Forthcoming Seminars

Please note that the list below only shows forthcoming events, which may not include regular events that have not yet been entered for the forthcoming term. Please see the past events page for a list of all seminar series that the department has on offer.

Past events in this series
21 February 2019
16:00
to
17:30
Professor Kody Law
Abstract

This talk will concern the problem of inference when the posterior measure involves continuous models which require approximation before inference can be performed. Typically one cannot sample from the posterior distribution directly, but can at best only evaluate it, up to a normalizing constant. Therefore one must resort to computationally-intensive inference algorithms in order to construct estimators. These algorithms are typically of Monte Carlo type, and include for example Markov chain Monte Carlo, importance samplers, and sequential Monte Carlo samplers. The multilevel Monte Carlo method provides a way of optimally balancing discretization and sampling error on a hierarchy of approximation levels, such that cost is optimized. Recently this method has been applied to computationally intensive inference. This non-trivial task can be achieved in a variety of ways. This talk will review 3 primary strategies which have been successfully employed to achieve optimal (or canonical) convergence rates – in other words faster convergence than i.i.d. sampling at the finest discretization level. Some of the specific resulting algorithms, and applications, will also be presented.

  • Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar
22 February 2019
14:00
Abstract

Computational nucleic acid devices show great potential for enabling a broad range of biotechnology applications, including smart probes for molecular biology research, in vitro assembly of complex compounds, high-precision in vitro disease diagnosis and, ultimately, computational therapeutics inside living cells. This diversity of applications is supported by a range of implementation strategies, including nucleic acid strand displacement, localisation to substrates, and the use of enzymes with polymerase, nickase and exonuclease functionality. However, existing computational design tools are unable to account for these different strategies in a unified manner. This talk presents a programming language that allows a broad range of computational nucleic acid systems to be designed and analysed. We also demonstrate how similar approaches can be incorporated into a programming language for designing genetic devices that are inserted into cells to reprogram their behaviour. The language is used to characterise the genetic components for programming populations of cells that communicate and self-organise into spatial patterns. More generally, we anticipate that languages and software for programming molecular and genetic devices will accelerate the development of future biotechnology applications.

  • Mathematical Biology and Ecology Seminar

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