Forthcoming Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
13 June 2019
12:00
Yuning Liu
Abstract

We study the small Deborah number limit of the Doi-Onsager equation for the dynamics of nematic liquid crystals. This is a Smoluchowski-type equation that characterizes the evolution of a number density function, depending upon both particle position and its orientation vector, which lies on the unit sphere. We prove that, in the low temperature regime, when the Deborah number tends to zero, the family of solutions with rough initial data near local equilibria will converge to a local equilibrium distribution prescribed by a weak solution of the harmonic map heat flow into the sphere. This flow is a special case of the gradient flow to the Oseen-Frank energy functional for nematic liquid crystals and the existence of its global weak solution was first obtained by Y.M Chen, using Ginzburg-Landau approximation.  The key ingredient of our result is to show the strong compactness of the family of number density functions and the proof relies on the strong compactness of the corresponding second moment (or the Q-tensor), a spectral decomposition of the linearized operator near the limiting local equilibrium distribution, as well as the energy dissipation estimates.  This is a joint work with Wei Wang in Zhejiang university.
 

  • PDE CDT Lunchtime Seminar
13 June 2019
16:00
to
17:30
Dr Tom Shearer
Abstract

Tendons are vital connective tissues that anchor muscle to bone to allow the transfer of forces to the skeleton. They exhibit highly non-linear viscoelastic mechanical behaviour that arises due to their complex, hierarchical microstructure, which consists of fibrous subunits made of the protein collagen. Collagen molecules aggregate to form fibrils with diameters of tens to hundreds of nanometres, which in turn assemble into larger fibres called fascicles with diameters of tens to hundreds of microns. In this talk, I will discuss the relationship between the three-dimensional organisation of the fibrils and fascicles and the macroscale mechanical behaviour of the tendon. In particular, I will show that very simple constitutive behaviour at the microscale can give rise to highly non-linear behaviour at the macroscale when combined with geometrical effects.

 

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
14 June 2019
14:00
Abstract


Cellular migration can be affected by short-range interactions between cells such as volume exclusion, long-range forces such as chemotaxis, or reactions such as phenotypic switching. In this talk I will discuss how to incorporate these processes into a discrete or continuum modelling frameworks. In particular, we consider a system with two types of diffusing hard spheres that can react (switch type) upon colliding. We use the method of matched asymptotic expansions to obtain a systematic model reduction, consisting of a nonlinear reaction-diffusion system of equations. Finally, we demonstrate how this approach can be used to study the effects of excluded volume on cellular chemotaxis. This is joint work with Dan Wilson and Helen Byrne.
 

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
17 June 2019
14:15
Abstract

It is well known that a rough path is uniquely determined by its signature (the collection of global iterated path integrals) up to tree-like pieces. However, the proof the uniqueness theorem is non-constructive and does not give us information about how quantitative properties of the path can be explicitly recovered from its signature. In this talk, we examine the quantitative relationship between the local p-variation of a rough path and the tail asymptotics of its signature for the simplest type of rough paths ("line segments"). What lies at the core of the work a novel technique based on the representation theory of complex semisimple Lie algebras. 

This talk is based on joint work with Horatio Boedihardjo and Nikolaos Souris

  • Stochastic Analysis Seminar

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