News

Thursday, 16 February 2017

Ursula Martin elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh

Oxford Mathematician and Computer Scientist Ursula Martin has been elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, joining over 1600 current fellows drawn from a wide range of disciplines – science & technology, arts, humanities, social science, business and public service.

Ursula's career has taken in Cambridge and Warwick and included spells across the Atlantic as well as recently at Queen Mary, University of London. From 1992 to 2002, she was Professor of Computer Science at the University of St Andrews in Scotland, the first female professor at the University since its foundation in 1411. Her work around theoretical Computer Science is accompanied by a passionate commitment to advancing the cause of women in science. She has also been a leading light in the recent study and promotion of the life and work of Victorian Mathematician Ada Lovelace and has been instrumental in examining and explaining Ada's mathematics as well as promoting her achievements as a woman.

 

 

Friday, 25 November 2016

Maria Bruna wins the Women of the Future Science award

Oxford Mathematician Maria Bruna has won the Women of the Future Science award. The Women of the Future Awards, founded by Pinky Lilani in 2006, were conceived to provide a platform for the pipeline of female talent in the UK. Now in their 11th year they recognise the inspirational young female stars of today and tomorrow. They are open to women aged 35 or under and celebrate talent across categories including business, culture, media, technology and more.

Maria's work focuses on partial differential equations, stochastic simulation algorithms and the application of these techniques to the modelling of biological and ecological systems. 

Tuesday, 1 November 2016

Gui-Qiang Chen elected Fellow of the American Mathematical Society

Oxford Mathematician and Fellow of Keble College, Gui-Qiang G. Chen has been elected a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society in recognition of his contribution to partial differential equations, nonlinear analysis, fluid mechanics, hyperbolic conservation laws, and shock wave theory.

Professor Chen is Statutory Professor in the Analysis of Partial Differential Equations and Director of the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Partial Differential Equations in Oxford.

 

Tuesday, 4 October 2016

Frances Kirwan wins Suffrage Science award

The Clinical Sciences Centre based at Imperial College in London has launched a new initiative to celebrate women in maths and computing. As a new branch of the existing Suffrage Science scheme, it will encourage women into science, and to reach senior leadership roles.

Women make up no more than four in ten undergraduates studying maths. Suffrage Science aims to make a difference. There are currently two sections, one for women in the Life Sciences, and one for those in Engineering and the Physical Sciences. Now there is a third specialism, for women in Maths and Computing. Twelve women will receive awards to celebrate their scientific achievements and ability to inspire others. Oxford Mathematician Frances Kirwan FRS is one of the first recipients of the award for Mathematics.

The awards themselves are pieces of jewellery, designed by students at the arts college Central Saint Martins-UAL, and inspired by science. One, a silver bangle, holds a secret. Engraved on the inside, and hidden beneath a layer of silver, is what many mathematicians consider the most beautiful equation in mathematics, Euler’s equation.

 

Saturday, 20 August 2016

Alison Etheridge named Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics

Alison Etheridge FRS, Professor of Probability in the University of Oxford, has been named Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics (IMS).  Professor Etheridge received the award for outstanding research on measure-valued stochastic processes and applications to population biology; and for international leadership and impressive service to the profession.

Each Fellow nominee is assessed by a committee of their peers for the award.  In 2016, after reviewing 50 nominations, 16 were selected for Fellowship.  Created in 1935, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics is a member organisation which fosters the development and dissemination of the theory and applications of statistics and probability. An induction ceremony took place on July 11 at the World Congress in Probability and Statistics in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Alison is also President Elect of the IMS.

Thursday, 14 July 2016

Vicky Neale from Oxford Mathematics wins divisional teaching award

Vicky Neale from Oxford Mathematics has won an MPLS (Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences) Teaching Award for her innovative and entertaining undergraduate teaching. Using blogs and tips to back up her lectures, Vicky's expansive approach has led to widespread praise from the toughest of critics, namely the students themselves.

