Oxford Mathematicians win Basic and Frontiers of Science Awards

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Two Oxford Mathematicians, Andrew Wiles and Marc Lackenby, have received Basic Science and Frontiers of Science awards.

Andrew receives a Basic Science Lifetime Award both for his famous proving of Fermat's Last Theorem and its subsequent influence on the development of the field, and for the inspiration he has provided to many aspiring mathematicians.

Marc receives a Frontiers of Science award for his paper 'A polynomial upper bound on Reidemeister moves' published in the Annals of Mathematics. Marc's expertise lies in low-dimensional topology and group theory. His paper resolved a longstanding open problem in knot theory.

The awards will be presented at the 2024 International Congress of Basic Science which takes place in Beijing, China, next week.

Read more about the awards

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The Inaugural Vicky Neale Public Lecture: Tim Harford - The Counting Project

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The Vicky Neale Public Lecture recognises the invaluable contribution to mathematical education of the late Vicky Neale. In this lecture, economist and broadcaster Tim Harford looks at how data built the modern world - and how we can use it to build a better one.

5pm, Wednesday 10 July, 2024
Mathematical Institute,Oxford

Please email @email to register to attend in person.

The lecture will be broadcast on the Oxford Mathematics YouTube Channel on Wednesday 31 July at 5-6pm and any time after (no need to register for the online version).

The Vicky Neale Public Lectures are a partnership between the Clay Mathematics Institute, PROMYS and Oxford Mathematics. The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

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Three London Mathematical Society (LMS) Prizes for Oxford Mathematicians

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Gui-Qiang G. Chen is awarded the Pólya Prize for his deep research into nonlinear partial differential equations, and in particular his rigorous theoretical analysis of the equations of gas dynamics, especially those involving transonic flows.

Emmanuel Breuillard is awarded the Fröhlich Prize for his landmark work on groups and their actions, masterly combining in ingenious ways algebraic groups, combinatorics, number theory, Diophantine approximation, topology and C*-algebras. His work is notable for its originality, conceptual clarity, elegance and depth.

James Newton is awarded a Whitehead Prize for his groundbreaking contributions to the Langlands programme, and in particular for his spectacular joint proof with Jack Thorne of symmetric power functoriality for holomorphic modular forms.

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3-Minute Thesis Competition

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So what have these six things got in common?
 

They are the subject of Oxford Mathematics postgraduate student theses, displaying how much ground maths can cover. You can watch the six students present their research in just one slide in our 3-Minute Thesis Competition.

Starring (at 3 minute intervals):
Tommy Muller - The Geometry of Tensors and Higher Quivers
Javier Chico Vasquez - The Mathematics of Balance
Sofía Marlasca Aparicio - Purely Inseparable Galois Theory
Kit Gallagher - How would Charles Darwin treat cancer?
Ouissal Moumou - Quantum Pre- and Post-Selection Paradoxes
Wojciech Aleksander Woloszyn - The Mathematics of Possibility

 

Please contact us with feedback and comments about this page. Created on 30 Jun 2024 - 15:49.

A postdoc and a professor

James and Lasse still

Have you ever wondered what happens in a research meeting between a professor and a postdoc or graduate student?

As part of our demystifying of mathematical (and not just mathematical) life, Fields Medallist James Maynard and postdoctorcal researcher Lasse Grimmelt allowed us  to film one of their meetings. The mathematics may be very specific, but it is the interaction and process that has proved so interesting to the outside world, mathematical or not. And perhaps, so recognisable.

James and Lasse are anayltic number theorists. Lasse researches the connection between the spectral theory of automorphic forms and number theoretical problems like the twin primes conjecture. In this meeting Lasse talks to James about applying his new insights, for example their potential to improve results related to primes in large arithmetic progressions, particularly their application on prime gaps.


 

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From Ronald Ross to ChatGPT: the birth and strange life of the random walk - Jordan Ellenberg

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Between 1905 and 1910 the idea of the random walk was invented simultaneously and independently by multiple people in multiple countries for completely different purposes. In the UK, the story starts with Ronald Ross and the problem of mosquito control, but elsewhere, the theory was being developed in domains from physics to finance to winning a theological argument (really!).

In this Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture, Jordan will tell some part of this story and also gesture at ways that random walks (or Markov processes, named after the theological arguer) underlie current approaches to artificial intelligence; he will touch on some of his own work with DeepMind and speculate about the capabilities of those systems now and in the future.

Jordan Ellenberg is a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is the author of best-selling works of non-fiction and fiction, and has written and lectured extensively for a general audience about the wonders of mathematics for over fifteen years.

Please email @email to register to attend in person.

The lecture will be broadcast on the Oxford Mathematics YouTube Channel on Thursday 18 July at 5-6pm and any time after (no need to register for the online version).

