Past Forthcoming Seminars

24 May 2018
16:00
Edgar Assing
Abstract

We will briefly revisit Voronoi summation in its classical form and mention some of its many applications in number theory. We will then show how to use the global Whittaker model to create Voronoi type formulae. This new approach allows for a wide range of weights and twists. In the end we give some applications to the subconvexity problem of degree two $L$-functions. 

  • Number Theory Seminar
24 May 2018
16:00
to
17:30
Frederic Dias
Abstract

Statements in media about record wave heights being measured are more and more common, the latest being about a record wave of almost 24m in the Southern Ocean on 9 May 2018. We will review some of these wave measurements and the various techniques to measure waves. Then we will explain the various mechanisms that can produce extreme waves both in wave tanks and in the ocean. We will conclude by providing the mechanism that, we believe, explains some of the famous extreme waves. Note that extreme waves are not necessarily rogue waves and that rogue waves are not necessarily extreme waves.

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
24 May 2018
14:00
Prof. Michael Ferris
Abstract


In the past few decades, power grids across the world have become dependent on markets that aim to efficiently match supply with demand at all times via a variety of pricing and auction mechanisms. These markets are based on models that capture interactions between producers, transmission and consumers. Energy producers typically maximize profits by optimally allocating and scheduling resources over time. A dynamic equilibrium aims to determine prices and dispatches that can be transmitted over the electricity grid to satisfy evolving consumer requirements for energy at different locations and times. Computation allows large scale practical implementations of socially optimal models to be solved as part of the market operation, and regulations can be imposed that aim to ensure competitive behaviour of market participants.

Questions remain that will be outlined in this presentation.

Firstly, the recent explosion in the use of renewable supply such as wind, solar and hydro has led to increased volatility in this system. We demonstrate how risk can impose significant costs on the system that are not modeled in the context of socially optimal power system markets and highlight the use of contracts to reduce or recover these costs. We also outline how battery storage can be used as an effective hedging instrument.

Secondly, how do we guarantee continued operation in rarely occuring situations and when failures occur and how do we price this robustness?

Thirdly, how do we guarantee appropriate participant behaviour? Specifically, is it possible for participants to develop strategies that move the system to operating points that are not socially optimal?

Fourthly, how do we ensure enough transmission (and generator) capacity in the long term, and how do we recover the costs of this enhanced infrastructure?
 

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
24 May 2018
12:00
Abstract

In this talk I will start with a brief overview of the Cauchy problem for the Einstein equations of general relativity, and in particular the nonlinear stability of the trivial Minkowski solution in wave gauge as shown by Lindblad and Rodnianski. I will then discuss the Kaluza Klein spacetime of the form $R^{1+3} \times K$ where $K$ is the $n-$torus with the flat metric.  An interesting question to ask is whether this solution to the Einstein equations, viewed as an initial value problem, is stable to small perturbations of the initial data. Motivated by this problem, I will outline how the proof of stability in a restricted class of perturbations in fact follows from the work of Lindblad and Rodnianski, and discuss the physical justification behind this restriction. 

  • PDE CDT Lunchtime Seminar
23 May 2018
16:00
Abstract

Elements of a finitely generated group have a natural notion of length: namely the length of a shortest word over the generators that represents the element. This allows us to study the growth of such groups by considering the size of spheres with increasing radii. One current area of interest is the rationality or otherwise of the formal power series whose coefficients are the sphere sizes. I will describe a combinatorial way to study this series for the class of virtually abelian groups, introduced by Benson in the 1980s, and then outline its applications to other types of growth series.

  • Junior Topology and Group Theory Seminar
22 May 2018
17:00
Karl-Mikael Perfekt
Abstract

The Neumann-Poincare (NP) operator (or the double layer potential) has classically been used as a tool to solve the Dirichlet and Neumann problems of a domain. It also serves as a prominent example in non-self adjoint spectral theory, due to its unexpected behaviour for domains with singularities. Recently, questions from materials science have revived interest in the spectral properties of the NP operator on domains with rough features. I aim to give an overview of recent developments, with particular focus on the NP operator's action on the energy space of the domain. The energy space framework ties together Poincare’s efforts to solve the Dirichlet problem with the operator-theoretic symmetrisation theory of Krein. I will also indicate recent work for domains in 3D with conical points. In this situation, we have been able to describe the spectrum both for boundary data in $L^2$ and for data in the energy space. In the former case, the essential spectrum consists of the union of countably many self-intersecting curves in the plane, and outside of this set the index may be computed as the winding number with respect to the essential spectrum. In the latter case the essential spectrum consists of a real interval.

  • Functional Analysis Seminar
22 May 2018
15:45
Navid Nabijou
Abstract

Given a smooth variety X containing a smooth divisor Y, the relative Gromov-Witten invariants of (X,Y) are defined as certain counts of algebraic curves in X with specified orders of tangency to Y. Their intrinsic interest aside, they are an important part of any Gromov-Witten theorist’s toolkit, thanks to their role in the celebrated “degeneration formula.” In recent years these invariants have been significantly generalised, using techniques in logarithmic geometry. The resulting “log Gromov-Witten invariants” are defined for a large class of targets, and in particular give a rigorous definition of relative invariants for (X,D) where D is a normal crossings divisor. Besides being more general, these numbers are  intimately related to constructions in Mirror Symmetry, via the Gross-Siebert program. In this talk, we will describe a recursive formula for computing the invariants of (X,D) in genus zero. The result relies on a comparison theorem which expresses the log Gromov-Witten invariants as classical (i.e. non log-geometric) objects.
 

  • Algebraic Geometry Seminar
22 May 2018
14:30
Dr Dante Kalise
Abstract

In this talk we address the numerical approximation of Mean Field Games with local couplings. For finite difference discretizations of the Mean Field Game system, we follow a variational approach, proving that the schemes can be obtained as the optimality system of suitably defined optimization problems. In order to prove the existence of solutions of the scheme with a variational argument, the monotonicity of the coupling term is not used, which allow us to recover general existence results. Next, assuming next that the coupling term is monotone, the variational problem is cast as a convex optimization problem for which we study and compare several proximal type methods. These algorithms have several interesting features, such as global convergence and stability with respect to the viscosity parameter. We conclude by presenting numerical experiments assessing the performance of the proposed methods. In collaboration with L. Briceno-Arias (Valparaiso, CL) and F. J. Silva (Limoges, FR).

  • Numerical Analysis Group Internal Seminar

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