Vicky is Whitehead Lecturer at Oxford, a post dedicated to the wider communication of mathematics. She regularly gives public lectures, including the prestigious London Mathematical Society Popular Lectures in 2013 and runs workshops for schools and teenagers including PROMYS Europe. She is also a regular guest on radio including BBC Radio 4's' Start the Week' and 'In Our Time'.

The MPLS awards are part of the University of Oxford's commitment to the highest standards of teaching across all its departments. 

Thursday, 23 June 2016

Maria Bruna wins L'Oréal UK & Ireland Fellowship For Women in Science

Oxford Mathematician Maria Bruna has won a prestigious L'Oréal UK & Ireland Fellowship For Women in Science. Launched in January 2007, the Fellowships are awards offered by a partnership between L'Oréal UK & Ireland, the UK National Commission for UNESCO and the Irish National Commission for UNESCO, with the support of the Royal Society. Five Fellowships are awarded annually to outstanding female postdoctoral researchers. Each worth £15,000, the Fellowships are tenable at any UK or Irish university / research institute to support a 12-month period of postdoctoral research in any area of the life and physical sciences, mathematics and engineering.

The Fellowships have been designed to provide practical help for the winners to undertake research in their chosen fields. For example, winners may choose to spend their fellowship on buying scientific equipment, paying for child care costs, travel costs or indeed whatever they may need to continue their research.

Maria's research interests lie in the stochastic modelling of interacting particle systems, with applications for explaining how individual-level mechanisms give rise to population-level behaviour in biology and ecology. She is the first mathematician to win a fellowship.

Thursday, 16 June 2016

Mathematical Institute receives a Gold Green Impact Award

Green Impact Awards - Bronze, Silver, Gold

The Mathematical Institute has struck gold in this years Green Impact Awards, adding to the silver and bronze awards received in the preceeding two years. The Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (MPLS) division as a whole continues to go from strength to strength and this year four departments received the highest level gold award. The scheme is now in its third year in the university and has grown to involve over 200 people representing over 40 departments/teams.

Green Impact, the University’s main engagement programme is all about making small changes that add up to make a big difference. Changes are made by staff and students within their working environment, whether a department or building, laboratory or college. Green Impact sees teams recognised at four levels: working towards bronze, bronze, silver, and gold. 45 teams took part across the University this year with 16 teams reaching the gold level, an outstanding achievement.

The evening was hosted by Pro-Vice-Chancellor William James and President of the Oxford University Student Union Becky Howe and took place at the new Blavatnik School of Government Building.

Guest presenters and speakers included: Vice-Chancellor Professor Louise Richardson; Neil Jennings, National Union of Students; Calum Miller Chief Operating Office of Blavatnik School of Government; last year’s Green Impact staff award winner Sue Henderson from the Chemistry Department; Paul Goffin, Director of Estates; Professor Mark Pollard, Associate Head of Social Sciences Division (Research); Professor Donal Bradley, Head of the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (MPLS) Division; Professor Alastair Buchan, Dean of Medicine and Head of Medical Sciences Division; Alan Rusbridger, Principal of Lady Margaret Hall; and Harriet Waters, Head of Environmental Sustainability.

Monday, 6 June 2016

Oxford Mathematics awarded Regius Professorship for the Queen's 90th birthday

The Mathematical Institute at the University of Oxford has been awarded a new Regius Professorship as part of the Queen’s 90th birthday celebrations.

Twelve new Regius Professorships – rare, sovereign-granted titles recognising the most outstanding levels of research in their fields – were awarded to leading British universities to mark the milestone. This is the first time since 1842 that Oxford has been awarded a Regius Professorship.

The Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford, Professor Louise Richardson, said: "2016 is proving to be quite a year for the Mathematical Institute at Oxford, with the Abel Prize presented to Sir Andrew Wiles and Nigel Hitchin recently announced as Shaw Prize laureate. Being awarded a Regius Professorship in Mathematics is wonderful news for the University and another mark of distinction for Oxford Mathematics."

Professor Martin Bridson, Head of the Mathematical Institute at Oxford, said: "This is a special moment in the history of Oxford Mathematics. The award of this Regius Professorship is a wonderful recognition of all that we have achieved and of the exciting future that lies before us.

