Past Forthcoming Seminars

19 February 2018
16:00
Lucas Ambrozio
Abstract

In a given ambient Riemannian manifold with boundary, geometric objects of particular interest are those properly embedded submanifolds that are critical points of the volume functional, when allowed variations are only those that preserve (but not necessarily fix) the ambient boundary. This variational condition translates into a quite nice geometric condition, namely, minimality and orthogonal intersection with the ambient boundary. Even when the ambient manifold is simply a ball in the Euclidean space, the theory of these objects is very rich and interesting. We would like to discuss several aspects of the theory, including our own contributions to the subject on topics such as: classification results, index estimates and compactness (joint works with different groups of collaborators - I. Nunes, A. Carlotto, B. Sharp, R. Buzano -  will be appropriately mentioned). 

  • Partial Differential Equations Seminar
19 February 2018
15:45
Clark Barwick
Abstract

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a local system on a connected topological manifold is completely determined by its attached monodromy representation of the fundamental group. Similarly, lisse ℓ-adic sheaves on a connected variety determine and are determined by representations of the profinite étale fundamental group. Now if one wants to classify constructible sheaves by representations in a similar manner, new invariants arise. In the topological category, this is the exit path category of Robert MacPherson (and its elaborations by David Treumann and Jacob Lurie), and since these paths do not ‘run around once’ but ‘run out’, we coined the term exodromy representation. In the algebraic category, we define a profinite ∞-category – the étale fundamental ∞-category – whose representations determine and are determined by constructible (étale) sheaves. We describe the étale fundamental ∞-category and its connection to ramification theory, and we summarise joint work with Saul Glasman and Peter Haine.

19 February 2018
14:15
Abstract

For many moduli problems, in order to construct a moduli space as a geometric invariant theory quotient, one needs to impose a notion of (semi)stability. Using recent results in non-reductive geometric invariant theory, we explain how to stratify certain moduli stacks in such a way that each stratum admits a coarse moduli space which is constructed as a geometric quotient of an action of a linear algebraic group with internally graded unipotent radical. As many stacks are
naturally filtered by quotient stacks, this involves describing how to stratify certain quotient stacks. Even for quotient stacks for reductive group actions, we see that non-reductive GIT is required to construct the coarse moduli spaces of the higher strata. We illustrate this point by studying the example of the moduli stack of coherent sheaves over a projective scheme. This is joint work with G. Berczi, J. Jackson and F. Kirwan.

  • Geometry and Analysis Seminar
19 February 2018
14:15
MOHAMMUD FOONDUN
Abstract

In this talk, we will show how sharp bounds on the moments of the solutions to some stochastic heat equations can lead to various qualitative properties of the solutions. A major part of the method consists of approximating the solution by “independent quantities”. These quantities together with the moments bounds give us sharp almost sure properties of the solution.

  • Stochastic Analysis Seminar
19 February 2018
12:45
Cobi Sonnenschein
Abstract

I will start with briefly describing the HISH ( Holography Inspired Hadronic String) model and reviewing the fits of the spectra of mesons, baryons, glue-balls and exotic hadrons. 

I will present the determination of the hadron strong decay widths. The main decay mechanism is that of a string splitting into two strings. The corresponding total decay width behaves as $\Gamma =\frac{\pi}{2}A T L $ where T and L are the tension and length of the string and A is a dimensionless universal constant. The partial width of a given decay mode is given by $\Gamma_i/\Gamma = \Phi_i \exp(-2\pi C m_\text{sep}^2/T$ where $\Phi_i$ is a phase space factor, $m_\text{sep}$ is the mass of the "quark" and "antiquark" created at the splitting point, and C is adimensionless coefficient close to unity. I will show the fits of the theoretical results to experimental data for mesons and baryons. I will examine both the linearity in L and the exponential suppression factor. The linearity was found to agree with the data well for mesons but less for baryons. The extracted coefficient for mesons $A = 0.095\pm  0.01$  is indeed quite universal. The exponential suppression was applied to both strong and radiative decays. I will discuss the relation with string fragmentation and jet formation. I will extract the quark-diquark structure of baryons from their decays. A stringy mechanism for Zweig suppressed decays of quarkonia will be proposed and will be shown to reproduce the decay width of  states. The dependence of the width on spin and symmetry will be discussed. I will further apply this model to the decays of glueballs and exotic hadrons.

 

 
 
 
  • String Theory Seminar
16 February 2018
15:00
Abstract

A wide range of chronic degenerative diseases of mankind result from the accumulation of altered forms of self proteins, resulting in cell toxicity, tissue destruction and chronic inflammatory processes in which the body’s immune system contributes to further cell death and loss of function. A hallmark of these conditions, which include major disease burdens such as Alzheimer’s Disease and type II diabetes, is the formation of long fibrillar polymers that are deposited in expanding tangled masses called plaques. Recently, similarities between these pathological accumulations and physiological mechanisms for organising intracellular space have been recognised, and formal demonstrations that amyloid accumulations form hydrogels have confirmed this link. We are interested in the pathological consequences of amyloid hydrogel formation and in order to study these processes we combine modelling of the assembly process with biophysical measurement of gelation and its cellular consequences.

Please see https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/qbiox-colloquium-dunn-school-seminar-hila...

for further details

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
16 February 2018
14:45
Abstract

T cells stimulation by antigen (peptide-MHC, pMHC) initiates adaptive immunity, a major factor contributing to vertebrate fitness. The T cell antigen receptor (TCR) present on the surface of T cells is the critical sensor for the recognition of and response to “foreign" entities, including microbial pathogens and transformed cells. Much is known about the complex molecular machine physically connected to the TCR to initiate, propagate and regulate signals required for cellular activation. However, we largely ignore the physical distribution, dynamics and reaction energetics of this machine before and after TCR binding to pMHC. I will illustrate a few basic notions of TCR signalling and potent quantitative in-cell approaches used to interpret TCR signalling behaviour. I will provide two examples where mathematical formalisation will be welcome to better understand the TCR signalling process.

 

Please see https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/qbiox-colloquium-dunn-school-seminar-hila... for further details.

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
16 February 2018
14:00
Abstract

Bacteria swim by rotating semi-rigid helical flagellar filaments, using an ion driven rotary motor embedded in the membrane. Bacteria are too small to sense a spatial gradient and therefore sense changes in time, and use the signals to bias their direction changing pattern to bias overall swimming towards a favourable environment. I will discuss how interdisciplinary research has helped us understand both the mechanism of motor function and its control by chemosensory signals.

Please see https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/qbiox-colloquium-dunn-school-seminar-hila...

for details.

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar

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