Forthcoming events in this series


Wed, 14 Feb 2024
17:00
Lecture Theatre 1

Logging the World - Oliver Johnson

Oliver Johnson
(University of Bristol)
Further Information

During the pandemic, you may have seen graphs of data plotted on strange-looking (logarithmic) scales. Oliver will explain some of the basics and history of logarithms, and show why they are a natural tool to represent numbers ranging from COVID data to Instagram followers. In fact, we’ll see how logarithms can even help us understand information itself in a mathematical way.

Oliver Johnson is Professor of Information Theory in the School of Mathematics at the University of Bristol. His research involves randomness and uncertainty, and includes collaborations with engineers, biologists and computer scientists. During the pandemic he became a commentator on the daily COVID numbers, through his Twitter account and through appearances on Radio 4 and articles for the Spectator. He is the author of the book Numbercrunch (2023), which is designed to help a general audience understand the value of maths as a toolkit for making sense of the world.

Please email @email to register.

The lecture will be broadcast on the Oxford Mathematics YouTube Channel on Wednesday 06 March at 5-6pm and any time after (no need to register for the online version).

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

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Thu, 23 Nov 2023
17:00
Lecture Theatre 1

A Mathematical Journey through Literature - Sarah Hart

Sarah Hart
(Birkbeck, University of London)
Further Information

In this lecture, Sarah will explore the many connections between mathematics and literature. She'll show the hidden mathematical structures behind everything from poetry to novels, and reveal some of the beautiful mathematical imagery and symbolism in fiction, from simple fairy tales to classics like Moby-Dick. Her goal is to show that not only are mathematics and literature inextricably linked, but that understanding these links can enhance our enjoyment of both. 

Sarah Hart is Professor of Mathematics at Birkbeck, University of London, the Gresham Professor of Geometry in Gresham College and author of Once Upon a Prime: the Wondrous Connections between Mathematics and Literature.

Please email @email to register to attend in person.

The lecture will be broadcast on the Oxford Mathematics YouTube Channel on Thursday 14th December at 5pm and any time after (no need to register for the online version).

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Wed, 25 Oct 2023
17:00
Lecture Theatre 1

Does Life know about quantum mechanics? - Jim Al-Khalili

Jim Al-Khalili
(University of Surrey)
Further Information

Oxford Mathematics Roger Penrose Public Lecture

Does Life know about quantum mechanics? Jim Al-Khalili

Physicists and chemists are used to dealing with quantum mechanics, but biologists have thus far got away without having to worry about this strange yet powerful theory of the subatomic world. However, times are changing. There is now solid evidence that enzymes use quantum tunnelling to accelerate chemical reactions, while plants and bacteria use a quantum trick in photosynthesis – sending lumps of sunlight energy in multiple directions at once. It even appears that some animals have the ability to use quantum entanglement – what Einstein called “spooky action at a distance” – as a compass to ‘see’ the earth’s magnetic field. In our research at the University of Surrey we are discovering that life may even have evolved mechanisms to control genetic mutations caused by quantum tunnelling of protons between strands of DNA. Welcome to the exciting new field of quantum biology.

Jim Al-Khalili CBE FRS is an academic, author and broadcaster. He holds a Distinguished Chair in Theoretical Physics at the University of Surrey where he conducts research in quantum physics. He has written fifteen books on popular science, between them translated into over twenty-six languages. He is a regular presenter of TV science documentaries and the long-running BBC Radio 4 programme, The Life Scientific.

Please email @email to register to attend in person.

The lecture will be broadcast on the Oxford Mathematics YouTube Channel on Wednesday 15 November at 5pm and any time after (no need to register for the online version).

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Tue, 03 Oct 2023
17:00
Lecture Theatre 1

Around the World in 80 Games - Marcus du Sautoy

Marcus du Sautoy
(University of Oxford)
Further Information

Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture: Around the World in 80 Games - Marcus du Sautoy

Join Marcus as he takes us on a mathematical journey across the centuries and through countries, continents and cultures in search of the games we love to play.  Based on his new book, he looks at the way mathematics has always been deeply intertwined with games and investigates how games themselves can provide us with opportunities for mathematical insight into the world.

