Tue, 08 Feb 2022
12:00
L5

A Mathematical Study of Hawking Radiation for Reissner Nordstrom black holes

Fred Alford
(Imperial College)
Abstract

In the first part of this talk, we will (briefly) derive the original calculation by Hawking in 1974 to determine the radiation given off by a black hole, giving the result in the form of an integral of a classical solution to the linear wave equation.
In the second part of the talk, we will take this integral as a starting point, and rigorously calculate the radiation given off by a forming spherically symmetric, charged black hole. We will then show that for late times in its formation, the radiation given off approaches the limit predicted by Hawking, including the extremal case. We will also calculate a bound on the rate at which this limit is approached.

Mon, 18 Oct 2021

16:00 - 17:00
L3

On the diffusive-mean field limit for weakly interacting diffusions exhibiting phase transitions

GREG PAVLIOTIS
(Imperial College)
Abstract

I will present recent results on the statistical behaviour of a large number of weakly interacting diffusion processes evolving under the influence of a periodic interaction potential. We study the combined mean field and diffusive (homogenisation) limits. In particular, we show that these two limits do not commute if the mean field system constrained on the torus undergoes a phase transition, i.e., if it admits more than one steady state. A typical example of such a system on the torus is given by mean field plane rotator (XY, Heisenberg, O(2)) model. As a by-product of our main results, we also analyse the energetic consequences of the central limit theorem for fluctuations around the mean field limit and derive optimal rates of convergence in relative entropy of the Gibbs measure to the (unique) limit of the mean field energy below the critical temperature. This is joint work with Matias Delgadino (U Texas Austin) and Rishabh Gvalani (MPI Leipzig).

 

 

Mon, 18 Oct 2021
14:15
L4

Higher rank DT theory from curve counting

Richard Thomas
(Imperial College)
Abstract

Fix a Calabi-Yau 3-fold X. Its DT invariants count stable bundles and sheaves on X. The generalised DT invariants of Joyce-Song count semistable bundles and sheaves on X. I will describe work with Soheyla Feyzbakhsh showing these generalised DT invariants in any rank r can be written in terms of rank 1 invariants. By the MNOP conjecture the latter are determined by the GW invariants of X.
Along the way we also show they are determined by rank 0 invariants counting sheaves supported on surfaces in X. These invariants are predicted by S-duality to be governed by (vector-valued, mock) modular forms.

Tue, 01 Jun 2021
12:00
Virtual

The nonlinear stability of the Schwarzschild family of black holes

Martin Taylor
(Imperial College)
Abstract

I will present a theorem on the full finite codimension nonlinear asymptotic stability of the Schwarzschild family of black holes.  The proof employs a double null gauge, is expressed entirely in physical space, and utilises the analysis of Dafermos--Holzegel--Rodnianski on the linear stability of the Schwarzschild family.  This is joint work with M. Dafermos, G. Holzegel and I. Rodnianski.

Thu, 07 May 2020
16:00
Virtual

Variational principles for fluid dynamics on rough paths

James Michael Leahy
(Imperial College)
Further Information
Abstract

We introduce constrained variational principles for fluid dynamics on rough paths. The advection of the fluid is constrained to be the sum of a vector field which represents coarse-scale motion and a rough (in time) vector field which parametrizes fine-scale motion. The rough vector field is regarded as fixed and the rough partial differential equation for the coarse-scale velocity is derived as a consequence of being a critical point of the action functional.

 

The action functional is perturbative in the sense that if the rough vector f ield is set to zero, then the corresponding variational principle agrees with the reduced (to the vector fields) Euler-Poincare variational principle introduced in Holm, Marsden and Ratiu (1998). More precisely, the Lagrangian in the action functional encodes the physics of the fluid and is a function of only the coarse-scale velocity. 

 

By parametrizing the fine-scales of fluid motion with a rough vector field, we preserve the pathwise nature of deterministic fluid dynamics and establish a flexible framework for stochastic parametrization schemes. The main benefit afforded by our approach is that the system of rough partial differential equations we derive satisfy essential conservation laws, including Kelvin’s circulation theorem. This talk is based on recent joint work with Dan Crisan, Darryl Holm, and Torstein Nilssen.

Tue, 10 Mar 2020

12:00 - 13:00
C1

Reconciling emergences: An information-theoretic approach to identify causal emergence in multivariate data

Fernando Rosas
(Imperial College)
Abstract

The notion of emergence is at the core of many of the most challenging open scientific questions, being so much a cause of wonder as a perennial source of philosophical headaches. Two classes of emergent phenomena are usually distinguished: strong emergence, which corresponds to supervenient properties with irreducible causal power; and weak emergence, which are properties generated by the lower levels in such "complicated" ways that they can only be derived by exhaustive simulation. While weak emergence is generally accepted, a large portion of the scientific community considers causal emergence to be either impossible, logically inconsistent, or scientifically irrelevant.

In this talk we present a novel, quantitative framework that assesses emergence by studying the high-order interactions of the system's dynamics. By leveraging the Integrated Information Decomposition (ΦID) framework [1], our approach distinguishes two types of emergent phenomena: downward causation, where macroscopic variables determine the future of microscopic degrees of freedom; and causal decoupling, where macroscopic variables influence other macroscopic variables without affecting their corresponding microscopic constituents. Our framework also provides practical tools that are applicable on a range of scenarios of practical interest, enabling to test -- and possibly reject -- hypotheses about emergence in a data-driven fashion. We illustrate our findings by discussing minimal examples of emergent behaviour, and present a few case studies of systems with emergent dynamics, including Conway’s Game of Life, neural population coding, and flocking models.
[1] Mediano, Pedro AM, Fernando Rosas, Robin L. Carhart-Harris, Anil K. Seth, and Adam B. Barrett. "Beyond integrated information: A taxonomy of information dynamics phenomena." arXiv preprint arXiv:1909.02297 (2019).
 

Tue, 28 Jan 2020

15:30 - 16:30
L4

Donaldson-Thomas theory and tautological bundles on Hilbert schemes of points on surfaces

Noah Arbesfeld
(Imperial College)
Abstract

Tautological bundles on Hilbert schemes of points often enter into enumerative and physical computations. I will explain how to use the Donaldson-Thomas theory of toric threefolds to produce combinatorial identities that are expressed geometrically using tautological bundles on the Hilbert scheme of points on a surface. I'll also explain how these identities can be used to study Euler characteristics of tautological bundles over Hilbert schemes of points on general surfaces.

Tue, 07 Apr 2020

12:00 - 13:00
C1

TBD

Florian Klimm
(Imperial College)
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