\mathbb{C}^*)^2$. The fixed points of this action correspond to monomial ideals in $\mathbb{C}[x,y]$, and this gives a connection between the geometry of Hilbert schemes and partition combinatorics. Using this connection, one can extract identities in partition combinatorics from algebro-geometric information and vice versa. I will give some examples of combinatorial identities where as yet the only proofs we have rely on the geometry of Hilbert schemes. If there is time, I will also sketch out a hope that such identities can also be seen by representations of appropriately chosen algebras.

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

  • Junior Algebra and Representation Theory Seminar
Tomorrow
14:00
Abstract

Genotype-phenotype associations can be results of direct effects, genetic nurturing effects and population stratification confounding (The nature of nurture: Effects of parental genotypes, Science, 2018, Deconstructing the sources of genotype-phenotype associations in humans, Science, 2019). Genotypes from parents and siblings of the proband can be used to statistically disentangle these effects. To maximize power, a comprehensive framework for utilizing various combinations of parents’ and siblings’ genotypes is introduced. Central to the approach is mendelian imputation, a method that utilizes identity by descent (IBD) information to non-linearly impute genotypes into untyped relatives using genotypes of typed individuals. Applying the method to UK Biobank probands with at least one parent or sibling genotyped, for an educational attainment (EA) polygenic score that has a R2 of 5.7% with EA, its predictive power based on direct genetic effect alone is demonstrated to be only about 1.4%. For women, the EA polygenic score has a bigger estimated direct effect on age-at-first-birth than EA itself.

The join button will be published on the right (Above the view all button) 30 minutes before the seminar starts (login required).

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar

Pages

Add to My Calendar