From backgammon to chess, Catan to Snakes and Ladders, games are not simply an enjoyable diversion. They are rather the height of human ingenuity. Ours is the species that loves playing games: not homo sapiens but homo ludens.  The lecture is suitable for everyone ‘from age 8 to 108.’  Come and join Marcus on his journey Around the World in 80 Games. You simply can’t lose…

Marcus du Sautoy is Charles Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science in Oxford and Professor of Mathematics.

Please email @email to register.

The lecture will be broadcast on the Oxford Mathematics YouTube Channel on 24th October at 5pm, and can be watched any time after.

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Wed, 13 Sep 2023
17:00
Lecture Theatre 1

Four Ways of Thinking: Statistical, Interactive, Chaotic and Complex - David Sumpter

David Sumpter
Further Information

Mathematics is about finding better ways of reasoning. But for many applied mathematicians, the primary mission is to shape their minds in a way that gets them closer to the truth. The calculations are secondary, the real question is: how can we better understand the world around us?

David will take us on a journey through applied mathematics from statistics all the way to complexity theory, lifting examples from his work with football clubs — signing the best players (statistical thinking) or organising an attack (complex thinking) - and from every day life —  bickering less with our partners (interactive thinking) and learning to let go (chaotic thinking). David reimagines applied mathematics as a set of tools for life, from big work decisions to how we treat our friends, family and work colleagues. No problem is too big or too small for a mathematical solution.

Professor David Sumpter is author of five books including Soccermatics (2016), Outnumbered (2018) and Four Ways of Thinking (2023). His research covers everything from the inner workings of fish schools and ant colonies, through social psychology and segregation in society, to machine learning and artificial intelligence. He has consulted for leading football clubs and national teams and has written for The Economist 1843, The Telegraph, The Guardian, Prospect and FourFourTwo magazine.

Please email @email to register.

The lecture will be broadcast on our YouTube Channel exactly three weeks later, 5pm, 4th October and any time after.

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

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Thu, 27 Jul 2023
17:00
Lecture Theatre 1

Envisioning Imagination - Roger Penrose, Carlo Rovelli and Conrad Shawcross with Fatos Ustek - SOLD OUT

Various
Further Information

Imagination is the creative force for artists. But what about mathematicians and scientists? What part does imagination play in their work? What do the artist and the scientist have in common? And how do each envision things that will never be seen?

In this panel discussion two scientists and one artist, all leaders in their field, will provide an answer. They have more in common than you would think.

Nobel-prize winning scientist Roger Penrose is Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor in Oxford. Carlo Rovelli is a Professor in the Centre de Physique Théorique de Luminy of Aix-Marseille Université and the author of several popular-science books including 'Seven Brief Lesson on Physics'. Conrad Shawcross is an artist specialising in mechanical sculptures based on philosophical and scientific ideas. His exhibition, 'Cascading Principles' is currently showing in the Mathematical Institute.

The discussion will be chaired by curator and writer Fatos Ustek, curator of the 'Cascading Principles' exhibition.

There will be an opportunity to view the exhibition from 4pm on the day of the lecture.

Please email @email to register.

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures and the Conrad Shawcross Exhibition are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Wed, 31 May 2023
17:00
Lecture Theatre 1, Mathematical Institute, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, OX2 6GG

A world from a sheet of paper - Tadashi Tokieda

Tadashi Tokieda
(Stanford University)
Further Information

Starting from just a sheet of paper, by folding, stacking, crumpling, sometimes tearing, Tadashi will explore a diversity of phenomena, from magic tricks and geometry through elasticity and the traditional Japanese art of origami to medical devices and an ‘h-principle’. Much of the show consists of table-top demonstrations, which you can try later with friends and family.

So, take a sheet of paper. . .

