Past Forthcoming Seminars

18 May 2018
13:00
Martin Tegner
Abstract

The local volatility model is a celebrated model widely used for pricing and hedging financial derivatives. While the model’s main appeal is its capability of reproducing any given surface of observed option prices—it provides a perfect fit—the essential component of the model is a latent function which can only be unambiguously determined in the limit of infinite data. To (re)construct this function, numerous calibration methods have been suggested involving steps of interpolation and extrapolation, most often of parametric form and with point-estimates as result. We seek to look at the calibration problem in a probabilistic framework with a nonparametric approach based on Gaussian process priors. This immediately gives a way of encoding prior believes about the local volatility function, and a hypothesis model which is highly flexible whilst being prone to overfitting. Besides providing a method for calibrating a (range of) point-estimate, we seek to draw posterior inference on the distribution over local volatility to better understand the uncertainty attached with the calibration. Further, we seek to understand dynamical properties of local volatility by augmenting the hypothesis space with a time dimension. Ideally, this gives us means of inferring predictive distributions not only locally, but also for entire surfaces forward in time.

  • Mathematical Finance Internal Seminar
18 May 2018
12:00
Abstract

This talk focuses on algebraic and combinatorial-topological problems motivated by neuroscience. Neural codes allow the brain to represent, process, and store information about the world. Combinatorial codes, comprised of binary patterns of neural activity, encode information via the collective behavior of populations of neurons. A code is called convex if its codewords correspond to regions defined by an arrangement of convex open sets in Euclidean space. Convex codes have been observed experimentally in many brain areas, including sensory cortices and the hippocampus,where neurons exhibit convex receptive fields. What makes a neural code convex? That is, how can we tell from the intrinsic structure of a code if there exists a corresponding arrangement of convex open sets?

This talk describes how to use tools from combinatorics and commutative algebra to uncover a variety of signatures of convex and non-convex codes.

This talk is based on joint works with Aaron Chen and Florian Frick, and with Carina Curto, Elizabeth Gross, Jack Jeffries, Katie Morrison, Mohamed Omar, Zvi Rosen, and Nora Youngs.

  • Applied Algebra and Topology
17 May 2018
17:00
Michael Atiyah
Abstract

Archimedes, who famously jumped out of his bath shouting "Eureka", also invented $\pi$. 

Euler invented $e$ and had fun with his formula $e^{2\pi i} = 1$

The world is full of important numbers waiting to be invented. Why not have a go ?

Michael Atiyah is one of the world's foremost mathematicians and a pivotal figure in twentieth and twenty-first century mathematics. His lecture will be followed by an interview with Sir John Ball, Sedleian Professor of Natural Philosophy here in Oxford where Michael will talk about his lecture, his work and his life as a mathematician.

Please email external-relations@maths.ox.ac.uk to register.

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

17 May 2018
16:00
to
17:30
Abstract

High-frequency realized variance approaches offer great promise for 
estimating asset prices’ covariation, but encounter difficulties 
connected to the Epps effect. This paper models the Epps effect in a 
stochastic volatility setting. It adds dependent noise to a factor 
representation of prices. The noise both offsets covariation and 
describes plausible lags in information transmission. Non-synchronous 
trading, another recognized source of the effect, is not required. A 
resulting estimator of correlations and betas performs well on LSE 
mid-quote data, lending empirical credence to the approach.

  • Mathematical and Computational Finance Seminar
17 May 2018
16:00
to
17:30
Professor John Lister
Abstract

The peeling of an elastic sheet away from thin layer of viscous fluid is a simply-stated and generic problem, that involves complex interactions between flow and elastic deformation on a range of length scales. 

I will illustrate the possibilities by considering theoretically and experimentally the injection and spread of viscous fluid beneath a flexible elastic lid; the injected fluid forms a blister, which spreads by peeling the lid away at the  perimeter of the blister. Among the many questions to be considered are the mechanisms for relieving the elastic analogue of the contact-line problem, whether peeling is "by bending" or "by pulling", the stability of the peeling front, and the effects of a capillary meniscus when peeling is by air injection. The result is a plethora of dynamical regimes and asymptotic scaling laws.

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
17 May 2018
16:00
Cindy Tsang
Abstract

It is an old problem in number theory to count number fields of a fixed degree and having a fixed Galois group for its Galois closure, ordered by their absolute discriminant, say. In this talk, I shall discuss some background of this problem, and then report a recent work with Stanley Xiao. In our paper, we considered quartic $D_4$-fields whose ring of integers has a certain nice algebraic property, and we counted such fields by their conductor.

  • Number Theory Seminar
17 May 2018
16:00
Jacob Gross
Abstract

The Grojnowski-Nakajima theorem states that the direct sum of the homologies of the Hilbert schemes on n points on an algebraic surface is an irreducible highest weight representation of an infinite-dimensional Heisenberg superalgebra. We present an idea to rederive the Grojnowski-Nakajima theorem using Halpern-Leistner's categorical Kirwan surjectivity theorem and Joyce's theorem that the homology of a moduli space of sheaves is a vertex algebra. We compute the homology of the moduli stack of perfect complexes of coherent sheaves on a smooth quasi-projective variety X, identify it as a (modified) lattice vertex algebra on the Lawson homology of X, and explain its relevance to the aforementioned problem.

  • Junior Geometry and Topology Seminar
17 May 2018
14:00
Dr. Fehmi Cirak
Abstract

Advances in manufacturing technologies, most prominently in additive manufacturing or 3d printing, are making it possible to fabricate highly optimised products with increasing geometric and hierarchical complexity. This talk will introduce our ongoing work on design optimisation that combines CAD-compatible geometry representations, multiresolution geometry processing techniques and immersed finite elements with classical shape and topology calculus. As example applications,the shape optimisation of mechanical structures and electromechanical components, and the topology optimisation of lattice-skin structures will be discussed.

  • Computational Mathematics and Applications Seminar
16 May 2018
16:00
Sam Shepherd
Abstract

Thompson's group F is a group of homeomorphisms of the unit interval which exhibits a strange mix of properties; on the one hand it has some self-similarity type properties one might expect of a really big group, but on the other hand it is finitely presented. I will give a proof of finite generation by expressing elements as pairs of binary trees.

  • Junior Topology and Group Theory Seminar

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