Forthcoming Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
Tomorrow
12:45
Antoine Bourget
Abstract

I will explore the geometrical structure of Higgs branches of quantum field theories with 8 supercharges in 3, 4, 5 and 6 dimensions. They are hyperkahler singularities, and as such they can be described by a Hasse diagram built from a family of elementary transitions. This corresponds physically to the partial Higgs mechanism. Using brane systems and recently introduced notions of magnetic quivers and quiver subtraction, we formalise the rules to obtain the Hasse diagrams.

  • String Theory Seminar
Tomorrow
14:15
Kevin McGerty

Further Information: 

Multiplicative quiver varieties are a variant of Nakajima's "additive" quiver varieties which were introduced by Crawley-Boevey and Shaw.
They arise naturally in the study of various moduli spaces, in particular in Boalch's work on irregular connections. In this talk we will discuss joint work with Tom Nevins which shows that the tautological classes for these varieties generate the largest possible subalgebra of the cohomology ring, namely the pure part.

 

  • Geometry and Analysis Seminar
Tomorrow
14:15
JAMES HENSMAN
Abstract

 Gaussian processes are well studied object in statistics and mathematics. In Machine Learning, we think of Gaussian processes as prior distributions over functions, which map from the index set to the realised path. To make Gaussian processes a practical tool for machine learning, we have developed tools around variational inference that allow for approximate computation in GPs leveraging the same hardware and software stacks that support deep learning. In this talk I'll give an overview of variational inference in GPs, show some successes of the method, and outline some exciting direction of potential future work.

  • Stochastic Analysis & Mathematical Finance Seminars
Tomorrow
15:45
EUGENE FEINBERG
Abstract

The classic Fatou lemma states that the lower limit of expectations is greater or equal than the expectation of the lower limit for a sequence of nonnegative random variables. This talk describes several generalizations of this fact including generalizations to converging sequences of probability measures. The three types of convergence of probability measures are considered in this talk: weak convergence, setwise convergence, and convergence in total variation. The talk also describes the Uniform Fatou Lemma (UFL) for sequences of probabilities converging in total variation. The UFL states the necessary and sufficient conditions for the validity of the stronger inequality than the inequality in Fatou's lemma. We shall also discuss applications of these results to sequential optimization problems with completely and partially observable state spaces. In particular, the UFL is useful for proving weak continuity of transition probabilities for posterior state distributions of stochastic sequences with incomplete state observations known under the name of Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes. These transition probabilities are implicitly defined by Bayes' formula, and general method for proving their continuity properties have not been available for long time. This talk is based on joint papers with Pavlo Kasyanov, Yan Liang, Michael Zgurovsky, and Nina Zadoianchuk.

  • Stochastic Analysis & Mathematical Finance Seminars
Tomorrow
15:45
Scott Taylor
Abstract

The tunnel number of a graph embedded in a 3-dimensional manifold is the fewest number of arcs needed so that the union of the graph with the arcs has handlebody exterior. The behavior of tunnel number with respect to connected sum of knots can vary dramatically, depending on the knots involved. However, a classical theorem of Scharlemann and Schultens says that the tunnel number of a composite knot is at least the number of factors. For theta graphs, trivalent vertex sum is the operation which most closely resembles the connected sum of knots. The analogous theorem of Scharlemann and Schultens no longer holds, however. I will provide a sharp lower bound for the tunnel number of composite theta graphs, using recent work on a new knot invariant which is additive under connected sum and trivalent vertex sum. This is joint work with Maggy Tomova.

Tomorrow
16:00
Fabio Cavalletti
Abstract

Localization technique permits to reduce full dimensional problems to possibly easier lower dimensional ones. During the last years a new approach to localization has been obtained using the powerful tools of optimal transport. Following this approach, we obtain quantitative versions of two relevant geometric inequalities  in comparison geometry as Levy-Gromov isoperimetric inequality (joint with F. Maggi and A. Mondino) and the spectral gap inequality (joint with A. Mondino and D. Semola). Both results are also valid in the more general setting of metric measure spaces verifying the so-called curvature dimension condition.

  • Partial Differential Equations Seminar
Tomorrow
16:00
Konstantinos Kartas
Abstract

The goal of the talk is to present a proof of the following statement:
Let (K,v) be an algebraic extension of (Q_p,v_p). We show that K is relatively decidable to its tilt K^♭, i.e. if K^♭ is decidable in the language of valued fields, then so is K. 
In the first part [of the talk], I will try to cover the necessary background needed from model theory and the theory of perfectoid fields.

  • Junior Number Theory Seminar
22 October 2019
12:00
Micheal Schaub
Abstract

In many applications we are confronted with the following scenario: we observe snapshots of data describing the state of a system at particular times, and based on these observations we want to infer the (dynamical) interactions between the entities we observe. However, often the number of samples we can obtain from such a process are far too few to identify the network exactly. Can we still reliable infer some aspects of the underlying system?
Motivated by this question we consider the following alternative system identification problem: instead of trying to infer the exact network, we aim to recover a (low-dimensional) statistical model of the network based on the observed signals on the nodes.  More concretely, here we focus on observations that consist of snapshots of a diffusive process that evolves over the unknown network. We model the (unobserved) network as generated from an independent draw from a latent stochastic block model (SBM), and our goal is to infer both the partition of the nodes into blocks, as well as the parameters of this SBM. We present simple spectral algorithms that provably solve the partition and parameter inference problems with high-accuracy.

22 October 2019
12:00
Oliver Schlotterer
Abstract

In this talk, I will describe new mathematical structures in the low-energy  expansion of one-loop string amplitudes. The insertion of external states on the open- and closed-string worldsheets requires integration over punctures on a cylinder boundary and a torus, respectively. Suitable bases of such integrals will be shown to obey simple first-order differential equations in the modular parameter of the surface. These differential equations will be exploited  to perform the integrals order by order in the inverse string tension, similar to modern strategies for dimensionally regulated Feynman integrals. Our method manifests the appearance of iterated integrals over holomorphic  Eisenstein series in the low-energy expansion. Moreover, infinite families of Laplace equations can be generated for the modular forms in closed-string  low-energy expansions.
 

22 October 2019
12:45
to
14:00
Oliver Sheridan-Methven
Abstract

Introducing cheap function proxies for quickly producing approximate random numbers, we show convergence of modified numerical schemes, and coupling between approximation and discretisation errors. We bound the cumulative roundoff error introduced by floating-point calculations, valid for 16-bit half-precision (FP16). We combine approximate distributions and reduced-precisions into a nested simulation framework (via multilevel Monte Carlo), demonstrating performance improvements achieved without losing accuracy. These simulations predominantly perform most of their calculations in very low precisions. We will highlight the motivations and design choices appropriate for SVE and FP16 capable hardware, and present numerical results on Arm, Intel, and NVIDIA based hardware.

 

  • Junior Applied Mathematics Seminar

Pages

Add to My Calendar