Tadashi Tokieda is a professor of mathematics at Stanford.  He grew up as a painter in Japan, became a classical philologist (not to be confused with philosopher) in France and, having earned a PhD in pure mathematics from Princeton, has been an applied mathematician in England and the US; all in all, he has lived in eight countries so far.  Tadashi is very active in mathematical outreach, notably with the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences. You'll find him on Numberphile's YouTube channel.

Please email @email to register.

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Thu, 18 May 2023
18:30
Science Museum, London, SW7

Oxford Mathematics London Public Lecture: The Magic of the Primes - James Maynard with Hannah Fry SOLD OUT

James Maynard and Hannah Fry
Further Information

Please note this lecture is at the Science Museum, London, SW7.

In July 2022 Oxford Mathematician James Maynard received the Fields Medal, the highest honour for a mathematician under the age of 40, for his groundbreaking work on prime numbers. In this lecture he will explain the fascinations and frustrations of the primes before sitting down with Hannah to discuss his work and his life. 

Please email @email to register.

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Primes image

 

Thu, 23 Feb 2023
17:00
Lecture Theatre 1, Mathematical Institute, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, OX2 6GG

Cascading Principles - Conrad Shawcross, Martin Bridson and James Sparks with Fatos Ustek

Conrad Shawcross, James Sparks, Fatos Ustek
Further Information

Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture

Cascading Principles - Conrad Shawcross, Martin Bridson and James Sparks with Fatos Ustek

Thursday 23 February, 2023
5pm - 6.15pm Andrew Wiles Building, Mathematical Institute, Oxford

Cascading Principles is an exhibition of nearly 40 stunning, mathematically inspired sculptures which are living alongside the mathematicians that inspired them in the Andrew Wiles Building, home to Oxford Mathematics. In this 'lecture', chaired by exhibition curator Fatos Ustek, Conrad will talk about what motivates his work, and how the possibilities and uncertainties of science inform his art. In turn, mathematicians Martin Bridson and James Sparks will describe how a mathematician responds to art motivated by their subject. 

There will be an opportunity to view the exhibition from 4pm on the day of the lecture.

Conrad Shawcross specialises in mechanical sculptures based on philosophical and scientific ideas. He is the youngest living member of the Royal Academy of Arts. James Sparks is Professor of Mathematical Physics and Head of the Mathematical Institute in Oxford. Martin Bridson is Whitehead Professor of Pure Mathematics in Oxford and President of the Clay Mathematics Institute. Fatos Ustek is a curator and writer and a leading voice in contemporary art.

Please email @email to register.

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures and the Conrad Shawcross Exhibition are generously supported by XTX Markets.

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Tue, 13 Dec 2022
17:00
Lecture Theatre 1, Mathematical Institute, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, OX2 6GG

Anyone for a mince pi? Mathematical modelling of festive foods - Helen Wilson

Helen Wilson
(University College London)
Further Information

Oxford Mathematics Christmas Public Lecture

In this talk we'll look at a variety of delicious delights through a lens of fluid dynamics and mathematical modelling. From perfect roast potatoes to sweet sauces, mathematics gets everywhere!

Helen Wilson is Head of the Department of Mathematics at UCL. She is best known for her work on the chocolate fountain (which will feature in this lecture) but does do serious mathematical modelling as well.

Please email @email to register. The lecture will be followed by mince pies and drinks for all.

This lecture will be available on our Oxford Mathematics YouTube Channel at 5pm on 20th December.

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

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Wed, 02 Nov 2022
17:00
Lecture Theatre 1, Mathematical Institute, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG

Signatures of Streams - Professor Terry Lyons

Terry Lyons
Further Information

A calculator processes numbers without caring that these numbers refer to items in our shopping, or the calculations involved in designing an airplane. Number without context is a remarkable abstraction that we learn as infants and which has profoundly affected our world.

Our lives start, progress in complex ways, and are finally complete. So do tasks executed on a computer. Multimodal streams are a pervasive “type”, and even without fixing the context, have a rich structure. Developing this structure leads to wide-ranging tools that have had award-winning impact on methodology in health care, finance, and computer technology.