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Please contact us with feedback and comments about this page. Created on 16 Jun 2024 - 19:56.

Alain Goriely appointed Gresham Professor of Geometry

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Oxford Mathematician Alain Goriely has been appointed Gresham Professor of Geometry. The Professor of Geometry at Gresham College, London, is one of ten lecturers whose roles are to give free educational lectures to the general public, the purpose for which the college was founded in 1597 in the will of Thomas Gresham. In total there are over 130 public lectures a year, all of which are online.

Alain Goriely FRS is the Professor of Mathematical Modelling here in Oxford, Director of the Oxford Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (OCIAM), the Director of the International Brain and Mechanics Lab (IBMATL) with Antoine Jérusalem, and a fellow of St Catherine’s College

Alain's work ranges across many areas of applied mathematics including the mechanics of biological growth, the modelling of the brain, the theoretical foundations of mechanics, the dynamics of curves, knots, and rods, the modelling of cancer, the development of new photovoltaic devices, the modelling of lithium-ion batteries and, more generally the study and development of mathematical methods for applied sciences.

Alain has also given many public lectures on his work and mathematics more broadly and was formerly Director of External Relations for Oxford Mathematics in which role he instigated and developed the popular Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture series.

In his first series of lectures, Alain will explore how mathematics is being used to understand the brain.

Alain is the author of Morphoelasticity: The Mathematics and Mechanics of Biological Growth' and 'Applied Mathematics: A Very Short Introduction'.

Please contact us with feedback and comments about this page. Created on 10 Jun 2024 - 09:00.

Show Me the Maths

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'Show Me the Maths' gets down to the detail of the mathematics that takes place round here. These short, 90-second films, deliberately display the complexity of our subject. They span fundamental mathematics such as quasi-coherent sheaves and Dirichlet L-functions while also taking in our work in applied mathematics, such as the modelling of cancer treatment and efforts to make complex mathematics accessible to companies who need to use it in product development. And for good measure, we feature our research in to the history of mathematics, in this case the treatment of Jewish mathematicians in Soviet Russia.

You can access the full playlist here while below are two of films starring number theorist Lasse Grimmelt and mathematical historian Petra Stankovic.

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The Potential for AI in Science and Mathematics - Terence Tao

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Oxford Mathematics London Public Lecture - The Potential for AI in Science and Mathematics - Terence Tao

Wednesday 17th July 2024, 6.15 - 7.30pm, Science Museum, London, SW7

Terry Tao is one of the world's leading mathematicians and winner of many awards including the Fields Medal. He is Professor of Mathematics at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Following his talk Terry will be in conversation with fellow mathematician Po-Shen Loh.

Please email @email to register to attend in person. Please note this lecture is in London.

This lecture has now sold out, but it will be broadcast on the Oxford Mathematics YouTube Channel on Wednesday 7th August at 5pm and any time after (no need to register for the online version). 

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Please contact us with feedback and comments about this page. Created on 29 May 2024 - 11:42.

Emmanuel Breuillard elected Fellow of the Royal Society

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Oxford Mathematician Emmanuel Breuillard has been elected Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), the UK’s national academy of sciences and the oldest science academy in continuous existence.

Emmanuel is Professor of Pure Mathematics in Oxford and a Fellow of Worcester College. He works at the interface between algebra and analysis. He has made contributions to the study of finite and infinite groups, using a wealth of methods from diverse areas of mathematics, including combinatorics, mathematical logic, probability theory, dynamics, or diophantine analysis. 

Among them feature his work on free subgroups of Lie groups, the development (with Ben Green and Terence Tao) of a structure theory for approximate groups, and his study (with Peter Varju) of mixing and equidistribution phenomena for random walks on groups with applications to self-similarity and random polynomials. He was a recipient of an EMS Prize in 2012, was an invited speaker at the ICM in 2014 and is a member of Academia Europaea since 2021. 

Oxford Mathematics now has 34 Fellows of the Royal Society among its current and retired members: Fernando Alday, John Ball, Bryan Birch, Martin Bridson, Philip Candelas, Marcus du Sautoy, Artur Ekert, Alison Etheridge, Alain Goriely, Ian Grant, Ben Green, Roger Heath-Brown, Nigel Hitchin, Ehud Hrushovski, Ioan James, Dominic Joyce, Jon Keating, Frances Kirwan, Terry Lyons, Philip Maini, Vladimir Markovic, James Maynard, Jim Murray, John Ockendon, Roger Penrose, Jonathan Pila, Graeme Segal, Endre Süli, Martin Taylor, Ulrike Tillmann, Nick Trefethen, Andrew Wiles, Alex Wilkie, and Emmanuel himself, of course.

Please contact us with feedback and comments about this page. Created on 16 May 2024 - 00:08.