A noteworthy feature of the award is that it recognises both our pre-eminence in fundamental research and the enormous benefits that flow to society from mathematics. Progress at the frontiers of science and technology has always made great demands of mathematics, and today it reaches more deeply than ever into the core of the discipline. Oxford is proud of the way in which it embraces the power of this interaction."

Until now, only 14 Regius Professorships had been granted since the reign of Queen Victoria, including 12 to mark the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. As in 2012, recipients of new Regius Professorships have been selected by open competition, judged by an independent panel of business and academic experts.

Each institution will assign the title to an existing professor in the chosen department or will appoint a new professor to take the chair and hold the title.

John Penrose, Minister for Constitution, said: "It is a privilege and an honour to announce these new Regius Professorships in recognition of the truly outstanding work of our universities and as a fitting tribute to mark Her Majesty’s 90th birthday. The 12 institutions can consider themselves truly deserving of this great honour."

In the past, Regius Professorships were created when a university chair was founded or endowed by a royal patron. Previously, they were limited to a handful of the ancient universities of the United Kingdom and Ireland, namely Oxford, Cambridge, St Andrews, Glasgow, Aberdeen, Edinburgh, and Trinity College, Dublin.

Announced in the government’s Productivity Plan in July, the new Regius Professorships will celebrate the increasingly important role of academic research in driving growth and improving productivity over the past 90 years.

The creation of Regius Professorships falls under the Royal Prerogative, and each appointment is approved by the monarch on ministerial advice.

Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne said: "I am passionate about promoting science and economic growth right across the country. That’s why I promised to push for prestigious new Regius Professorships, not just in London and Oxbridge but in other great centres of learning, including the Northern Powerhouse, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. I’m delighted that promise is being honoured today."

Jo Johnson, Minister for Universities and Science, said: "The success of our economy is underpinned by the exceptional science and research taking place in our world-leading universities up and down the country, and I’m delighted these 12 institutions have been recognised for their achievements. We’ll continue to make sure pioneering science is recognised and supported to help improve the lives of millions across the country and beyond."

Tuesday, 31 May 2016

Nigel Hitchin wins the Shaw Prize

Professor Nigel Hitchin FRSSavilian Professor of Geometry in the Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford has won the prestigious Shaw Prize in Mathematical Sciences for, in the words of the Prize Foundation "his far-reaching contributions to geometry, representation theory and theoretical physics. The fundamental and elegant concepts and techniques that he has introduced have had wide impact and are of lasting importance."

Professor Frances Kirwan FRS, a colleague in Oxford, paid tribute: "Nigel Hitchin has made fundamental contributions to the fields of differential and algebraic geometry and richly deserves the award of the Shaw Prize. His work has influenced a wide range of areas in geometry and mathematical physics, including symplectic and hyperkähler geometry, the theory of instanton and monopole equations, twistor theory, integrable systems, Higgs bundles, Einstein metrics and mirror symmetry."

Professor Martin Bridson FRS, Head of the Mathematical Institute in Oxford, said: "'it is a real joy to see Nigel Hitchin's profound and influential work recognised by the award of the 2016 Shaw Prize. His inspiring intellectual leadership in geometry has been matched throughout his career by many services to the mathematical community in the UK and across the world, for which we are all deeply grateful. Oxford has been extremely fortunate to have Nigel with us for so much of his career, and we are very proud of him."

Nigel said on news of the award: "I am delighted and honoured to be awarded this prize. Since most of my working life has been spent in Oxford, it is also a recognition of the support I have received here. I was pleased to note that my “twin” in New College, the Savilian Professor of Astronomy, won the Shaw prize a few years ago.”

The Shaw Prize is an annual award first presented by the Shaw Prize Foundation in 2004. Established in 2002 in Hong Kong it honours living individuals who are currently active in their respective fields and who have recently achieved distinguished and significant advances, who have made outstanding contributions in academic and scientific research or applications, or who in other domains have achieved excellence. The 2016 prize is worth US$1.2m to each winner.

Pages