Terry Lyons is Professor of Mathematics in Oxford and a Fellow of St Anne's CollegeHis research is supported through the DataSig and Cimda-Oxford programmes.

Please email @email to register.

The lecture will be available on our Oxford Mathematics YouTube Channel on 09 November at 5 pm.

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Wed, 05 Oct 2022
17:00
Lecture Theatre 1, Mathematical Institute, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, OX2 6GG

The million-dollar shuffle: symmetry and complexity - Colva Roney-Dougal

Colva Roney-Dougal
(University of St Andrews)
Further Information

In 1936, Alan Turing proved the startling result that not all mathematical problems can be solved algorithmically. For those which can be, we still do not always know when there's a clever technique which could give us the answer quickly. In particular, the famous "P = NP" question asks whether, for problems where the correct solution has a proof which can easily be checked, in fact there's a quick way to find the answer.

Many difficult problems become easier if they have symmetries: finding the shortest route to deliver many parcels would be easy if all the houses were neatly arranged in a circle. This lecture will explore the interactions between symmetry and complexity.

Colva Roney-Dougal is Professor of Pure Mathematics at the University of St Andrews and Director of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Computational Algebra.

Please email @email to register.

The lecture will be available on our Oxford Mathematics YouTube Channel on 12 October at 5 pm.

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Thu, 15 Sep 2022

17:00 - 18:00
Lecture Theatre 1, Mathematical Institute, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, OX2 6GG

A mathematical journey through scales - Martin Hairer

Martin Hairer
(Imperial College)
Further Information

Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture

A mathematical journey through scales - Martin Hairer

The tiny world of particles and atoms and the gigantic world of the entire universe are separated by about forty orders of magnitude. As we move from one to the other, the laws of nature can behave in drastically different ways, sometimes obeying quantum physics, general relativity, or Newton’s classical mechanics, not to mention other intermediate theories.

Understanding the transformations that take place from one scale to another is one of the great classical questions in mathematics and theoretical physics, one that still hasn't been fully resolved. In this lecture, we will explore how these questions still inform and motivate interesting problems in probability theory and why so-called toy models, despite their superficially playful character, can sometimes lead to certain quantitative predictions.

Professor Martin Hairer is Professor of Pure Mathematics at Imperial College London. He was awarded the Fields Medal in 2014.

Please email @email to register.

The lecture will be available on our Oxford Mathematics YouTube Channel on 22 September at 5 pm.

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

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Thu, 12 May 2022

17:00 - 18:00
Lecture Theatre 1, Mathematical Institute, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, OX2 6GG

Communicating Complex Statistical Ideas to the Public: Lessons from the Pandemic - David Spiegelhalter

David Spiegelhalter
(University of Cambridge)
Further Information

Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture

Communicating Complex Statistical Ideas to the Public: Lessons from the Pandemic - David Spiegelhalter

In-person:Thursday 12 May, 5.00-6.00pm, Mathematical Institute, Oxford

Online: Thursday 19 May, 5.00-6.00pm, Oxford Mathematics YouTube Channel

The pandemic has demonstrated how important data becomes at a time of crisis. But statistics are tricky: they don't always mean what we think they mean, there are many subtle pitfalls, and some people misrepresent their message. Their interpretation is an art. David will describe efforts at communicating about statistics during the pandemic, including both successes and dismal failures.

Professor Sir David Spiegelhalter FRS OBE is Chair of the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication at the University of Cambridge, which aims to improve the way that statistical evidence is used by health professionals, patients, lawyers and judges, media and policy-makers. He has been very busy over the Covid crisis. His bestselling book, The Art of Statistics, was published in March 2019, and Covid by Numbers came out in October 2021. He was knighted in 2014 for services to medical statistics.

Please email @email to register for the in-person event (the online screening requires no registration).

The lecture will be available on our Oxford Mathematics YouTube Channel on 19th May at 5pm (and can be watched any time after that).

