Forthcoming Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
1 February 2018
16:00
to
17:30
Renaud Lambiotte
Abstract

In this talk, I will present some recent results exploring the connections between dynamical systems and network science. I will particularly focus on large-scale structures and their dynamical interpretation. Those may correspond to communities/clusters or classes of dynamically equivalent nodes. If time allows, I will also present results where the underlying network structure is unknown and where communities are directly inferred from time series observed on the nodes.

 

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
2 February 2018
14:00
Abstract

The ability of cells to sense and respond to the mechanical properties of their environments is fundamental to cellular behaviour, with stiffness found to be a key control parameter. The physical mechanisms underpinning mechanosensing are, however, not well understood. I here consider the key physical cellular behaviours of active contractility of the internal cytoskeleton and cell growth, coupling these into mechanical models. These models suggest new distinct mechanisms of mechanotransduction in cells and tissues.

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar
2 February 2018
16:00
Mike Giles
Abstract

In this talk I will discuss the upcoming REF2021 and its significance for early career researchers (research fellows and postdocs) including

  • why it is so important to all UK maths departments
  • why the timing of it could have important career consequences for ECRs
  • publication issues such as quality versus quantity, and choice of journal
  • the importance of Impact Case Studies
     
2 February 2018
17:15
Tom Nichols
Abstract

Today, everyone knows everything: with only a quick trip through WebMD or Wikipedia, average citizens believe themselves to be on an equal intellectual footing with doctors and diplomats. All voices, even the most ridiculous, demand to be taken with equal seriousness, and any claim to the contrary is dismissed as undemocratic elitism. Tom Nichols argues that in this climate, democratic institutions themselves are in danger of falling either to populism or to technocracy- or in the worst case, a combination of both.

Tom Nichols is Professor of National Security Affairs at the US Naval War College, an adjunct professor at the Harvard Extension School, and a former aide in the U.S. Senate. His latest book is The Death of Expertise: The Campaign Against Established Knowledge and Why it Matters. This lecture is based on that book.

All welcome. No need to book.

5 February 2018
14:15
Ailsa Keating
Abstract

In real dimension two, the symplectic mapping class group of a surface agrees with its `classical' mapping class group, whose properties are well-understood. To what extend do these generalise to higher-dimensions? We consider specific pairs of symplectic manifolds (S, M), where S is a surface, together with collections of Lagrangian spheres in S and in M, say v_1, ...,v_k and V_1, ...,V_k, that have analogous intersection patterns, in a sense that we will make precise. Our main theorem is that any relation between the Dehn twists in the V_i must also hold between Dehn twists in the v_i. Time allowing, we will give some corollaries, such as embeddings of certain interesting groups into auto-equivalence groups of Fukaya categories.

 

  • Geometry and Analysis Seminar
5 February 2018
14:15
DAVID PROEMEL
Abstract

Based on the notion of paracontrolled distributions, existence and uniqueness results are presented for rough convolution equations. In particular, this wide class of equations includes rough differential equations with possible delay, stochastic Volterra equations, and moving average equations driven by Lévy processes. The talk is based on a joint work with Mathias Trabs.

 

  • Stochastic Analysis Seminar

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