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

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Thu, 17 Mar 2022

17:00 - 18:15

Deep Maths - machine learning and mathematics

Alex Davies, Andras Juhasz, Marc Lackenby, Geordie Williamson
Further Information

In December 2021 mathematicians at Oxford and Sydney universities together with their collaborators at DeepMind announced that they had successfully used tools from machine learning to discover new patterns in mathematics. But what exactly had they done and what are its implications for the future of mathematics and mathematicians?

This online event will feature short talks from each of the four collaborators explaining their work followed by a panel discussion addressing its wider implications.

The speakers:
Alex Davies - DeepMind
Andras Juhasz - University of Oxford
Marc Lackenby - University of Oxford
Geordie Williamson - University of Sydney

The panel will be chaired by Jon Keating, Sedleian Professor of Natural Philosophy in Oxford.

This is an online only lecture which every one is free to watch:
Oxford Mathematics YouTube

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Tue, 06 Jul 2021

17:00 - 18:00

Mathemalchemy: a mathematical and artistic adventure - Ingrid Daubechies

Ingrid Daubechies
(Duke University)
Further Information

A collaborative art installation celebrating the joy, creativity and beauty of mathematics has been in the works for the past two years, and will soon be ready to emerge from its long gestation. The original idea, conceived by textile artist Dominique Ehrmann and mathematician Ingrid Daubechies inspired a team of 24 Mathemalchemists to work together, transforming the whole conception in the process, and bringing their individual expertise and whimsy to a large installation.

Despite the challenges of Covid-19, the team created a fantasy world where herons haul up nets loaded with special knots in the Knotical scene, a tortoise meditates while ambling along Zeno's path, chipmunks and squirrels ponder the mysteries of prime numbers, and a cat named Arnold bakes cookies that tile the plane in the Mandelbrot bakery; and a myriad more mathematical ideas swirl through the air.

This presentation will introduce some of the ideas and components, and show the team at work. Here's a sneak preview:
www.mathemalchemy.org
@mathemalchemy

Multi-award winning Ingrid Daubechies is James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of Mathematics and Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke University.

Watch (no need to register and it will remain available after broadcast):
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The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

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Tue, 25 May 2021

17:00 - 19:15

I is a Strange Loop - Written and performed by Marcus du Sautoy and Victoria Gould

Marcus du Sautoy and Victoria Gould
(University of Oxford)
Further Information
Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture in partnership with Faber Members
Tuesday 25 May 2021
5.00-7.15pm

From the creative ensemble behind Complicité’s sensational A Disappearing Number, this two-hander unfolds to reveal an intriguing take on mortality, consciousness and artificial life. Alone in a cube that glows in the darkness, X is content with its infinite universe and abstract thought. But then Y appears, insisting they interact, exposing X to Y's sensory and physical existence. Each begins to hanker after what the other has until a remarkable thing happens … involving a strange loop. 

After the screening and to coincide with publication of the script by Faber, Marcus and Victoria are joined by Simon McBurney, founder of Complicite, to discuss the play and mathematics and theatre.

A discount of 25 per cent on the playtext is available from faber.co.uk using the code LOOP25 from May 20.

Watch (no need to register and it will remain available after broadcast):

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Tue, 16 Mar 2021

17:00 - 18:00

From one extreme to another: the statistics of extreme events - Jon Keating

Further Information

Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture
Tuesday 16 March 2021
5.00-6.00pm

Jon Keating will discuss the statistics of rare, extreme events in various contexts, including: evaluating performance at the Olympics; explaining how glasses freeze; illustrating why computers are more effective than expected at learning; and understanding the Riemann zeta-function, the mathematical object that encodes the mysterious distribution of the prime numbers. 

Jon Keating is Sedleian Professor of Natural Philosophy in the University of Oxford and a Fellow of The Queen's College.

Watch live (no need to register and it will stay up afterwards):

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The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Tue, 16 Feb 2021

17:00 - 18:30

Spacetime Singularities - Roger Penrose, Dennis Lehmkuhl & Melvyn Bragg

(University of Oxford and University of Bonn)
Further Information

Oxford Mathematics Online Public Lecture in Partnership with Wadham College celebrating Roger Penrose's Nobel Prize

Spacetime Singularities - Roger Penrose, Dennis Lehmkuhl and Melvyn Bragg
Tuesday 16 February 2021
5.00-6.30pm

Dennis Lehmkuhl: From Schwarzschild’s singularity and Hadamard’s catastrophe to Penrose’s trapped surfaces
Roger Penrose: Spacetime singularities - to be or not to be?
Roger Penrose & Melvyn Bragg: In conversation

What are spacetime singularities? Do they exist in nature or are they artefacts of our theoretical reasoning? Most importantly, if we accept the general theory of relativity, our best theory of space, time, and gravity, do we then also have to accept the existence of spacetime singularities?

In this special lecture, Sir Roger Penrose, 2020 Nobel Laureate for Physics, will give an extended version of his Nobel Prize Lecture, describing his path to the first general singularity theorem of general relativity, and to the ideas that sprung from this theorem, notably the basis for the existence of Black Holes. He will be introduced by Dennis Lehmkuhl whose talk will describe how the concept of a spacetime singularity developed prior to Roger's work, in work by Einstein and others, and how much of a game changer the first singularity theorem really was.

The lectures will be followed by an interview with Roger by Melvyn Bragg.

Roger Penrose is the 2020 Nobel Laureate for Physics and Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor in Oxford; Dennis Lehmkuhl is Lichtenberg Professor of History and Philosophy of Physics at the University of Bonn and one of the Editors of Albert Einstein's Collected Papers: Melvyn Bragg is a broadcaster and author best known for his work as editor and presenter of the South Bank Show and In Our Time.

Watch online (no need to register - and the lecture will stay up on all channels afterwards):
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The Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture are generously supported by XTX Markets

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Thu, 19 Nov 2020

17:00 - 18:00
Virtual

Oxford Mathematics Online Public Lecture: Anna Seigal - Ideas for a Complex World

Anna Seigal
(University of Oxford)
Further Information

Humans have been processing information in the world for a long time, finding patterns and learning from our surroundings to solve problems. Today, scientists make sense of complex problems by gathering vast amounts of data, and analysing them with quantitative methods. These methods are important tools to understand the issues facing us: the spread of disease, climate change, or even political movements. But this quantitative toolbox can seem far removed from our individual approaches for processing information in our day-to-day lives. This disconnect and inaccessibility leads to the scientific tools becoming entangled in politics and questions of trust.

In this talk, Anna will describe how some of the ideas at the heart of science’s quantitative tools are familiar to us all. We’ll see how mathematics enables us to turn the ideas into tools. As a society, if we can better connect with the ideas driving this toolbox, we can see when to use (and not to use) the available tools, what’s missing from the toolbox, and how we might come up with new ideas to drive our future understanding of the world around us.

Anna Seigal is a Hooke Research Fellow in the Mathematical Institute at the University of Oxford and a Junior Research Fellow at The Queen's College.

Watch live (no need to register):
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The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Wed, 28 Oct 2020

17:00 - 18:00

Oxford Mathematics Online Public Lecture: David Sumpter - How Learning Ten Equations Can Improve Your Life

Further Information

Is there a secret formula for becoming rich? Or for happiness? Or for becoming popular? Or for self-confidence and good judgement? David Sumpter answer these questions with an emphatic ‘Yes!' All YOU need are The Ten Equations.

In this lecture David will reveal three of these: the confidence equation that helps gamblers know when they have a winning strategy; the influencer equation that shapes our social interactions; and the learning equation that YouTube used to get us addicted to their videos. A small group of mathematicians have used these equations to revolutionise our world. Now you can use them too to better manage your time and make money, have a more balanced approach to your popularity and even to become a nicer person.

To order the book 'The Ten Equations That Rule the World' signed by David Sumpter from Blackwell's Bookshop, email @email by 15 November and they will provide you with all the information you need.

David Sumpter is Professor of Applied Mathematics at the University of Uppsala, Sweden.

Watch online (no need to register):
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The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

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Thu, 08 Oct 2020

17:00 - 18:00

Oxford Mathematics Online Public Lecture: Tim Harford - How to Make the World Add up

Further Information

When was the last time you read a grand statement, accompanied by a large number, and wondered whether it could really be true?

Statistics are vital in helping us tell stories – we see them in the papers, on social media, and we hear them used in everyday conversation – and yet we doubt them more than ever. But numbers, in the right hands, have the power to change the world for the better. Contrary to popular belief, good statistics are not a trick, although they are a kind of magic. Good statistics are like a telescope for an astronomer, or a microscope for a bacteriologist. If we are willing to let them, good statistics help us see things about the world around us and about ourselves.

Tim Harford is a senior columnist for the Financial Times, the presenter of Radio 4’s More or Less and is a visiting fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford. His books include The Fifty Things that Made the Modern Economy, Messy, and The Undercover Economist.

To order a personalised copy of Tim's book email @email, providing your name and contact phone number/email and the personalisation you would like. You can then pick up from 16/10 or contact Blackwell's on 01865 792792 from that date to pay and have it sent.

Watch online (no need to register):
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The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Tue, 08 Sep 2020

17:00 - 18:00

Joshua Bull - Can maths tell us how to win at Fantasy Football?

Joshua Bull
(University of Oxford)
Further Information

Fantasy Football is played by millions of people worldwide, and there are countless strategies that you can choose to try to beat your friends and win the game. But what’s the best way to play? Should you be patient and try to grind out a win, or are you better off taking some risks and going for glory? Should you pick players in brilliant form, or players with a great run of fixtures coming up? And what is this Fantasy Football thing anyway?

As with many of life’s deep questions, maths can help us shed some light on the answers. We’ll explore some classic mathematical problems which help us understand the world of Fantasy Football. We’ll apply some of the modelling techniques that mathematicians use in their research to the problem of finding better Fantasy Football management strategies. And - if we’re lucky - we’ll answer the big question: Can maths tell us how to win at Fantasy Football?

Joshua Bull is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Mathematical Institute in Oxford and the winner of the 2019-2020 Premier League Fantasy Football competition (from nearly 8 million entrants).

Watch live (no need to register):
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The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

 

Wed, 27 May 2020

17:00 - 18:00
L1

Philip Maini: Squirrels, Turing and Excitability - Mathematical Modelling in Biology, Ecology and Medicine

Philip Maini
(University of Oxford)
Further Information

Mathematical modelling lives a varied life. It links the grey squirrel invasion in the UK to the analysis of how tumour cells invade the body; Alan Turing's model for pattern formation gives insight into animal coat markings and Premier League Football Shirts; and models for Excitability have been used to model the life cycle of the cellular slime mold and heart attacks.

Philip Maini will reveal all in our latest Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture.

Philip Maini is Professor of Mathematical Biology in the University of Oxford.

Watch live:
https://twitter.com/OxUniMaths
https://www.facebook.com/OxfordMathematics/
https://livestream.com/oxuni/Maini

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.

Wed, 13 May 2020

17:00 - 18:00

Renaud Lambiotte - Smartphones vs COVID-19

Renaud Lambiotte
(University of Oxford)
Further Information

For several weeks news media has been full of how contact tracing Smartphone apps could help fight COVID-19. However, mobile phones can do more than just trace - they are vital tools in the measurement, prediction and control of the virus.

Looking at recent epidemics as well as COVID-19, Renaud will discuss the different types of data that researchers have been collecting, demonstrating their pros and cons as well as taking a wider view of where mobile data can help us understand the impact of lockdowns on social behaviour and improve our ways of calibrating and updating our epidemiological models. And he will discuss the issue that underpins all this and which is vital for widespread take-up from the Public: privacy and data protection.

Renaud Lambiotte is Associate Professor of Networks and Nonlinear Systems in Oxford.

Watch live:
https://twitter.com/OxUniMaths
https://www.facebook.com/OxfordMathematics/
https://livestream.com/oxuni/lambiotte

The Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures are generously supported by XTX Markets.